Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 14-11-2012, 06:44   #46
Registered User
 
Blue Crab's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Hurricane Highway
Boat: Cal 29
Posts: 3,883
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

I hated it but I quit reading on "watch" one clear bright pleasant afternoon when my reliable crew, Miss Autohelm, cleared her throat about 20' from the Key West sea buoy. My cedar stripped cockleshell wouldn't have won that argument.

Good morning, Zee.
__________________

__________________
Blue Crab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-11-2012, 06:51   #47
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,777
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

i only read on watch during daylight hours-and only books i can place down for a bit suddenly if needed--i troll for fishies...and watch the sea for life and changes--

good morning, blue..!!!

hope everyone is having a beautiful day!!
__________________

zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-11-2012, 07:23   #48
Moderator
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,894
Images: 1
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
Doh.

As Noelex explained in actual terms!

b.
.....but thanks to you for reminding me of this. Once explained, I recall having this info lost in the dregs of my memories.
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-11-2012, 07:45   #49
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by daddle View Post
There is no solution. Watch standing at night is almost useless. I slow the boat down and sleep. I figure sleeping is no worse than the typical cruiser "on watch" 24/7 head down in a book or iPad. I have passed several that never saw me wave.
You might want to read the finding.

FindACase | GRANHOLM v. THE VESSEL TFL EXPRESS

Quote:
In the case at bar, Granholm's decision to go below during the nighttime was negligent.His own testimony reflects an awareness that this was so. I have previously quoted the relevant portion; Granholm said that "as a rule I made it a habit to take my resting periods during daytime and when the conditions were such that I could afford having some rest." The reasons are obvious. At night a sailboat, even displaying the proper lights, is not nearly as visible as she is in the daytime, when underway under sail. Granholm was sailing near a recognized transatlantic route for large vessels. He should have adhered to his own practice and rested only during the daytime. It may seem unfeeling to condemn single handed transatlantic sailors for sleeping at night. But they pursue this hazardous avocation voluntarily, and are not exempt from the requirements of prudent seamanship.
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-11-2012, 10:57   #50
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,819
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
......
The cones (or whatever it is) responsible for night vision (low light) are off center. Thus by looking to the side of the place where the light is, you will see it, but when you look right at it, you will not.

Takes a doctor to explain in proper vocab but air pilots and many seamen know to use it.

b.
In simple terms our eyes contain two type of photoreceptive cells.
1. Cones that are located only centrally. They provide by far our best vision during well lit conditions (indoors or out).
2. Rods that are located primarily peripherally. Although they do not provide us with very detailed vision, unlike cones they still respond at very low levels of light.

So at night, vision is best off to the side of the point we are actually looking at. It does take some practice to concentrate your attention several degrees off centre, but its well worth training yourself on how to do this.

On the subject of night vision, it actually deteriorates dramatically when we have been exposed to any bright light. It takes roughly 20 minutes before it is nearly at its peak again. So avoid turning on any lights unnecessarily at night. This is also another reason why reading while on watch at night is not a good idea.

If any light is required at night, a red source is best as it will provide enough light for the cones to kick in and for you to see, but as rods are not very sensitive to red light, your best night vision will not be temporarily lost.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-11-2012, 11:39   #51
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cayuga Lake NY - or on the boat somewhere south of there
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,096
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

"No way any small cruising boat is gonna have someone at
the helm eyeball scanning and using all available devices 24/7."

Not true. If my boat is underway, someone is on watch. No, they may not be actually scanning the horizon every minute of the watch but they are awake and in the cockpit paying attention to what is going on. I am not alone in doing this. In fact, I have rarely met anyone who made a long ocean passage who felt OK sailing along with everyone on the boat asleep. Or if they did they didnt admit it. I would not sail with anyone who didnt maintain a watch 24/7.
__________________
sck5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-11-2012, 11:52   #52
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cayuga Lake NY - or on the boat somewhere south of there
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,096
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

on radar

I have it but cant keep it on continuously without killing the batteries. It gets used more often to try to figure out how far away a ship is and to figure out if it is on collision course. Of course in fog it would stay on but eyeballs are virtually always the first line of defense
__________________
sck5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-11-2012, 12:22   #53
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sck5 View Post
on radar

I have it but cant keep it on continuously without killing the batteries. It gets used more often to try to figure out how far away a ship is and to figure out if it is on collision course. Of course in fog it would stay on but eyeballs are virtually always the first line of defense
Technically, the rules require you to use the radar if you have it. I have one, an older model, and my situation is the same as yours. I find the AIS, in general, much more effective - even though not everything is on AIS, at least the big stuff all is.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-11-2012, 22:12   #54
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 2,437
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

