Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

View Poll Results: How often do you practice MOB procedures?
Every time we get underway 2 1.74%
On a set schedule, ie Monthly/Weekly/Annualy 8 6.96%
At the start of each passage 7 6.09%
Any time a new crewmember is aboard 9 7.83%
Not as often as we should 62 53.91%
Never 27 23.48%
Voters: 115. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 20-03-2008, 10:43   #91
Registered User
 
hallie's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: oregon coast
Boat: Matsu, Columbia 34
Posts: 32
Send a message via Skype™ to hallie
hahahah! i love the onion.

hey - anyone remember who linked to all the coast guard accounts of MOB situations? i was reading through it in december, i think, and i can't remember where i found it. geordie doesn't believe me that he's better off in his wardrobe than i am in mine (he has a locker full of wool sweaters) and i simply refuse to give up this tack of mine in the argument. (have you ever seen a sheep freeze to death?? me neither.)
__________________

__________________
Geordie's first mate (ha!) on Matsu, the mighty Columbia 34

when people lost sight of the way to live came codes of love and honesty
~Lao Tsu

life is dangerous and always ends in death.
hallie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-03-2008, 12:07   #92
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,508
Images: 123
I love it when these old threads pop up. When my ex, and I started sailing. We were on S.F.Bay on a usual windy afternoon. I stepped to the stern, a whole 3 feet, and dropped the MOB pole over, SPLASH. She looked at me, and I looked at the MOB. She says " WHat the hell did you do that for?" I just fell over save me.....LOLOLOLOL, Lots of cursing at me, and 45 minutes later we had one frozen MOB on board.

I use to practice gybing on windy days sailing alone for hours on end. It is my chosen move to get back to a victim as quick as possible. I think the figure 8 gives you a better chance to lose sight of the victim, and the timing is longer.
__________________

__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-03-2008, 21:05   #93
Registered User
 
Gene :^)'s Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Boat: 1914 Fantail M.Y. "Strathbelle"
Posts: 222
If I fell over and it was life threatening, I wouldn't care how you saved me. Even if you could only lassoo my arm or a leg and hoist me upside down or sideways, it might hurt like hell and even cause injury but at least I live to tell the story.

People worry about a "proper and comfortable" harness but if I can't just climb up a ladder then by all means, save me any way you can.

Break some bones, pull some muscles, or beat me up... Just save me!!!

Great idea posted earlier about making your own dummy with clothing and water filled 2 liter bottles. I am thinking of sewing a heavy denim long sleeve shirt into a pair of denim overalls. Fill the legs with 2 liter bottles, the arms with small to medium bottled water bottles and the body with the large rectangular 2 gallon water bottles. Use a ball buoy for a head. All that water should weigh nearly what a person does and with a life jacket may float just like one.
__________________
Gene :^)

1914 Fantail Motor Yacht of Riveted Iron & Steel
http://www.Strathbelle.com
Gene :^) is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-03-2008, 05:28   #94
Registered User
 
Eleven's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Southampton UK
Boat: Jaguar 22 mono called Arfur.
Posts: 1,220
Images: 3
AS a true newbie it's fascinating reading.
My initial approach will be a lifebouy on a long rope (sheet?) with a small drag device, knotty bundle whatever.
Circle the MOB at a distance to ensnare in rope. If it's concious it'll sort the rope out, if it ain't you can pull it closer. Dnagerous bit is getting near the boat.
A slightly inflated dinghy will allow the moving MOB to get into a more secure (and warmer) position. How do you keep your dinghy when cruising?
Now a harness can be properly fitted, tried and finally a heaving line thrown and attached to a winch. Running the line through the cleats near mid point should be enough to gain the deck unaided while the boat is sorted. Spare halyard will fit the winch. Where is it kept?
ALSO I'm much more keen on getting the wife competent in all aspects of live aboard cruising/sailing. If I'm ill I'll rely on her, if I fall off I want her to live. She won't need sextant skills and advanced nav. If the sat nav packs up she can PanPan or Mayday.
It's standing orders that (aero style) all diversion routes, safe ports and bays, are planned and entry details in the ready file as well as the planned plan.
And if you take out landlubbers they need to know too, even on an afternoons sail.
When I retire off the boat the back door is a tempting option.
How have senior cruisers considered their life after cruising?
It's a plan. Does it work? What's yours? HELP A NEWBIE. No, please don't throw me in.
__________________
Ex Prout 31 Sailor, Now it's a 22ft Jaguar called 'Arfur' here in sunny Southampton, UK.
A few places left in Quayside Marina and Kemps Marina.
Eleven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2008, 19:15   #95
Senior Cruiser
 
44'cruisingcat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,450
Images: 69
One of these: Lifesling MOB Recovery System Is much more effective than a lifebouy.

