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Old 16-08-2011, 06:48   #31
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

Quote:
Originally Posted by nv5l View Post
As far as I'm concerned, you're either on watch or you're not..
Oh PuLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESe go play in a thread thats done that to death by mental pygmies.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mambo View Post
: you are tired and cold / cockpit is not dry place to be,
TIA
First point: Don't get tired! Start out as if you have already been out 24 hours. Start getting sleep immediately. A 5 minute catnap is better than nothing and once your body is attuned to it you are fine. If you can't catnap then stop moving, lie down and pretend to be asleep.

Never sleep up a tree because its uncomfortable. So only sleep in the cockpit if its comfortable (or you're just doing a 5 min nap with a ship close). If its cold and wet go below! How hard is it? You are still closer to the helm than a ships officer when he's at the wrong end of the bridge.

Coastal/Far off shore: Sure offshore is safest; but if cruising the coast still GET SLEEP. Stop being a twit and learn to asses ships tracks better. It can be done so get your own skills up to where you can still have a nap when there's ships about. I have even napped when they are heading towards me because I have worked out their speed. You are a fool to stay up for 2 hours when you should have realised the ship was taking 2 hours to get to you.

Staying awake for 24 hours is stupid and foolish! What does the CIA do interrogate someone? SLEEP DEPRIVATION!!!!!!!!!

Screwing with sleep screws your mind. So use your brain and sleep.

The photo below is a plotter on the cockpit table lined fore and aft. Course on the dial. When you clearly see a ship put Blue Tack on its bearing. Then DON'T look for 5 minutes. Then take another bearing. Then a third or more but only at 5 min intervals. If the Blue Tack ends up in a pile you are going to hit the ship and die.


Solo is easy if you take you hand outta your pants, turn your brain on and skill up!





Mark
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Old 16-08-2011, 07:01   #32
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

I think the key point here--as far as the original question is concerned--is what Mark does NOT say. He does NOT say that you can rely on your AIS or radar to do your watching for you. There is no electronic gizmo that can EVER substitute for sticking your head up and looking around!

The single-hander who goes soundly to sleep, and relies entirely on some electronic gizmo to warn him of danger, is a FOOL!
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Old 16-08-2011, 07:30   #33
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Oh PuLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESe go play in a thread thats done that to death by mental pygmies.





First point: Don't get tired! Start out as if you have already been out 24 hours. Start getting sleep immediately. A 5 minute catnap is better than nothing and once your body is attuned to it you are fine. If you can't catnap then stop moving, lie down and pretend to be asleep.

Never sleep up a tree because its uncomfortable. So only sleep in the cockpit if its comfortable (or you're just doing a 5 min nap with a ship close). If its cold and wet go below! How hard is it? You are still closer to the helm than a ships officer when he's at the wrong end of the bridge.

Coastal/Far off shore: Sure offshore is safest; but if cruising the coast still GET SLEEP. Stop being a twit and learn to asses ships tracks better. It can be done so get your own skills up to where you can still have a nap when there's ships about. I have even napped when they are heading towards me because I have worked out their speed. You are a fool to stay up for 2 hours when you should have realised the ship was taking 2 hours to get to you.

Staying awake for 24 hours is stupid and foolish! What does the CIA do interrogate someone? SLEEP DEPRIVATION!!!!!!!!!

Screwing with sleep screws your mind. So use your brain and sleep.

The photo below is a plotter on the cockpit table lined fore and aft. Course on the dial. When you clearly see a ship put Blue Tack on its bearing. Then DON'T look for 5 minutes. Then take another bearing. Then a third or more but only at 5 min intervals. If the Blue Tack ends up in a pile you are going to hit the ship and die.


Solo is easy if you take you hand outta your pants, turn your brain on and skill up!

Mark

Gotta agree...some good points!!!!!!
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Old 16-08-2011, 07:32   #34
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
I think the key point here--as far as the original question is concerned--is what Mark does NOT say. He does NOT say that you can rely on your AIS or radar to do your watching for you. There is no electronic gizmo that can EVER substitute for sticking your head up and looking around!

The single-hander who goes soundly to sleep, and relies entirely on some electronic gizmo to warn him of danger, is a FOOL!
While human senses are good.....lack of sleep can make electronics even more important...most electronic devices are far superior to human senses and instinct if used in the appropriate manner.
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Old 16-08-2011, 07:47   #35
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
I think the key point here--as far as the original question is concerned--is what Mark does NOT say. He does NOT say that you can rely on your AIS or radar to do your watching for you. There is no electronic gizmo that can EVER substitute for sticking your head up and looking around!

The single-hander who goes soundly to sleep, and relies entirely on some electronic gizmo to warn him of danger, is a FOOL!
After a few weeks alone offshore, with ais picking up every (few and far between) ship before you do, there is a tendancy based on experience to believe that it will continue to do so. Though as with everything on a boat, your guard is never fully down. At least it shouldn't be.

And Mark is so right - GET SLEEP!
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Old 16-08-2011, 07:47   #36
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

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Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Oh PuLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESe go play in a thread thats done that to death by mental pygmies.





