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Old 23-05-2013, 17:26   #31
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

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No you can not shut it down with a rag, I tried. You need to go around and manually shut it down at the solinoid. Good lesson for people here , I really tried to kill that engine with a rag and it would not stop.
I was next door for a while and the met the owner, nice guy. He started the engine but it would not stop, so I helped.
Solenoid ? Every diesel has a manual kill switch on the fuel inlet side. It's usually beside or below the 2 micron fuel filter.
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Old 23-05-2013, 17:47   #32
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

Also, the solar panels are fine, the dumbass electrician (me) had the meter on AC. I found three solar vents on the boat that were all bad though. I'm not sure I want to replace them at $175 each if they don't last...
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Old 23-05-2013, 18:38   #33
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

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I'm not sure I want to replace them at $175 each if they don't last...
They don't last.
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Old 25-05-2013, 22:11   #34
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

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Solenoid ? Every diesel has a manual kill switch on the fuel inlet side. It's usually beside or below the 2 micron fuel filter.
Where on earth did you come up with that idea? You must be in La La land somewhere or perhaps you know about a particular model that has such a "kill switch". What is a kill switch anyway? I imagine a switch to be something electrical, like to shut off a solinoid, which is what I was talking about, this boat does not have a working switch to shut down the solinoid. As for a manual fuel valve on the engine, it did not have one nor does any old engine I have looked at. So where did you see such a thing? I want to know so if some guy starts his engine and does not know how to turn it off I can help him too.
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Old 26-05-2013, 13:42   #35
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

Guy, a "solenoid" is a device that provides a mechanical movement when energized. It can not, of itself, affect fuel flow or otherwise stop a diesel engine.

On the few engines that I am familiar with the shut off switch on the panel briefly energizes a solenoid that is connected to a fuel shut off valve. When you release the switch, the solenoid returns to its unenergized position, opening the valve back up.

On these engines (which I believe are typical) one can manually push the fuel valve lever to the off position, and the fuel is shut off exactly as if the solenoid had been energized. You can find the solenoid and valve by having someone push the stop button while you examine the engine, usually in teh region of the injector pump. You will see something move... that's where you can manually shut it off.

Not rocket science, not even close.

Cheers,

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Old 26-05-2013, 14:14   #36
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

I must be a terrible writer. What I said first was, I had to shut down the boats engine at the solinoid because the switch was not hooked up. Then somebody comes along and says, "what solinoid? Diesel engines don't have solinoids. A little frustrating.
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Old 28-05-2013, 17:48   #37
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

I am sitting in the cockpit of my boat on the hard at Green Cove Springs Marina. This is my last night here until December. I'm off to Afghanistan in the morning. It's been a good trip. We both love the boat, and I salute Gene the builder. I may never know the whole story of the boat but if I had visited the boat in person, I would have paid more for it than I did.
There is plenty of work to do on the boat but it appears to be a strong boat that was fundamentally well built, perhaps overbuilt. The hull and the cabin top seem to be 11/2 inches thick. All of the hatches are very strong and in decent condition. The paint on the masts and booms is chipping off in places and is chalky. The paint on the hull and topsides seems like an older well painted Awlgrip jobs that has a few years left at least. As I look around over the "field of dreams" here in the work yard, I am content and happy with my choice.
Now, if I could only fast forward the next five months...
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Old 28-05-2013, 18:36   #38
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

Good one, Dog! I hope that your deployment is uneventful, perhaps even boring, and that you return to your new mistress intact and ready to sail.

Good luck, mate

Jim
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Old 28-05-2013, 18:57   #39
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

Icedog, sounds like you got a lot done on this visit. I like that your going with LiFePO4 cells for your housebank. Just remember they have a high charge acceptance and can test your alternator. I also bought from Balqon.
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Old 28-05-2013, 19:37   #40
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

Hi Icedog, you will find that time flies over there. I was in Afgan for 2 years, 12 on/off and no breaks except when they let us go on vacation every 6 months... I was out of Bagram but had sites all over the place. I retired 2+ years ago or would be over there still... Keep safe there and enjoy your time, for your boat awaits you and yours...
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Old 31-05-2013, 21:34   #41
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

I'm back at FOB Shank...IDF capital of Afghanistan. Thanks for the good wishes Jim.


DeckOfficer, I see that Balqon is out of the smaller sizes in the clearance section and I am thinking about having 4 700AH cells sent to a friend in St Augustine while they are still available. I wonder if it make sense to do that or to just wait until November to order at the going rate? Who knows, the price might fall or rise...
Alan I know what you mean though time passes slowly for me here. I work for the C-RAM program and travel constantly also. I have spent the last five years working in Iraq and Afghanistan and feel a little burnt out . I spent 4 seasons in Antarctica (three winters) prior to that in the previous 5 years so I haven't been home much in the last ten years really. This is my last deployment to Afghanistan for sure!

I will be sorting through the photos I took and will post some on my blog when I get a chance though I have to hit the ground here running and may not have time this week.
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Old 01-06-2013, 06:12   #42
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

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I must be a terrible writer. What I said first was, I had to shut down the boats engine at the solinoid because the switch was not hooked up. Then somebody comes along and says, "what solinoid? Diesel engines don't have solinoids. A little frustrating.
If you are going to quote me how's about doing it correctly ? On a one line comment that should not be too hard.

I repeat EVERY diesel has a kill switch on the upper half of the motor a little below and forward or aft of the 2 micron filter. Push it back or forward and the engine will stop. To be precise it is on the side of the injector pump.

There is no need to mess about with the solinoid (sic). For starters they are always hidden so their location will not be immediately obvious. On the other hand the kill switch is always visible.
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Old 10-07-2013, 01:23   #43
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

I have some new photos of the boat on my blog in the galleries "May2013" and "Issues"
I will open new threads for the main issues like the cracks in the skeg and the cracks in the fiberglass covering the Sampson posts.
I am over a quarter of the way through my deployment and looking forward to getting back to work on the boat in December!
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Old 10-07-2013, 05:25   #44
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

You mentioned earlier in the thread being in Afganistan on "Contract" so you're a PMC or support scontractee rather than a soldier? I've chatted online with a number of army types and while in China met an ex-marine who was in the 'Stan, but what's it like for a civvie there? Must be a bit hard for a boatie surrounded by all that sand and rock
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Old 10-07-2013, 07:25   #45
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Re: Learning on a 56 foot sailboat

Kiwi303,
Yes I am a contractor. I work as a kind of Field Service Representative for my system and travel constantly from base to base. My job is different from the vast majority of civilian jobs over here. Most just come to one base and stay there for their contract length. I travel and live in transient tents and housing and I have to work independently and with the local command group. It can be exciting but is rarely fun. I also get to go to all the worst FOBs (bases) since that is where our services are needed most. The worst part of working over here is not danger but the constant work/travel schedule and the food, housing and latrines we have to live with. It is the mundane aspects of life that get so old after a while. Seeing my family only twice a year also gets very old...
I have also worked 4 contracts with the US Antarctic Program including two winters at the South Pole. Now that was fun! I loved spending time in New Zealand and "The Bog" Irish bar in Christchurch after my contracts ended...
Regards,
Kevin
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