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Old 03-05-2016, 17:28   #16
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Self taught sailing

I figure if the Wrights could learn to fly self taught, I could learn to sail, if I stall the boat, nothing drastic happens
The first boat I had ever sailed was our IP 38. Of course I would learn faster with some instruction and will soon seek some for the wife, just because I don't think she will listen to me, or actually some professional instruction will likely help us both, and I think she will take to instruction better from someone other than me.
I haven't really watched much YouTube, I have read a little, but to me sailing is intuitive, I guess maybe because in a way , your "flying" the sails, especially the headsail, unless downwind of course.
Now I had previous larger powerboat experience and of course lots of training in Meteorology from a flying career, so I knew boat handling and basic seamanship, it was the sailing experience that was completely new to me.

Would I be a better sailer if I had come up the the ranks starting with dinghies and then maybe beach Cats, done some racing etc? Of course I would have, no doubt about it, but I'm no teenager and if I don't get this thing going soon, I fear I would have waited too long.

My wife said the other day that she could tell I wasn't in love with the boat, that I was in love with the idea of not going to work anymore, and she was right, I enjoy sailing, but to me it's a means to an end, the end being able to retire and travel and be able to afford a decent standard of living, and have something to keep me busy. A boat fills those needs.

I desire to travel long distances, and with what I can afford to spend, that means a sailboat. So I ended up being a wanna be Sailor in a rather round about fashion.



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Old 03-05-2016, 18:00   #17
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Re: Self taught sailing

I've had very few lessons... long ago and just getting back into it.

That leaves me not properly explaining an issue I want advice about how to solve because I misuse the terminology. (but I think I got the answer now)

You can learn just from books, videos and practice. Use a small boat that you can flip over and get back upright easily, because you'll be flipping it when you make mistakes.
With a SunFish or similar in warm water, flipping it is half the fun anyway.

Yes, lessons will help you learn faster.
Learn from the mistakes of others. Most of the lessons are designed to help you not make the same mistakes.
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Old 03-05-2016, 21:10   #18
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Re: Self taught sailing

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I figure if the Wrights could learn to fly self taught, I could learn to sail, ...

Sent from my iPad Pro using Cruisers Sailing Forum

a64pilot, I'm just now reading David McCullough's book, The Wright Brothers. Quite fascinating and more complex than my school text books described. I'll bet they would have been good sailors...then again they might have preferred a multihull.


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Old 03-05-2016, 22:35   #19
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Re: Self taught sailing

The Wright Brothers in a MULITHULL!! You have got to be kidding! There were no training wheels on their bicycles so why would they consider them on a flying machine?
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Old 03-05-2016, 23:54   #20
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Re: Self taught sailing

Biplane.😉


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Old 04-05-2016, 00:53   #21
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Re: Self taught sailing

A64Pilot,

Since the two of youse are a couple, why not send the wife to one school, and you get the heck out of the way at another one. Then come back and compare notes? Probably help the both of you quite a lot.

I think that for people who are approaching retirement, who have learned to get all they can out of structured learning situations, the lessons give you a leg up. Your own understanding of flying will indeed help you, you'll visualize the pressure differences on the sides of the sails, the airflow, and that's a real gift. You're a pretty physical guy, so you'll have an easy time with feeling what the wind's doing, furthermore short hair lets you feel keenly exactly where the breeze is from, one's whole body is a sensor, but I think you already know that..... Maybe your good lady does, too.

IME, women learn best in groups of women, and having you away makes her not so afraid of losing face [with her partner] to ask questions.

All success to both of you.

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Old 04-05-2016, 04:04   #22
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Re: Self taught sailing

I'm 73 years old and started teaching myself to sail 60 years ago. I'm almost finished after tens of thousands of miles in all types of conditions I am still learning. My best advice as you start out is to cover up all of your instruments, get it moving, get it moving faster and in the direction you want to go all by feel and instinct. Then uncover the instruments. And read everything you can find, but remember half of it is crap.
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Old 04-05-2016, 04:53   #23
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Re: Self taught sailing

My suggestion is to READ. And put telltales on your sails.

Any knucklehead can post a UTube video! Written texts have more credibility, not saying they are perfect. Just more credible.

