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Old 06-02-2016, 20:16   #46
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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Originally Posted by Kenomac View Post
Our hull speed is 9 knots and we were making a steady 7.5-8 knots as I recall, so no need for any more or less sail. The ride was comfortable, not unpleasant, probably just about the right amount of heel. If the staysail furling line was 100% operational and not missing a very key 1 foot of cover where it passes through a block, we probably would have just flown the staysail, but... using only the less than 25% main worked out just fine, the helm was well balanced. Heading into the wind our boat definitely requires the jib, but on that point of sail, we were fine. The cockpit instruments are working well except for the knot meter which I never clean. We use GPS for speed. Our wind speed indicator is very accurate, I've compared it to my hand held many times.
The ride did look comfortable in the vid, remarkably so given the conditions actually. Kinda hard to see, but it looked like the knot meter was far left, and there was what I thought might be wind speed second over from the right. But whatever, making 7.5-8 kts. with a comfortable helm means you had a good sail configuration.

I like how the fwd edge of your bimini meets up with the top of the dodger. Mine has a big gap (when I have the bimini up) which often means a wet helm on my CC boat.
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Old 06-02-2016, 20:23   #47
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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I like how the fwd edge of your bimini meets up with the top of the dodger. Mine has a big gap (when I have the bimini up) which often means a wet helm on my CC boat.
There's a ten inch gap between the Bimini and the sprayhood (dodger in American) on our boat without the clear connector in place... another regret forgetting to put it in place beforehand.

I got soaked taking spray over the sprayhood through the gap, as demonstrated at the very end of the video.
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Old 06-02-2016, 20:31   #48
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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There's a ten inch gap between the Bimini and the sprayhood (dodger in American) on our boat without the clear connector in place... another regret forgetting to put it in place beforehand.

I got soaked taking spray over the sprayhood through the gap, as demonstrated at the very end of the video.
I missed seeing that gap but will look again. Think I could use that clear connector you mentioned. But then I don't often sail with the bimini up anyway.
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Old 06-02-2016, 20:47   #49
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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Originally Posted by SaltyMonkey View Post
hates the music. I wanted to hear the howl of the wind only.
Well.... You asked for it.
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Old 06-02-2016, 21:18   #50
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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Ken: Nice video. Thanks for sharing.

All: Seems to me that the best method for estimating wave height at sea is to position ones eye (or camera lens) at the height at which the wave tops JUST meet the distant horizon when the boat is in the troughs. Wave height will then be roughly equal to the camera height above water line. Boat pitching or plunging may make the above inaccurate so the best position for the eye (or camera) is probably amidships.

A video camera is probably the best tool for the above analysis as one can review the data later, and in a relaxed state of mind.

In the video below, the camera is consistently at about 6 feet above waterline. A few of the waves just block the horizon, with the one at 0:34 being the most prominent. I estimate this wave train at 4 to 6 feet.

Steve
Yep, thats about the only way to get something near accurate, and it seems to give a result close to about half what you would think the wave height actually really is.

A few times I've climbed the ratlines or onto the cabin top to get a accurate idea of the true wave height, its amazing how as you go up in height the horizon suddenly becomes mostly clear except for the odd exceptional peak.

on ships we walk down the decks until the same thing happens, or hopefully, if we have to go up to the monkey island we know we are in big trouble!

Since you guys are all posting rough water videos, i'll post my best shot here, halfway to Chile from the NZ Sub Antarctic islands on a 64 foot schooner.

I think the wind was around 50 knots average on the windspeed graph, but it didn't feel like a real 50 knots and I don't trust the accuracy of the windspeed gauges at all so I reckon it was nearer 40. The waves were mostly pretty small, maybe 4-5 meters from memory, with the odd bigger set. Ive got some video of her hove too someplace I think.
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Old 06-02-2016, 21:19   #51
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

I too especially enjoyed the video
because of having a person in the
frame. Looked kinda fun. Thanks.
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Old 06-02-2016, 21:26   #52
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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I too especially enjoyed the video
because of having a person in the
frame. Looked kinda fun. Thanks.
That person is steady-as-she-goes "Irongut" Pam.
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Old 06-02-2016, 22:44   #53
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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..But whatever, making 7.5-8 kts. with a comfortable helm means you had a good sail configuration.
...
The original post says they were motoring, so they may have been under canvassed or not balanced.
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Old 06-02-2016, 23:38   #54
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

Nice vid. Our 1st trip was across the Tasman and we got Force 9 with waves predicted to be 6m to 8m and looking crest to crest it did look as though a two storied house would fit under the line. We had gusts to 54knots. I took no photos because looking through the lense it there was nothing to see.(Kids said I should have had a go-pro.)
Like you we had a 24 tonne boat and my wife who doesn't want to be a sailor was in the aft cabin knitting! Bigger is best.
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Old 07-02-2016, 00:18   #55
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

Ken, if you had had time to set a storm jib or storm trysail, do you think it would have been of any advantage?
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Old 07-02-2016, 02:27   #56
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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While crossing the Strait of Bonifacio in late September 2015 on our Oyster 53 sailing yacht, we encountered Force 9.5 sustained (40-50 knot) winds and 20-25 foot (7-8 meter) seas. We expected 38 knots while threading the needle between two storm fronts, but instead... we got a little more.

Please enjoy the ride!

I know some folks will be curious as to what preparations we made and the sails used, so here goes...