MOB rescue is one very good argument in favour of Harryproas. The ability to just stop and sail the boat back up its own wake would surely help.
__________________
44'cruisingcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2008, 22:21   #96
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Not enough is my answer. When I am with my marine technician, I don't worry about it. He has enough power boat experience to get back to me should I fall over. When I am not with my marine tech, I tell at least one passenger, usually the chief scientist, how to put the boat in neutral and how to use the radio. Being the chief scientist, they already know where to find the boats position on any of the GPS repeaters. I tell him or her the Coast Guard monitors Ch 16 and all you have to do is depress the key on the mike and speak clearly. Thats about the best that can be done. I cant expect a scientist to learn how to maneuver a boat each and every time I leave the dock without my marine tech onboard. I spend about 98% of the cruise inside the cabin so the chances of me going over are very slim. I do require that everyone on deck wear a PFD...no exceptions.

I really like the hat overboard rule mentioned by someone earlier.. Thats a great idea to make a MOB drill spontaneous and realistic.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 09:24   #97
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,508
Images: 123
HAT OVERBOARD DRILL? There are number of fish sporting a few of my favorite caps in S.F. Bay. Finally I discovered the clip on attatchments. I never did save a cap.....THEY SANK TOO QUICK, or maybe I was too SLOW?
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 09:34   #98
Registered User
 
Connemara's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Boat: Mirage 27 in Toronto; Wright 10 in Auckland
Posts: 671
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagine2frolic View Post
HAT OVERBOARD DRILL? There are number of fish sporting a few of my favorite caps in S.F. Bay. Finally I discovered the clip on attatchments. I never did save a cap.....THEY SANK TOO QUICK, or maybe I was too SLOW?

Well, and it was probably windy. I never lose a cap on a calm day.

Connemara
__________________
Connemara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 13:03   #99
֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 13,022
Last time we did a hat overboard drill (after all, it is a MARPOL violation to let the hat go overboard without retrieving it!) a helpful boat coming on a reciprocal course said "We'll get it" and promptly OVERRAN IT.

Damned glad it wasn't live crew they were trying to help with.
__________________
hellosailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-04-2008, 15:18   #100
Sponsoring Vendor
 
