Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 01-10-2013, 08:05   #16
Senior Cruiser
 
colemj's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Presently on US East Coast
Boat: Manta 40 "Reach"
Posts: 10,049
Images: 12
Re: Most secure "slip" knot?

I have used that one before, but thought I made it up! That one definitely needs supervision because there is no load on the last slip loop, so it can easily fall out and then the whole thing unravels.

Mark
__________________

__________________
www.svreach.com

You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.
colemj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 12:46   #17
CF Adviser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Boat: Custom Van De Stadt 47 Samoa
Posts: 3,744
Re: Most secure "slip" knot?

Been busy . . . The application was dinghing out a large/heavy anchor. When they get over say 60lbs most of us will hang them from the dinghy transom, and untie or cut the rope when you are over your desired spot. If there is chop the anchor will bounce and swing. I have always just made up a knot on the spot was was curious what was "correct".

I have never done a slip knot on the piling. I usually take the line around the piling and back (both ends) to a cleat on Hawk. But I can see I lip knot might be useful in some specific situations - like when the piling is so rough the line will not run at all smoothly around it.
__________________

__________________
estarzinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 15:29   #18
Registered User
 
ryon's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 588
Re: Most secure "slip" knot?

This is far from your application, but the traditional way to release an anchor is by using a "trigger" line. From an attachment point on the cathead, the line goes down and thru the anchor ring, then back up and inboard over the cathead, down to a thumb cleat, then to a bitt or cleat. Take it down to a turn, and let go when ready.

Maybe you could hang your anchor from a spare line brought back to a cleat. Having the line doubled to different belays would divide the anchor's weight, and make the operation a lot easier on your hands.
__________________
ryon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 21:04   #19
Registered User
 
SV Sea Monkey's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Annapolis, MD
Boat: Island Packet 35
Posts: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by estarzinger View Post
Been busy . . . The application was dinghing out a large/heavy anchor. When they get over say 60lbs most of us will hang them from the dinghy transom, and untie or cut the rope when you are over your desired spot. If there is chop the anchor will bounce and swing. I have always just made up a knot on the spot was was curious what was "correct".
Evans,

I'm not sure what is "correct", but I seem to recall from a couple of decades ago lowering motor whale boats from a Navy ship with a quick-release on the sea painter--I can't recall the proper term or find a reference or photo right now for this method, but it could be adapted for your application like this:
Make a short rope fast to the dinghy, with a loop or spliced eye in the end. Pass the loop or eye through the anchor shackle or other convenient "hole" in the anchor and place a wooden fid or tapered belaying pin through the loop/eye to hold it. Snug everything up and let the line take the weight of the anchor. To release the anchor, simply pull out the fid/pin. With the right amount of taper and a strong pin, this should hold securely yet release reliably under load. As I recall, this was used with the eye passing through the eye in another line (possibly the sea painter)--does anyone know the details on this?
__________________
SV Sea Monkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 21:29   #20
Registered User
 
SV Sea Monkey's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Annapolis, MD
Boat: Island Packet 35
Posts: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by estarzinger View Post
have never done a slip knot on the piling. I usually take the line around the piling and back (both ends) to a cleat on Hawk. But I can see I lip knot might be useful in some specific situations - like when the piling is so rough the line will not run at all smoothly around it.
When I double a line back to the boat, I have a knack for getting the line jammed between the piling and the deck boards of the dock. I like being able to keep the hitch elevated above these pinch points, plus the whole line comes aboard very quickly--no trailing lines in the water, even for just a few seconds. Of course, this is just for a few minutes while leaving the dock--the hitch is not secure enough to leave unattended.
__________________

__________________
SV Sea Monkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
knot

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:09.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.