First point: Don't get tired! Start out as if you have already been out 24 hours. Start getting sleep immediately. A 5 minute catnap is better than nothing and once your body is attuned to it you are fine. If you can't catnap then stop moving, lie down and pretend to be asleep.

Never sleep up a tree because its uncomfortable. So only sleep in the cockpit if its comfortable (or you're just doing a 5 min nap with a ship close). If its cold and wet go below! How hard is it? You are still closer to the helm than a ships officer when he's at the wrong end of the bridge.

Coastal/Far off shore: Sure offshore is safest; but if cruising the coast still GET SLEEP. Stop being a twit and learn to asses ships tracks better. It can be done so get your own skills up to where you can still have a nap when there's ships about. I have even napped when they are heading towards me because I have worked out their speed. You are a fool to stay up for 2 hours when you should have realised the ship was taking 2 hours to get to you.

Staying awake for 24 hours is stupid and foolish! What does the CIA do interrogate someone? SLEEP DEPRIVATION!!!!!!!!!

Screwing with sleep screws your mind. So use your brain and sleep.

The photo below is a plotter on the cockpit table lined fore and aft. Course on the dial. When you clearly see a ship put Blue Tack on its bearing. Then DON'T look for 5 minutes. Then take another bearing. Then a third or more but only at 5 min intervals. If the Blue Tack ends up in a pile you are going to hit the ship and die.


Solo is easy if you take you hand outta your pants, turn your brain on and skill up!



Mark
Thanks Mark. I haven't been out overnight solo, but I have experienced exhaustion when out overnight with one crew member -- largely because the day prior was not treated as a shorthanded cruise (getting sleep early on) and we were both left exhausted. So I can relate to that experience. In fact, it is that doublehanded experience that makes me so hesitant to set out solo. The time is coming though . . ..

I like the plotter.
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Old 16-08-2011, 07:48   #37
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Mark, I think you missed my point, as I pretty much agree with everything you said. I just advocate mitigating the risk and getting plenty if sleep.
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Old 16-08-2011, 08:06   #38
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

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Originally Posted by nv5l View Post
Mark, I think you missed my point, as I pretty much agree with everything you said. I just advocate mitigating the risk and getting plenty if sleep.
OK, sorry, Don. I thought you were digging up a all solo sailors are idiots thing...

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Old 16-08-2011, 08:15   #39
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

Short Answer = No magic solution

Long answer = try and make the boat as easy / less tiring to handle (or simply live on), bouncing around on your ear may be fun and may even add some speed (?) but a more sedate (and level!) pace can make life more pleasant onboard - especially over the longer run.

Eat well.

And a comfy seat in the cockpit.
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Old 16-08-2011, 08:37   #40
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No worries. I'm anchored in Oyster Bay and preparing to singlehanded down south right now. She's close, but I still need to move some stuff around and route lines etc.
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Old 16-08-2011, 08:45   #41
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
While human senses are good.....lack of sleep can make electronics even more important...most electronic devices are far superior to human senses and instinct if used in the appropriate manner.
Sounds good on paper but reality should be considered.

Thousands of vessels DON'T appear on radar.

CARD looks over the horizan and will drive you crazy picking up radar signals from every direction.

Few have AIS.

Mark just did a solo Alantic crossing. I'd take his advice.
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Old 16-08-2011, 08:53   #42
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

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No worries. I'm anchored in Oyster Bay and preparing to singlehanded down south right now. She's close, but I still need to move some stuff around and route lines etc.
Nice place to be about now.
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Old 16-08-2011, 09:02   #43
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

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Sounds good on paper but reality should be considered.

Thousands of vessels DON'T appear on radar.

CARD looks over the horizan and will drive you crazy picking up radar signals from every direction.

Few have AIS.

Mark just did a solo Alantic crossing. I'd take his advice.
Maybe coastal but offshore it's nothing like that. In my experience round the atlantic anyway. Empty, very few ships, about 1 a week last passage. All transmit ais, all big with good radar echo. That was my reality anyway, watch them change course 10 deg on ais to give you more room the change course back again. Then back to sleep.
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Old 16-08-2011, 09:24   #44
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

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Sounds good on paper but reality should be considered.

Thousands of vessels DON'T appear on radar.

CARD looks over the horizan and will drive you crazy picking up radar signals from every direction.

Few have AIS.

Mark just did a solo Alantic crossing. I'd take his advice.
Every pilot knows a trusted, diligent co-pilot is worth his/her weight in gold as a backup/second set of eyes...

When you are solo....good electronics can do just that...to NOT have and use them if you can afford them is even more dumb than betting TOO much on them.

Take his advice???? If you read back I said all good stuff....but that doesn't mean I don't have similar, different and/or even better experiences offshore....
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Old 16-08-2011, 09:39   #45
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Re: Single-Hander on Watch

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Take his advice???? If you read back I said all good stuff....but that doesn't mean I don't have similar, different and/or even better experiences offshore....
Please don't take general comments on an international forum personally, thanks
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