Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 31-08-2010, 13:46   #1
Registered User
 
Jerry Woodward's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kentucky
Boat: PDQ 32 LRC
Posts: 278
Question Newbie Anchoring Question

I'm a relative newbie at anchoring--one bareboat charter out of St Martin under my belt. I really didn't have any major problems, but they weren't always pretty either. The main recurring problem I had was this scenario: I would pick a spot I wanted to be, head into the wind and pull about 150 feet ahead of that spot (depending on the scope desired), put the engine in neutral and signal the first mate to drop the anchor once we were stopped. Once the anchor was on the bottom, put in reverse and slowly back as she let out the rode. Here is where the problem arose. Invariably, the wind would push the bow one way or another and I found if very difficult to back in a straight line. So I would end up at 45 degrees or more from where I wanted to be, and setting the anchor at a 45 degree angle to the wind and from where the boat will be when the wind brings it around.

So, what am I missing? What is the correct technique?

Boat: Sun Oddysey 36i (Jeanneau), Danforth anchor, all chain rode, windlass, sand bottom.

Thanks

Jerry
__________________

__________________
Jerry Woodward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 14:01   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: St. Martin
Boat: St. Francis 43 Brisa
Posts: 333
Well you did it pretty right... I usually let the wind push me slowly downwind until I have out about 5 to 7 times the depth in anchor chain... ie. 10 feet deep... 70 feet of chain.

If it was that windy that you were being pushed around, just let the wind blow you. It will pretty much blow you straight downwind. The trick here is not to let too much anchor chain out and then let the wind slam the slack out of the chain. If you get off course just stop the chain and the wind will blow you back to the right position. Just let the wind blow you downwind with a little tension on the chain, this will keep you pointing into the wind. Once you have enough chain out, stop let the boat settle then lock off the chain and using the engine reverse pretty hard
__________________

__________________
sailingaway221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 14:01   #3
Registered User

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 319
The "correct technique" is the one that gets you where you want to be. Me, I don't worry about backing up in a straight line. Rather, I worry about backing in the direction I want to go. If the bow is 45 degrees off the wind, I would compensate by putting the rudder hard towards the direction I wanted to go and reverse the engine, thereby putting the stern in the place I want it. The wind will straighten out the boat relative to the rode when the anchor bites.
__________________
Drew13440 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 14:03   #4
Registered User
 
2ndstar's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Norfolk, VA
Boat: Herreshoff 45 Second Star
Posts: 46
Jerry, I typically just let the boat drift back while paying out the anchor. If you keep a little tension on the anchor as you are paying it out the bow will pivot towards the anchor. I don't reverse until I have all the scope I want out and I'm downwind/current of it.

Regards,
Carl
__________________
2ndstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 14:10   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
Vasco's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore" Ben393 "Breathless"
Posts: 7,138
No use backing up when you drop the hook. Just let the wind do the work and let out the rode. When you've got enough out snub it up. I prefer to have the bow drop off, then when you snub the chain up the bow will come around and you'll know your anchor's holding. Sometimes I'll back down on it then, it depends on how hard the wind is blowing and how fast I drop back. If you've dropped the hook in the right spot you'll end up where you want to be.
__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beneteau393/
Vasco is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 14:36   #6
Registered User
 
sabray's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Wash DC
Boat: PETERSON 44
Posts: 3,169
As a newbie your suppose to pick a spot a little to close and in front of another boat. You come in real fast when you see the right spot you pick the anchor up lift it over your head and throw it as hard as you can at the water........

when you are no longer a newbie the prior advice is good. If its windy let the boat drift. If its not then ease it back with the motor. Ill set mine by backing down if the bottom is questionable or the wind isnt loading the chain.
__________________
sabray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 15:14   #7
Registered User
 
Jerry Woodward's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kentucky
Boat: PDQ 32 LRC
Posts: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by sabray View Post
As a newbie your suppose to pick a spot a little to close and in front of another boat. You come in real fast when you see the right spot you pick the anchor up lift it over your head and throw it as hard as you can at the water........
.....while yelling at your first mate.
__________________
Jerry Woodward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 15:16   #8
Registered User
 
Jerry Woodward's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kentucky
Boat: PDQ 32 LRC
Posts: 278
Thanks all for the advice. It makes perfect sense to leave a little tension on the rode while the wind pushes you back.
__________________
Jerry Woodward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 15:21   #9
Registered User
 
sabray's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Wash DC
Boat: PETERSON 44
Posts: 3,169
yes yell at the first mate the anchor will hear this and know its such serious a matter that relationships are nearing ruin..