Since a sail is an airfoil, only by knowing how the air is moving across the foil can you tell how effective your trim is. The only way to gauge that is telltails. IMHO, that is the difference between pulling strings to make the boat move, and sailing.
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Old 04-05-2016, 04:59   #24
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Re: Self taught sailing

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My suggestion is to READ. And put telltales on your sails.

Any knucklehead can post a UTube video! Written texts have more credibility, not saying they are perfect. Just more credible.

Since a sail is an airfoil, only by knowing how the air is moving across the foil can you tell how effective your trim is. The only way to gauge that is telltails. IMHO, that is the difference between pulling strings to make the boat move, and sailing.
in my boat instructions also says to minimise any turbulence after wind leaves sail.

Turbulence generated after wind leaves sail, slows the boat.

telltales will not say that.
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Old 04-05-2016, 05:27   #25
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Re: Self taught sailing

I believe anybody can learn basic sailing by themselves.
I'm self taught as well - boat, cottage, bunch of us kids.....Couple years later took a youth summer racing program at the local YC. Started sailing at 10 or 11 by 16 owned my first dingy. First couple summers were self taught for sure.
On the other hand I've sailed with a self taught woman who made up her own names for everything on her boat. Learned a new very messed sailing vocabulary that day! She figures her boat - she can name anything what she wants. Don't sail with her anymore, too frustrating!
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:03   #26
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Re: Self taught sailing

I started sailing back in the early 70's. I had absolutely no clue as to what I was doing. Mostly learned on an Albacore by trial and error. Should have read some books. Wish there was such a thing as YouTube back then.

Then I got into hang gliding and learned how a wing works. Later I had a revelation that a sail is just a wing turned sideways. Now sailing began to make sense.

The best learning tool I had was when I started crewing on different racing boats. The amount of knowledge to be gained was incredible. You will learn lots about sail trim and how to make a boat go fast. You also learn how to fly a spinnaker in adverse conditions. Mostly because everyone else in the race is so you have to also.

Been sailing for over 40 years now and still learning something new each time. It is a great sport/lifestyle to pursue as often as you can, and for as long as you can. It is one of the most relaxing, terrifying, joyful, hateful things to do.
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:09   #27
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Re: Self taught sailing

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in my boat instructions also says to minimise any turbulence after wind leaves sail.

Turbulence generated after wind leaves sail, slows the boat.

telltales will not say that.
Telltales on the leech help with that.......
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:13   #28
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Re: Self taught sailing

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The best learning tool I had was when I started crewing on different racing boats. The amount of knowledge to be gained was incredible. You will learn lots about sail trim and how to make a boat go fast. You also learn how to fly a spinnaker in adverse conditions. Mostly because everyone else in the race is so you have to also.
That's a good way but racing as Skipper doubles (or triples) the knowledge gained......especially on a singlehanded racing boat (with a spinnaker)

Example: Think about getting the spinnaker down coming into the downwind mark in traffic on a singlehanded sailboat and going back upwind

The cool thing about running a spinnaker on a racing boat that can hit speeds in the high teens to mid 20's is you sail it very similar to upwind except opposite especially to keep from flipping. It gets interesting though in gusty conditions because then you have to watch for the gusts coming from behind the boat and be able to react early so you don't pitchpole
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:27   #29
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Re: Self taught sailing

One of many youtube channels..

https://www.youtube.com/user/mdschoolofsailing
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:38   #30
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Re: Self taught sailing

There is sailing and cruising, sailors are not necessarily good cruisers and cruisers are not necessarily good sailors. You can learn anything you want by teaching yourself if that's what you like to do. Someone can show you something in 5 minutes that it might take you an hours reading so it's up to you how quick you want to learn something. If you really want to learn to sail get out on a race boat and start by crewing. If your a good observer and your with a good crew you will learn tons as well as have good times. Good cruisers have learned a detailed skillset that allows them to safely cross oceans and the skills to sail in a variety of conditions, all the while maintaining their boat and properly provisioning it. Many real good cruisers are marginal sailors at best but always get where they are going safely if not slowly. Sailing is like flying, you never quit learning and that's one of the really attractive aspects to this lifestyle.
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