Confessional Here! in the 70s on my first long passage(Mexico to Marquesas) after the first 2 or 3 nights, I would sleep at night for a couple of hours at a time. Sometimes the nights were so beautiful that we would stand watch just for the joy of it, but often asleep for a time. A year later from the Tuamotus to Hawaii was a similar watch standing. Never saw another vessal when out of site of land. ( Maybe just didnt see them). Two years later going from New England to Bermuda, it scared the beejessus out of me with the amount of traffic. The trip from Bermuda down to the Islands was just as busy with comercial traffic. I always kept watch from that point on. I did lots of deliveries after that and always had someone on watch, with always a third or fourth hand on long deliveries. I must take some exception to the idea that it is safer to sleep during the day than it is at night! Once away from shore lights I believe that a white sail on a white boat is much less likly to be seen in the day time than a mast head light on what is usually a very black ocean at night. (Your opinions may vary) (Oh what a surprize?)____Grant.
__________________
gjordan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 15-11-2012, 22:46   #55
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Australia
Boat: Franz Maas 37
Posts: 237
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

I think the first thing to do is to fully understand the International Rules For The Avoidance of Collision At Sea. These rules are required knowledge for anyone who leaves the shore in any boat. Then, AIS, then a watchkeeping regimen which involves all crew, 24/7.

Watchkeeping needs to be active to all horizons..the full 360. Many years ago, I was on the helm crossing the Gulf Of Carpentaria. I realised watchkeeping needed to be 360, when a mid sized Indian registered freighter snuck up on me from behind. Given that half the crew were watching over the starboard bow rail, I guess they were playing let's-frighten-the-hell-outa-the-yottie game.
__________________
Auzzee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-11-2012, 13:14   #56
Wayfaring Mariner
 
captain58sailin's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Homer, AK is my home port
Boat: Skookum 53'
Posts: 4,045
Images: 5
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

While underway off the west coast of Africa, one can encounter many unlit fishing vessels and gear, they use intermittant LED lights to warn you off, this is a great improvement from times gone by when a flickering bic lighter was your only warning that there was something near, all wood canoes and gear do not show up on the radar with any kind of reliability. And using the corner of your eye can often catch something that you won't see head on, it never hurts to swing your head in small increments to detect small objects. I read somewhere that either a blue or green light works better for night vision than red light, perhaps someone can illuminate this subject or correct me and I'll go back to looking at red LEDs for my pilot house.
__________________
" Wisdom; is your reward for surviving your mistakes"
captain58sailin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2012, 01:13   #57
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,819
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by captain58sailin View Post
......
I read somewhere that either a blue or green light works better for night vision than red light, perhaps someone can illuminate this subject or correct me and I'll go back to looking at red LEDs for my pilot house.
The cells primarily responsible for vision under very dark conditions (rods) are most sensitive to blue-green lights. They do not respond well to red. So in dark conditions using your peripheral vision a blue green light (or a white light) will be far more easily visible than a red one.

To preserve this vision, use a red light to see in the cockpit/cabin (the cones which are responsible for good central vision under brighter conditions will then be utilised). It takes 20-30 minutes for our eyes to recover their sensitivity after being exposed to even a few seconds of bright light light, but as rods don't respond much to red light, a red night light won't temporarily knock them out.

Interestingly hours of very bright exposure to sunlight will delay full recovery of night vision and the effect is cumulative. Days of exposure to bright sunlit conditions knock our night vision even further, so full time cruisers are particularly affected.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2012, 04:18   #58
Moderator
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,894
Images: 1
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaworthy Lass View Post
..................Interestingly hours of very bright exposure to sunlight will delay full recovery of night vision and the effect is cumulative. Days of exposure to bright sunlit conditions knock our night vision even further, so full time cruisers are particularly affected.
So then we can consider the "pirates", wearing a patch over a perfectly good eye, as insightful and prepared.
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2012, 04:41   #59
Senior Cruiser
 
atoll's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: gettin naughty on the beach in cornwall
Boat: 63 custom alloy sloop,macwester26,prout snowgoose 37 elite catamaran!
Posts: 9,312
Images: 75
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

i once went along as crew between cyprus and lebanon on a 50ft sweden yacht,where the owner considered sitting downstairs with a bottle of whisky watching the radar,adequete watch keeping!
__________________
my catamaran building project updates http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...36#post2502136
atoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2012, 08:18   #60
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,819
Re: Lookout - What Do You Do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptForce View Post
So then we can consider the "pirates", wearing a patch over a perfectly good eye, as insightful and prepared.
Not entirely silly! I shut one eye at night to preserve night vision when I need to turn a light on. Only problem is that you lose depth perception then, so doesn't work if you need to do any tasks requiring this.
__________________

__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 20:21.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.