I should also add that when I anchor under sail occasionally I botch it and the wind will run the boat off at a horrible angle until I remember to release the main a bit and start getting it down on the boom. The boat will settle back once Ive got it sorted.
__________________
sabray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 15:30   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: SW Florida
Boat: FP Belize, 43' - Dot Dun
Posts: 3,431
Charter a cat next time, two engines allow you to back straight!!!


(I know, that was cheap shot! But it was sooo easy!)
__________________
DotDun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 15:33   #11
Registered User
 
Arch Stanton's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Olympia, WA
Boat: San Juan 28
Posts: 214
I'm still a newb as well. Here in the lower Puget Sound this time of year I find currents to be a much bigger complication than wind while anchoring. Whichever pulls the boat more is the one I head into, drop anchor and drift off from.
__________________
Arch Stanton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 15:45   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Vancouver, BC
Boat: Ta Chiao CT34 - 34' - The Brass Monkey
Posts: 81
Agree that currents can be a major factor, and will affect different hull shapes differently. It's not always as simple as just saying "the wind is there, I want to be downwind from point X, and so I'll drop the hook there". However, I think everyone's advice still holds true - it's just a question of calculating your drop point; we drop the anchor and pay out enough to be sure we're not just pulling the shank of the anchor off the bottom, then tension the rode enough to swing the stern wherever it's going to go (wind+current).

Hopefully looking at the angle of entry of the rodes of others in the immediate area will give you an idea of both the amount of scope they have out and the combined wind/current effect.

My $0.02... Lord knows I've been humbled plenty while anchoring...
__________________
RSMacG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 15:47   #13
Registered User
 
markpierce's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Central California
Boat: M/V Carquinez Coot
Posts: 3,415
What's the big deal about motoring backward? Done it lots of times on single-hull auxiliaries, although it is a bit easier if the motor is outboard because propeller orientation can be varied. Once the transmission on my 5 h.p. Sea Gull broke, leaving only neutral and reverse available. Did alright running backward in my pocket cutter up an extremely narrow channel to the marina even if it did look rediculous.
__________________
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 16:13   #14
Registered User
 
Jerry Woodward's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kentucky
Boat: PDQ 32 LRC
Posts: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by DotDun View Post
Charter a cat next time, two engines allow you to back straight!!!


(I know, that was cheap shot! But it was sooo easy!)
I would have loved to charter a cat but it didn't make sense for two people. However, after leaving a Leopard in my wake on a close reach to St Barths, I am re-thinking my original affinity toward cats.



(touche)
__________________
Jerry Woodward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 16:30   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: ft.myers,fl
Boat: rhodes,seafarer,28
Posts: 137
Most modern sailboat hulls tend to drift down wind beam to. When you take off all way ( come to a stop ) the boat will find equalibrium by turning abeam to the wind. This is usually not a problem as you will drift directly downwind to your intended anchoring spot where you will snub the anchor and the boat will snap into the wind. Now you can put the engine in reverse to drive the anchor in. By the way, why do you have the woman handeling the heavy anchor while you sit in the cockpit manipulating the engine controls with your fingers? Things might work out better if you reverse the roles. Give her a little credit,she can probibly work the engine controls nearly as well as you.
__________________

__________________
capt.bobfm is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
anchor, anchoring

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anchoring or Dock, That Is the Question. mgeanta007 Liveaboard's Forum 2 13-01-2010 12:46
Marquesas Key Anchoring Question Fortunaut Atlantic & the Caribbean 15 11-12-2009 15:09
Anchoring question mfeene01 Multihull Sailboats 18 11-08-2008 09:02
newbie question fenceguy2 Monohull Sailboats 14 29-05-2007 17:12
Anchoring question shellback Anchoring & Mooring 32 04-05-2007 22:45



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 17:16.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.