Tellie's Avatar

Community Sponsor

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Hollywood, Fl.
Boat: FP Athena 38' Poerava
Posts: 3,043
Anyone do their MOB drills a night in a rough sea? It's amazing how fast you lose sight of a MOB during a rough sea in the day time, at night it's a new ball game. Just for an experiment I threw an old life jacket overboard with a cheap strobe attached to it, closed my eyes then counted to 20. It took me a few moments to spot the strobe. These are my rules at night. 1) Everyone in the cockpit has a life jacket on period. 2) Anyone on deck has a harness and is attached. 3) All jackets have strobes and whistles. 4) First one to see a man overboard breaks the glow stick and throws the MOB pole, MOB if capable swims and sticks with MOB pole, Yeah ya gotta tell them that. 5) Helmsmsn hits MOB on GPS 6) Spotter keeps an eye and a finger pointing at MOB shouting position of MOB. 7) Things that float start going overboard there's nothing I can't replace. I made a dozen sticks with weights and floats, like little dive flag poles, I keep in a 2' by 4" PVC pipe with glow sticks attached. They go over every five seconds. These make a great visable trail. It's important to keep these weighted so they are more likely to move like the MOB. Just tossing them in won't work they will scatter too fast. 8) If the engine is running, release all sails. Otherwise sail back. I will still start the engines while sailing back. But I don't rely on the engines if they haven't been running, cold deisels are not reliable in this situation. You have to decide your preferred method of tracking back but yeah we train until it's second nature. Then a couple of times a month we verbally refresh. Usally when I see boredom on board a life jacket accidental like goes in the drink and it's instant MOB training time. I can wait to dock to practice docking skills and I can wait till we anchor to practice anchoring. But I never wait to practice MOB drills. On this particular issue I AM Captain Bligh, all will obey.
Tellie is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 21-04-2008, 19:43   #101
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tellie View Post
Anyone do their MOB drills a night in a rough sea? It's amazing how fast you lose sight of a MOB during a rough sea in the day time, at night it's a new ball game. Just for an experiment I threw an old life jacket overboard with a cheap strobe attached to it, closed my eyes then counted to 20. It took me a few moments to spot the strobe. These are my rules at night. 1) Everyone in the cockpit has a life jacket on period. 2) Anyone on deck has a harness and is attached. 3) All jackets have strobes and whistles. 4) First one to see a man overboard breaks the glow stick and throws the MOB pole, MOB if capable swims and sticks with MOB pole, Yeah ya gotta tell them that. 5) Helmsmsn hits MOB on GPS 6) Spotter keeps an eye and a finger pointing at MOB shouting position of MOB. 7) Things that float start going overboard there's nothing I can't replace. I made a dozen sticks with weights and floats, like little dive flag poles, I keep in a 2' by 4" PVC pipe with glow sticks attached. They go over every five seconds. These make a great visable trail. It's important to keep these weighted so they are more likely to move like the MOB. Just tossing them in won't work they will scatter too fast. 8) If the engine is running, release all sails. Otherwise sail back. I will still start the engines while sailing back. But I don't rely on the engines if they haven't been running, cold deisels are not reliable in this situation. You have to decide your preferred method of tracking back but yeah we train until it's second nature. Then a couple of times a month we verbally refresh. Usally when I see boredom on board a life jacket accidental like goes in the drink and it's instant MOB training time. I can wait to dock to practice docking skills and I can wait till we anchor to practice anchoring. But I never wait to practice MOB drills. On this particular issue I AM Captain Bligh, all will obey.
Tellie....I like your style.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-04-2008, 19:44   #102
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tellie View Post
Anyone do their MOB drills a night in a rough sea? It's amazing how fast you lose sight of a MOB during a rough sea in the day time, at night it's a new ball game. Just for an experiment I threw an old life jacket overboard with a cheap strobe attached to it, closed my eyes then counted to 20. It took me a few moments to spot the strobe. These are my rules at night. 1) Everyone in the cockpit has a life jacket on period. 2) Anyone on deck has a harness and is attached. 3) All jackets have strobes and whistles. 4) First one to see a man overboard breaks the glow stick and throws the MOB pole, MOB if capable swims and sticks with MOB pole, Yeah ya gotta tell them that. 5) Helmsmsn hits MOB on GPS 6) Spotter keeps an eye and a finger pointing at MOB shouting position of MOB. 7) Things that float start going overboard there's nothing I can't replace. I made a dozen sticks with weights and floats, like little dive flag poles, I keep in a 2' by 4" PVC pipe with glow sticks attached. They go over every five seconds. These make a great visable trail. It's important to keep these weighted so they are more likely to move like the MOB. Just tossing them in won't work they will scatter too fast. 8) If the engine is running, release all sails. Otherwise sail back. I will still start the engines while sailing back. But I don't rely on the engines if they haven't been running, cold deisels are not reliable in this situation. You have to decide your preferred method of tracking back but yeah we train until it's second nature. Then a couple of times a month we verbally refresh. Usally when I see boredom on board a life jacket accidental like goes in the drink and it's instant MOB training time. I can wait to dock to practice docking skills and I can wait till we anchor to practice anchoring. But I never wait to practice MOB drills. On this particular issue I AM Captain Bligh, all will obey.
Tellie....I like your style. There is nothing wrong with what might seem like overkill to others when it comes to a MOB.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2008, 20:01   #103
Senior Cruiser
 
Therapy's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: W Florida
Boat: The Jon boat still, plus a 2007 SeaCat.
Posts: 6,894
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tellie View Post
I made a dozen sticks with weights and floats, like little dive flag poles, I keep in a 2' by 4" PVC pipe with glow sticks attached. They go over every five seconds.
I learned that (before glow siticks were a thought) a long time ago and it seems to make sense. We used (never had to) a few flashlights.
__________________
Therapy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2011, 14:48   #104
Registered User
 
Sabbatical II's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Lake Macquarie
Boat: Bluewater 420 CC
Posts: 756
Images: 1
Re: MOB Procedures

Well I've done a few sailing school courses and they have all wanted us to do the figure 8 thing. As far as I can see it takes you potentially too far from the MOB and all sailing school drills seem to presume that you only set sail with a crew of 6 or 8, 4 of whom will be on deck at any one time. Last year I chartered a Catalina 34 with 3 of us aboard and we did MOB the quick stop method. Going to windward it's amazingly effective and with practice we were even able to back down on the MOB (actually, a cabbage) with a backed headsail. A little more is involved when going with the wind, but it's definately my preference when short handed.

Greg
__________________

__________________
Sabbatical II is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
mob

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 18:11.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.