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Old 16-11-2012, 09:17   #16
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

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Originally Posted by pete33458 View Post
Seems like just the fine line between close hauled and stalling to me.
Try it on your boat--you'll be able to feel the difference.
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Old 16-11-2012, 09:17   #17
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

Not only will every boat heave to differently, but wind conditions and sea state will also effect the technique. I've practiced heaving to under mild conditions (20-25 knot winds), but always have used the full set of sails thinking that under more severe conditions I would be reefed down and the full sails could tell me something about the behavior under more extreme conditions. I have a modified full keel with the cutaway forefoot and the boat stays pretty much broadside to the wind whereas I want to be about 45 degrees off. Removing the backwinded yankee would probably let the boat approach that 45 degree angle assuming that it does not tack thur. There has been only one time when I needed to heave to under extreme conditons and that was when the boat was hit with a 50 knot gust that lasted for at least 10 minutes. I was close hauled under full sail in about 20 knots of wind when the gust hit and the next thing was that the starboard side was well under water. The weather helm pushed the boat up into the wind and I tacked through it and then locked the rudder into the heave to position to allow me to go forward to reduce sail. By the time I got the first reef in the wind had moderated and I could continue sailing. I was in protected water and waves were not a concern. Not sure how big waves would have been handled nor am I sure that if I was on a run under severe conditons that I would want to turn back into it and heave to.
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Old 16-11-2012, 09:23   #18
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

I found that the Jeanneau 43DS I had wouldn't heave-to well at all, despite playing around with sail settings.

The Jeanneau 49DS would heave-to with a bit of furling of the genoa and would sit like an island in heavy seas.

The Jeanneau 57 will heave to readily in all sail settings, but in order to not rip the radar arch off the main the 150% genoa should be furled in quite a ways. Once hove-to the boat becomes very stable indeed.

All 3 are fin-keeled boats.
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Old 16-11-2012, 09:29   #19
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

I heave-to when pulling crab traps.

Steve
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Old 16-11-2012, 09:43   #20
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

In a small boat, you can heave-to to take some rest or to fix something but it is a poor storm survival tactic - a bad wave will roll the small boat or wipe it out.

It is the seas, not the wind that dictate how to handle your boat. Heaving-to, in heavy blow, is fun, in bad seas it is an accident waiting to happen.

I believe the bigger the boat the longer she can remain hove-to. It takes a bigger wave to knock down the bigger boat. It is just my guess as I was never forced to heave to in a big boat, in a storm.

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Old 16-11-2012, 09:43   #21
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

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Originally Posted by lancelot9898 View Post
Not only will every boat heave to differently, but wind conditions and sea state will also effect the technique.
Sea conditions are indeed important, especially for smaller boats.

Years ago I sailed on Olson 30, which is an ULDB racer, and it was so light that it couldn't hold hove-to for long in steep chop.

That said, a lot of fin-keelers on modern production boats incorrectly claim their boats won't heave to. A buddy of mine in a Catalina 42 swore that his boat would not heave to, but I went out with him and showed him how to do it.

Let's put it this way: even though the boat wouldn't heave to for its owner, it would heave to for me.
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Old 16-11-2012, 09:49   #22
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

We heave to for all of the above... I find it's really nice to heave to when lowering the main in high winds, especially when single handing. It's also nice and easy for any kind of a break. I usually roll the 135 to about 90 so it doesn't rub on the stays, sheet in the main/genoa as I put the tiller over, let the genoa backwind and put the tiller to leeward and we're done. A little adjustment of the main sheet to set the angle to the wind..
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Old 16-11-2012, 10:20   #23
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

Without a full keel (with the forefoot), I think trying to heave to in big seas is useless. That's been my experience in long-fin-and-skeg and cutaway "full keels" anyway. Sure in semi flat water... no problem. But otherwise, the force of the sea overpowers the force of the wind. Throwing the bow down. Tried once in my Passport 47 for about 3 hours to heave to, eventually even going down to double reefed main only... boat still wouldnt stay up enough for comfort. As soon as the bow started to make way heading up some, the seas would knock it down, to "beam on the seas" and rolling with green water over the center hatch. Once we started sailing down wind we got some rest!
If you read the Pardees thoughts about using a bridle etc... it becomes pretty clear, reading between the lines, that simple heaving to in a heavy sea state is a problem for even them....
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Old 16-11-2012, 10:27   #24
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

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(...) If you read the Pardees thoughts about using a bridle etc... it becomes pretty clear, reading between the lines, that simple heaving to in a heavy sea state is a problem for even them....
Yes. And once there is a parachute and the bridle there, one is no longer hove-to, I think.

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Old 16-11-2012, 10:47   #25
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

Cheechako, I suspect you are right about the behavior of my boat in big seas from my limited experience in less severe conditions. A friend in an IP35 was able to forereach under trisail alone under gail force conditions for several days, however he had 3 other crew members aboard and always had someone at the helm. I always think that the weakest link on any sail is the human aboard and for that reason I want to have the ability to take passive action rather than to actively sail the vessel. Plus I singlehand a lot and I don't have the endurance to actively sail much longer than 30 hours. Lying ahull is not a good approach so not sure if any passive approach is good.
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Old 16-11-2012, 10:52   #26
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

Our Hunter 450 would heave-to very easily, so does our Oyster 53. Have used it frequently while making adjustments since everything becomes very calm. Even heave-to while sailing alone just to use the head.
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Old 16-11-2012, 11:42   #27
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

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Originally Posted by lancelot9898 View Post
Cheechako, I suspect you are right about the behavior of my boat in big seas from my limited experience in less severe conditions. A friend in an IP35 was able to forereach under trisail alone under gail force conditions for several days, however he had 3 other crew members aboard and always had someone at the helm. I always think that the weakest link on any sail is the human aboard and for that reason I want to have the ability to take passive action rather than to actively sail the vessel. Plus I singlehand a lot and I don't have the endurance to actively sail much longer than 30 hours. Lying ahull is not a good approach so not sure if any passive approach is good.
Yeah, the above mentioned situation in the Passport felt more like lying ahull than hove to! it's so simple in moderate weather... but water packs a lot more force than wind...
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Old 16-11-2012, 11:44   #28
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I heave-to all the time.

Often I will sail out of the jetty into the gulf just under my headsail, then heave-to and raise the mail. Same when coming back in. I'll sail up a few 100 meters of the jetty entrance, heave-to and drop the mail.
When I'm out sailing I will heave-to when I put a reef in the mainsail.
When the wife and kids need a break or I want to stop and boil a pot of hot water for soup or tea.
Evening before last I sat hove-to for nearly an hour while I was on the phone talking with my boss.
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Old 16-11-2012, 17:33   #29
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

I've sailed many different boats and the only one I could not make heave to was a Wharram 23 catamaran. I haven't sailed that many cats so can't tell you about others.
Wind and sea conditions determine the ease in which its done. Fin keelers require a bit of sail adjustment, especially slacking the main a bit.
kind regards,
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Old 17-11-2012, 07:21   #30
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Re: Heaving-To, Do you do it?

I use heave to almost every day that I go sailing. The boat heaves to pretty well under mizzen only although I have to be careful that it doesn't tack when the winds are light and the seas are large.

We have a mooring up a narrow creek so we don't like to sail up there with the main up. We just roll up the jib and set or douse the main and it is quite comfortable. Also, if I am singlehanding and it is rough enough that the boat won't balance (no autopilot or windvane but the boat can be balanced most of the time), then I heave to to grab meals or use the head.
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