Since the seas were going to be behind us or broadside, we had only our main sail up furled to less than 25%, and chose to have the staysail ready but to not use it unless we absolutely needed to do so. Our staysail furling line had issues and it was somewhat doubtful that I'd be able to furl in the sail. The 100hp Yanmar engine was running at 2200rpm (40-50hp) mainly to aid with steering. Mostly, we were surfing.

The Strait of Bonifacio is the passage between Corsica and Sardinia in the Mediterranean Sea.
Great Vid, mate, and DID like the music (What was it by the way?) Just one thing: a little surprised to see the bimini up in that, and perhaps more surprised to see it doing so well!
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Old 07-02-2016, 02:29   #57
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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Ken, if you had had time to set a storm jib or storm trysail, do you think it would have been of any advantage?
Hi there,

Generally the inmast reefing main (which in effect is a trysail, as loose footed and of infinite gear) and part reefed (or even not if high and flat cut) staysail will be fine for an Oyster such as this. My stormsails are just that. My stay is high/flat cut spectra. Has been fine in many a blow.
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Old 07-02-2016, 03:05   #58
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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Hi there,

Generally the inmast reefing main (which in effect is a trysail, as loose footed and of infinite gear) and part reefed (or even not if high and flat cut) staysail will be fine for an Oyster such as this. My stormsails are just that. My stay is high/flat cut spectra. Has been fine in many a blow.
Indeed. In-mast furling main really comes into its own in conditions like this, because it makes a perfect storm try when reefed right down. The staysails on these rigs are extra heavy cloth specifically to allow dual use as storm jibs. So you have a perfect storm rig with CE low and central. Mine is self-tacking (IIRC MF's has normal sheets; I don't know about Ken's), which is a curse for sail trim, but a real blessing for such conditions as these -- the whole rig becomes self-tacking.

So no extra sails required for storm duty on those big Oysters, or on boats rigged like mine. I do have a blade jib (which replaces the normal yankee principle headsail) for going upwind in strong conditions, short of storm conditions (so up to 35 knots or so).


Concerning partially furling the staysail in a blow -- I've never done it once on my boat despite countless passages in gale conditions. I've never even tried it; the shape is bad enough already without reefing it . In really strong weather (over 50 knots), I have put away the mainsail and used the staysail alone, however, or downwind, I might even put both main and staysail away and put out just a scrap of the principle headsail -- to get the CE as far forward as possible for stability and broach-proofing. That's what we were doing on the North Sea last May.


I was also impressed with how smooth the ride was on Ken's boat. Those extra tons of weight are a big plus in such conditions. As someone above said (I think) when the going gets tough, you'll never wish for a smaller, or lighter boat, in strong weather. My boat is stiff and strong, but lighter than Ken's, and so the motion is not as good in such conditions. I'll try to dig up a video.


My advice to Ken, though, would be to be careful about using the main alone in strong weather -- I know his boat is extremely stable and has a huge rudder, but when it's really blowing you don't want the CE of the sail plan behind the keel, so that the wind is trying to push you around your keel and broach you. If this happens while you're surfing down a big wave it can ruin your whole day!
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Old 07-02-2016, 03:24   #59
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Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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Indeed. In-mast furling main really comes into its own in conditions like this, because it makes a perfect storm try when reefed right down. The staysails on these rigs are extra heavy cloth specifically to allow dual use as storm jibs. So you have a perfect storm rig with CE low and central. Mine is self-tacking (IIRC MF's has normal sheets; I don't know about Ken's), which is a curse for sail trim, but a real blessing for such conditions as these -- the whole rig becomes self-tacking.

So no extra sails required for storm duty on those big Oysters, or on boats rigged like mine. I do have a blade jib (which replaces the normal yankee principle headsail) for going upwind in strong conditions, short of storm conditions (so up to 35 knots or so).


Concerning partially furling the staysail in a blow -- I've never done it once on my boat despite countless passages in gale conditions. I've never even tried it; the shape is bad enough already without reefing it . In really strong weather (over 50 knots), I have put away the mainsail and used the staysail alone, however, or downwind, I might even put both main and staysail away and put out just a scrap of the principle headsail -- to get the CE as far forward as possible for stability and broach-proofing. That's what we were doing on the North Sea last May.


I was also impressed with how smooth the ride was on Ken's boat. Those extra tons of weight are a big plus in such conditions. As someone above said (I think) when the going gets tough, you'll never wish for a smaller, or lighter boat, in strong weather. My boat is stiff and strong, but lighter than Ken's, and so the motion is not as good in such conditions. I'll try to dig up a video.


My advice to Ken, though, would be to be careful about using the main alone in strong weather -- I know his boat is extremely stable and has a huge rudder, but when it's really blowing you don't want the CE of the sail plan behind the keel, so that the wind is trying to push you around your keel and broach you. If this happens while you're surfing down a big wave it can ruin your whole day!
Yeah, to be fair I have never needed to part reef my stay in a blow, even a severe one. But mine is deliberately flat, blade like and high cut.
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Old 07-02-2016, 03:24   #60
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pirate Re: Oyster Yacht in Storm Video

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Any videos to share?
No... afraid not.. keep meaning to get a Go-Pro or something but not got round to it..
Gone through loads of phones coz I filmed something then left the phone exposed.. last time was my HT 26 delivery to the UK..
Woulda had some great Channel in a F8 with shipping all around..
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