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Old 09-08-2007, 16:29   #1
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Jib Downhaul & Stowage ?

Kind of an odd question, but if you don't have roller furling, sometimes it is handy to have a jib downhaul rigged back to the cockpit so you can bring down the jib hard and fast when solo.

And it works very well, but leaves you with a jib loose on the foredeck, or at best, blowing around between netted lifelines.

Has anyone ever used, or seen, a system that would go beyond a downhaul, to somehow "restrain" a jib on the foredeck, just by pulling in a downhaul and then...?? Somehow further "reefing" the jib down tight to the deck?

(No, I don't NEED to do this, I'm just thinking aloud about alternatives, because roller reefing isn't quite universal, yet.<G>)
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Old 09-08-2007, 16:42   #2
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Aloha Hello,
That's a good question and idea. I've thought of having Sunbrella or other fabric tube that you might sheet in the majority of of the jib but it seems you still have to go to the foredeck to stuff the leftovers.
I smell a patent here!!
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Old 09-08-2007, 20:46   #3
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John-
"Open the pod bay doors, HAL." ?
< G >

Anything more complicated than some line and blocks, would probably be more complicated than I'd want to think about.
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Old 09-08-2007, 20:47   #4
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Quote:
because roller reefing isn't quite universal, yet.
After 35 yrears I think it's been ready for prime time a lot of years. Why not have a first mate that you can order to the foredeck.
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Old 09-08-2007, 22:27   #5
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Hello,

Since 1986 I have been using a pair of double tube jib bags to ease foredeck jib handling. Each bag has two tubes located one above the other with full length zippers and internal sail stops. The bags have flaps that go over the lower lifeline, around the nearest pulpit tube, and the first stanchion. This allows up to four headsails to be securely carried on the foredeck when not in use. When light winds are expected I load the bags with a 150% genoa on each side for running downwind, a 135% genoa, and the working jib. If heaver weather is anticipated I would stuff them with the spitfire jib, storm jib, working jib, and the 135% genoa. I only use a single pair of sheets for all the headsails. After dropping a sail I stuff the foot of the sail into its tube and secure it with the sail stops. Next I unhank the sail folding the luff over the foreware sail stop and stuffing it into the tube. Then I untie the sheets and fold the leech over the aft sail stop and zipper up the tube.
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Old 09-08-2007, 22:52   #6
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People look at me weird when I say this, but I'll probably ditch my furler for a hanked on yankee. I like them more for a variety of reasons (flexibility, simplicity, less "stuff", etc).

My old hanked on jib on a previous boat had a downhaul which was very handy. Invariably it would get a little in the drink, but if you kept the clew taught on your jib lines, the tension from tack to clew would be sufficient to keep it from going into the drink entirely.

If you time it just right, you can downhaul in the irons (just pinch a bit) and it comes down on deck nicely. I kept some bungee cords up on the life lines and would tackle the cloth, securing it with those until I could properly fold / roll it and jam it down the forward hatch.
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Old 10-08-2007, 13:51   #7
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Paul, I hear you, but my question is aimed at SOLO and NO ROLLER conditions. That will happen sometimes, even if you have one crew who might be disabled or otherwise engaged.

I've done stowage with bingees, like Rebel Heart, but I'm just trying to see if there's a fast simple way to secure a headsail, once it is down, WITHOUT having to send anyone forward. Or abandon the wheel and go forward.

The same way you might prepare for a shorthanded mooring pickup in foul wx by leading a line aft, so you can work from the helm.

So far the closest thing to an idea, is to take the downhaul (strong but thin line, and perhaps run it to a turning block/ring set about halfway between the forestay and mast, so that when it pulls the head down, it also forms a line coming halfway back on the sail, partly containing it to the deck. (With the help of one jibsheet holding the clew back further on that side.)

Yeah, I do appreciate roller furling, even if it can't compete with riding the bow and doing hank-on sail changes for fun in wet weather.<G>
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Old 10-08-2007, 14:47   #8
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Aloha Hello,

"So far the closest thing to an idea, is to take the downhaul (strong but thin line, and perhaps run it to a turning block/ring set about halfway between the forestay and mast, so that when it pulls the head down, it also forms a line coming halfway back on the sail, partly containing it to the deck. (With the help of one jibsheet holding the clew back further on that side.)"

Would this be kind of like a lazy jack system that you see on some boats for the mainsail? I guess you could rig a jib boom with lazy jacks? How about a boomless lazy jack system? Don't mind me I'm just repeating what the voices in my head are suggesting. : )

Regards,

JohnL
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Old 10-08-2007, 14:49   #9
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Viking Sailor,

Your system sounds interesting. Do you have a photo. I'm a visual kind of guy and just can't picture it.

Kind Regards,

JohnL
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Old 10-08-2007, 15:22   #10
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Johnl, you know, in a way it would. A very pale imitation of a lazy jack stowing the sail on half the foredeck instead of neatly on the boom.<G>

Not so much stowing...but at least, keeping it from flogging all the hell over the place.
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Old 10-08-2007, 16:57   #11
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Great read so far!

I'm in the process of re-rigging the downhaul on my Pearson Triton. I'm torn between running it around the stantions or straight across the deck and up the cabin top like the previous owner had it. (no line in place when I bought it, but the cam cleats are marked.)

What diameter line would be suggested, I assume a snap shackle is ideal for connecting it to the head.
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Old 10-08-2007, 17:15   #12
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Zach, the few times I've used a downhaul I ran it straight down the forestay to a spare block (used for a job cunningham) so it would pull "straight" down the forestay. Since you are usually fighting friction more than real wind load, I'd suggest a light strong line, whatever is still thick enough for you to conveniently pull the few times you will need it. (Unlike sheets and halyards that you want to put some muscle on, regularly, without tearing up your hands.)

Snap shackle certainly would work.
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Old 10-08-2007, 21:18   #13
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I have used a bungee type cargo net like used to secure loads in pickup trucks. If it is attached to the lifeline stanchion bases on one side it deploys in seconds and holds the jib down on the deck till you can give it proper attention. I'll grant you it's primitive, but it works. Jesse
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Old 19-08-2012, 21:35   #14
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Re: Jib downhaul & stowage?

I was looking around for general info on rigging a jib downhaul and found your post. Later in the evening I found another post which may answer your question. This is what I found:

"I recently learned a new trick that some may be interested in. It requires more line (depending on the headsail you use), but it works well for me. I attach 2 snap hooks to the forestay when I hank on the jib. I put them between the forth and fifth hank from the bottom. Then when I run the jib downhaul line, I go up from the block at the tack of the jib and through one of the snap hooks, aft to the clew of the jib, around the aft end of the jib THROUGH the hole at the clew, back forward through the other snap hook (on the other side of the jib), then up to the head of the jib. (This may sound complicated, but it really isn't.) When you are ready to lower the jib, release the jib halyard and pull in on the doownhaul. Not only is it pulled down but the clew will be pulled and held forward as well, resulting in a nice, neat "ball" of jib on the bow inside the bow pulpit (if equipped). The obvious advantage is there is not way the sail can fall off of the bow and into the water. It works well for me."

If you want to follow-up for more information, I found the above quote here:
Catalina Direct Clubhouse Forums

Seems like a good idea to me.

Tom Rishel
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Old 20-08-2012, 18:55   #15
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Re: Jib downhaul & stowage?

Google "Gerr downhaul".
Requires some fiddling when setting up but it works.
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