Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 22-12-2010, 18:18   #16
Registered User
 
High Heels's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Annapolis, Maryland
Boat: 1978 44 foot Camper & Nicholsons Ketch
Posts: 342
For all intents and purposes, I am a racing sailor and have not graduated to a cruising sailor yet. I have two sets of racing t-shirts from my racing days in college complete with sweat stains...

Rebel Heart's post kind of made me chuckle in regards to how hard many racing sailors push their boats...I guess in reference to these poor folks who witnessed their beautiful racing machines washing up on the shore, not so funny...

My t-shirts have brought me nothing but luck so far...think it is less the matching t-shirts and more in regards to the crew aboard...
__________________

__________________
High Heels is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-12-2010, 18:20   #17
Registered User
 
High Heels's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Annapolis, Maryland
Boat: 1978 44 foot Camper & Nicholsons Ketch
Posts: 342
And the vast majority of racing sailors I have known ROCK!
__________________

__________________
High Heels is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-12-2010, 18:28   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Geismar, LA near Baton Rouge
Boat: Vamos, a Ranger 28 Tall Rig
Posts: 145
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by High Heels View Post
And the vast majority of racing sailors I have known ROCK!
__________________
WillJacocks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-12-2010, 18:51   #19
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,455
Quote:
Originally Posted by High Heels View Post
And the vast majority of racing sailors I have known ROCK!
HH,

Since "graduating" from racing (20+years) to cruising, I find that we try very hard NOT to rock, or mud, or sand...!

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Church Point, NSW, Oz
__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-12-2010, 22:19   #20
Registered User
 
bewitched's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 885
Images: 3
racers vs cruisers - two sides of the same coin isn't it?

It's like the multi vs mono debate - I didn't actually realise there was a fence to be on one side of until I came to this website.

I just called everyone sailors before
__________________
bewitched is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-12-2010, 23:37   #21
Registered User
 
cat man do's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia [until the boats launched]
Boat: 50ft powercat, light,long and low powered
Posts: 4,409
Images: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weyalan View Post
The poor holding in that area is well known. Most of the race boats carried a plenty heavy anchor that they would leave in position, with a fender or float attached while they went off racing.
Had a few beers yesterday with a guy who races on one of the boats, but not this series.
he said the owner of the boat he would have been on knew about the weather well in advance, organized a much larger anchor and more chain and anchored well out with no problems whatsoever.

Seems most of the boats were in close to me, which seems a bit silly as they have to get in a bloody dinghy anyway, so what's another 50-100 metres?
__________________
"Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you a yacht large enough to pull up right alongside it"...............David Lee Roth
Long Distance Motorboat Cruising Ė It Is Possible on a Small Budget
cat man do is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 03:11   #22
Registered User
 
felixqld66's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Phuket Thailand for the moment
Boat: Landfall 39 built 1982
Posts: 138
Well this is my first post after taking delivery of my boat Wildflower in Phuket my very first night at anchor was this night in this anchorage I can only go on my observations and bar talk in the analysis of the whole situation.

I spent my very first night on my boat a 39ft Ron Amy Landfall doing laps of the boat bow to stern and checking the distance from nearby boats.depth and position every 30mins as my alarm went off. Quite the trial by fire scarey when you don't know your boat its gear and its your first anchorage!!!!!

I set the boat in 12m of water with 40m of chain out on the 45lb/ 20kg CQR I went further out than most only one boat anchored further out they arrived late dropped anchor way to close and jumped ship for the bar.

Of the boats washed ashore only one had crew on it. The surf zone the next morning was too rough for many to return to there boats tenders getting swamped and rolled everywhere and a couple of the large RIBs one from a massive ketch super yacht and the Thai navy were lending a hand to get those who wanted to high tail it out to there boats and get them away.

About 6am that morning the line on my tender snapped off (washed it way ashore and flipped in the breakers....a lesson there! ) When the weather began to drop and the boat had been stable for the whole night I hitched a ride back to shore and found the tender had been dragged up on the beach and yachts in the process of being smashed up to varying extents an Elan 34 rolled over and was smashed to bits, Beneteau 44 had its rudder punched through the hull ( it took on so much sand that it broke the crane that tried to lift it out of the sand a few days later)

To generalise and this may get me in trouble I think most anchored too close to the beach didn't monitor the weather either by report or in realtime and some boats didn't have the leeway for errors in anchoring.

I made some mistakes on my first anchorage..... ie too close to people not allowing for the swing, I had defaulted to a more experienced friend and should have gone with my gut from the start but did move the boat later after being informed in no uncertain manor that it was too close...and a fair call too I am always happy to take a dressing down when I deserve it. It did mean however that I ended up in a safer place and came away from the night with my boat not on the beach.

I will try to post some picks..... so many lessons what a way to learn but it has given me an insight into my little boat
__________________
felixqld66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 04:23   #23
Registered User
 
s/v Moondancer's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Fiji but heading for Alaska
Boat: Tayana 55
Posts: 1,225
Bewitched,

The division is between sailing and seamanship!

