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Old 02-07-2008, 14:11   #31
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To quickly center the rudder in the slip:
Count how many revolutions the wheel makes when positioning the rudder from stop to stop. Half of that is centered.

Ex: 2 1/2 turns from stop to stop means 1 1/4 turns from either stop = centered.
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Old 02-07-2008, 17:28   #32
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good deal

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Originally Posted by CaptainJeff View Post
To quickly center the rudder in the slip:
Count how many revolutions the wheel makes when positioning the rudder from stop to stop. Half of that is centered.

Ex: 2 1/2 turns from stop to stop means 1 1/4 turns from either stop = centered.
thanks for the help

jc
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Old 02-07-2008, 17:41   #33
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I still recommend practicing pirouettes. You never know when you are going to need to turn your boat around in close quarters...
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Old 02-07-2008, 18:06   #34
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I second the suggestion of practicing pirouettes. I've done them on Catalina and Newport 30s, Catlina 32s, a Hunter 33, and Beneteau a 40 and 44. The Hunter was the most surprising in that it took a few shots to get her around in the narrow channel. I am guessing it had a smaller rudder than other boats, including the Catalina 320s, which turn on a dime. In any case, it's good to know the turning characteristics of the boat.
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Old 02-07-2008, 18:25   #35
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I would be very grateful if you could outline the pirouette technique.

jc
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Old 02-07-2008, 18:37   #36
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It's everything we've been discussing after the initial back out of the slip.

Basically stopping, then using reverse, forward, reverse, forward, and hard over rudder to spin around in one spot.
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Old 02-07-2008, 18:42   #37
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To be clear, this is not directly related to your original question about leaving your slip. It is intended to help you turn the boat around in smaller waterways. I don't know much about your boat or which way it turns better (sharper). The below is assuming a boat that turns sharper to the right:

1) With the boat in forward, approach a junction of two waterways at a reasonable speed from the far left side of the channel.

2) When you reach the junction, power down to idle, shift into netural, and turn the wheel hard left (all the way to the lock).

3) As the boat starts to turn, shift to reverse and apply power. This sucks the stern around. Do not let the boat start to move backwards.

4) Keep the wheel hard to left, shift into forward, and apply power.

With most boats, this allows you to turn the boat around in less than the length of the boat. With the Catalina 320s, I did not need to use reverse, but I did tell the crew on the foredeck to hang on. The 320s really turn! The Beneteaus and Catlina 320s turned better to the right. The Hunter didn't turn very well in either direction.

You should really have someone demonstrate this for you. It helps immensely.
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Old 02-07-2008, 18:55   #38
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AVSKIPPER, I think there are some mix ups in your lefts and rights. I think you just crashed him into the dock or sea wall.

He can't start from the left side of the channel and then turn left.

Note: He walks to stbd so a left (counter clockwise) turn would be best, but I would think from the right side of the channel.
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Old 03-07-2008, 00:03   #39
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Come on guys, the answer to this question is simple, well documented, and suggested above, repeat after me: SPRING LINE!!!!!

Why on earth do people feel like using lines to turn a boat is somehow "cheating"? It is a approach that has been used for thousands of years. If you don't know how sign up a a GOOD local sailing school and they will teach you.

"Piouetting" a boat (known as a "back and fill" to sailors) can work with some boats under some conditions, and should be learned, but spring lines ALWAYS work.
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Old 03-07-2008, 05:54   #40
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Thats what the bow thruster is for.

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I still recommend practicing pirouettes. You never know when you are going to need to turn your boat around in close quarters...
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Old 03-07-2008, 05:55   #41
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Yep, we sometimes cannot get the boat off the dock if the wind has us pinned unless we spring it off. Either backing against a spring to pop the bow out or spring around the dock end to spin the stern out.

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Come on guys, the answer to this question is simple, well documented, and suggested above, repeat after me: SPRING LINE!!!!!

Why on earth do people feel like using lines to turn a boat is somehow "cheating"? It is a approach that has been used for thousands of years. If you don't know how sign up a a GOOD local sailing school and they will teach you.

"Piouetting" a boat (known as a "back and fill" to sailors) can work with some boats under some conditions, and should be learned, but spring lines ALWAYS work.
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Old 03-07-2008, 09:32   #42
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my two cents

Is similar to Capt. Jeff. Short full thrusts of power will get the vessel to respond. It isn't like driving a car where you put it in reverse and give it gas. Put it in reverse and throttle full for a second or two, then back down to idle, then do it another time or two as required as you back out. Then put it in forward (pausing in neutral for a second) and turn the rudder as need and give a couple of short full power thrusts. The vessel will respond. A lot people get nervous when around the pier or other vessels and are shy with the throttle, but a boat needs the throttle to move. I see people leaning out trying to push themselves off another boat, when all they needed to do was use some throttle.

There are times when a spring line is needed, because wind and current just won't let you get off the dock, but it shouldn't be relied on every time.

You also have to question how often those bow-in boats make it out. I personally back my boat in because of similar reasons as you. All other boats down my line are bow-in, but my boat is sailing every Saturday/Sunday and sometimes during the week, nearly all year round (Florida weather is great). So I do what makes life easiest on me. Plus I often have transients and dock walkers tell me it was cool seeing me back in, cause they can't get their boat to respond well enough to back in. Truth is, they probably just don't have the practice. Practice makes perfect (or at least perfect enough to where it looks like you know what you are doing).
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Old 03-07-2008, 10:19   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene :^) View Post
AVSKIPPER, I think there are some mix ups in your lefts and rights. I think you just crashed him into the dock or sea wall.

He can't start from the left side of the channel and then turn left.

Note: He walks to stbd so a left (counter clockwise) turn would be best, but I would think from the right side of the channel.

Correct. Sorry about that. From the far left of the channel, turn the wheel hard right. For some reason, I cannot edit that post to correct it.

1) With the boat in forward, approach a junction of two waterways at a reasonable speed from the far left side of the channel.

2) When you reach the junction, power down to idle, shift into netural, and turn the wheel hard right (all the way to the lock).

3) As the boat starts to turn, shift to reverse and apply power. This sucks the stern around. Do not let the boat start to move backwards.

4) Keep the wheel hard to right, shift into forward, and apply power.
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