My wife and I were caught in similar circumstances and rapidly deteriorating conditions on a mooring off Georgetown Grand Cayman two weeks ago.

My wife reaction was "lets get to sea before it becomes really dangerous!"

At dawn we were close in, held beam-to the waves by the wind and only 50 yds from the reef. A fine piece of boat handling by Nell, at the wheel, got the boat pointing out; she used hard reverse and a breaking wave to turn us into the wave train as I slipped the lines from the mooring. She then powered through the waves and out to sea.

Had we been anchored we would have buoyed and slipped the the anchor as we would never have been able to retrieve it in the prevailing conditions.

And that is why I prefer to sail with Nell rather than any racer I have ever met! She can't trim the sails like them but she sure does have more seamanship and nautical common sense. And she truly understands that 99% of the time being at sea is safer than being near the land.
__________________
Phil

"Remember, experience only means that you screw-up less often."
s/v Moondancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 05:07   #24
Registered User
 
NotQuiteLost's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Paradise (better known to most people as: Philippines)
Boat: 65' Custom Steel Ketch
Posts: 322
Images: 4
Great story, Phil. Reminds me of the scene in 13th Warrior, when Antonion Banderas' character Ahmed is huddled amidships on a Viking boat, and they're getting pretty well pounded by wind, wave and rain. He finally screws up the courage to ask/suggest "Shouldn't we be closer to land?!"

The Viking laughs, and says "No, boy. This is no day to be close to land!"

Some people get it, most don't. I think it's more to do with how you're wired than what you've learned/experienced.
NotQuiteLost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 06:00   #25
Registered User
 
s/v Moondancer's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Fiji but heading for Alaska
Boat: Tayana 55
Posts: 1,225
Thanks NQL...I have just watched the video and I hope that the less experienced realize that those were not bad conditions the real problem was bad seamanship!
__________________
Phil

"Remember, experience only means that you screw-up less often."
s/v Moondancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 06:05   #26
Registered User
 
bewitched's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 885
Images: 3
Moondancer,

There are some very, very experienced sailors who race.

There are also some very, very inexperienced sailors who cruise.

Just because an individual enjoys racing, it doesn't automatically follow that they are inexperienced in anything else or lack common sense.
__________________
bewitched is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 09:30   #27
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Santa Cruz
Boat: Boatless Again
Posts: 4,324
Having raced boat for over 50 years and cruised for 15, I can tell you that most race boat crews don't get enough practice anchoring, and their gear is chosen on weight rather than holding power.

If Felix's boat held on a CQR with only 3.5:1 scope, conditions weren't that bad. Knowing that there MIGHT be an onshore wind would have me at 5:1 chain with an 8 meter snubber. Once conditions started to deteriorate there would have been an anchor watch.
__________________
donradcliffe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 14:41   #28
Registered User
 
felixqld66's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Phuket Thailand for the moment
Boat: Landfall 39 built 1982
Posts: 138
Hey Don

Being new to this and my only sailing experience being racing dingys and cats I am interested in learning from my experiences, maybe you could fill me in on this "snubber" concept.

"Knowing that there MIGHT be an onshore wind would have me at 5:1 chain with an 8 meter snubber."

I had all the chain out that I had, I now have a second anchor with 30m of chain and 60m of rode. I would have put out a second anchor if I had it available at the time when the weather started to deteriorate at around 22.00.

Cheers Alex
__________________
felixqld66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 16:28   #29
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Santa Cruz
Boat: Boatless Again
Posts: 4,324
Here is a pretty good explanation of snubbers Snubbers (Rocna Knowledge Base) the whole idea is that when your boat pulls the chain tight (either by wave action or when the boat sails back and forth in strong winds) the snubber will stretch and reduced the maximum load on the anchor.

If a nylon rode is spliced into your chain it will serve the same purpose as a separate snubber if you let out nylon to at least half the length of your boat. However, if you let out more nylon than the depth of the water, you may have problems with the rode chafing on rocks etc.
__________________
donradcliffe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-12-2010, 20:51   #30
Registered User
 
felixqld66's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Phuket Thailand for the moment
Boat: Landfall 39 built 1982
Posts: 138
Hey Don

My keyboard is playing up so sorry about the unfinished message , thanks for the heads up lots to learn. I will put some time into practising setting up a snubber. At least i get a second chance unlike some less fortunate.

Cheers Alex
__________________

__________________
felixqld66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
No Tether Ashore ? Hudson Force Liveaboard's Forum 9 03-08-2010 10:21
One Way to Get Ashore . . . David M Off Topic Forum 2 29-07-2010 06:11
Life Ashore delmarrey The Sailor's Confessional 28 05-11-2007 14:30
Reporting Ashore Sunspot Baby Sailor Logs & Cruising Plans 4 03-06-2006 09:00
Ashore in Baltimore CaptainK Atlantic & the Caribbean 0 30-04-2006 08:57



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:57.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.