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Old 09-06-2011, 18:13   #1
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Going Engineless

I am just about to go pick up a little pram dinghy for my Bristol 24 and was wondering if anyone has any suggestions or experience using a rowing dinghy to tow their boat in/out of the protected area of the harbor. I'm just wondering if I'll be more embarassed by trying tack after tack in a long keel boat and going nowhere, or by trying to row a 6,000 pound sloop from an 8' dinghy and still going nowhere. Any help would be great!
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Old 09-06-2011, 18:18   #2
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Re: Going engineless

How about a pair of skulling oars on your Bristol? Capt Phil
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Old 09-06-2011, 18:20   #3
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Re: Going engineless

You would be netter off rowing your Bristol. Tou would have bettter control that way..
Pardey's rowed there 28' like that always...
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Old 09-06-2011, 18:37   #4
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Re: Going engineless

How would I go about getting/ making the considerably longer than normal oars required for rowing my Bristol. It has an 8' beam. I know it can be done, I just wonder if I should build my own.
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Old 09-06-2011, 18:55   #5
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Re: Going engineless

Start with a couple of pieces of straight grain 2X10's, draw the outline of the oars and cut them to the length that is comfortable for you handle from your rowing station in a standing position. If you are skulling, ie, facing forward and pushing the oars, allow for a complete bite of the blade and about a 3" cross at the handle end as you return stroke.
If you going to row, ie, facing aft, the measurement will be a little longer on the return stroke. Length of the oar will depend on trial and error and where you are sitting or standing, how tall you are.
As an alternative, check out a local rowing club and see if they have any old or damaged oars available that could be repaired or refurbished. Maybe you could borrow a couple to get and idea of the length you might need to fabricate your own... Capt Phil
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Old 09-06-2011, 19:16   #6
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Re: Going engineless

Did Lin and Larry Pardy have 2 oars? Or just one? I thought it was one. A scull, aft. Same as Slocumb.

This picture is off the Pardeys website, but not of their boat

Sailing with Lin & Larry Pardey

Found it! Here is one of Lin http://i880.photobucket.com/albums/a...y-sculling.jpg
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Old 09-06-2011, 19:23   #7
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I was also under the impression that they used one oar and I've been curious as to how effective it would be in my 33'. It seems like a good idea to have some sort or back up.
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Old 09-06-2011, 19:24   #8
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Re: Going engineless

if there is wind you can sail (tack) out as long as there is not a strong current to fight, if there is no wind and there is a current, just sit tight, nothing you can do but chill, if there is no wind and no current you could get the bristol moving either by rowing it or towing it with the dinghy, dont discount making a single yuloh to scull off the stern, that is the perfect size boat to cruise engineless
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Old 09-06-2011, 19:29   #9
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Re: Going engineless

...or you could take the dinghy, put a kedge anchor on and run it out to the end of your rode and kedge your way out by using the windless. Repeat until you have room to maneuver and you can set sail and get underway.
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Old 09-06-2011, 19:43   #10
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Re: Going engineless

Rowing Dinghy is fine if there's no wind or current.Very efficient.Three masters were often towed in calms.
If you are going into docks singlehanded...that's where it gets sticky.Lots of bumpers on the tow-even lifejackets and rolled blankets along the sheer will save grief.Lots of tie-up lines hanging on the lifelines-both sides if you can.Two lines to the tiller of the towjust in reach on the lazarette across the lifelines might avert a final disaster....
Better yet,get help .Anybody that doesn't argue and is familiarised with what's supposed to happen will do.

In the dinghy,paddle ansynchronically (sp?yikes) for smoother power.Don't pull "all-together".Slow down well in advance.Once accelerated,the tow will carry way a long time!

Think "tugboat" and don't let the floating! towline ahead of the dinghy's quarters or allow the tow to overtake without being able to quickly let loose....I just wind it round my foot and step on the end for quick release.Also,a long towline allows you to get away and turn her.To stop her,either have a line trailing aft ( to rush back for) or just "bang and push".You may end up with the dinghy between the tow and other boats.Avoid this!It can be darned difficult to reboard the tow because You will want to reboard in an awkward place-a bow for instance.

Oars?
Outriggers would be needed or you can't balance huge oars from high modern freeboards or even a fancy coaming plus a too narrow cockpit.Most energy will be lost supporting these monsters without em.
Maneuvering in docks with 2 sweeps is horrendous.You are very wide.

One oar athwart with rudder part over is possible.The keel sucks up some of your side thrust so makes it possible.But that's just theory.I've only one friend does this regular.

Sculling (with one oar ) is superior to both maneuvering. 'though proper oars allow you to put your back into it and seem more efficient thrustwise,the equipment setup is prohibitive and obtrusive.....
Sculling is a powered rudder and can spin your boat in her length.Reverse is a trick though securing the oar (a mere loose loop) will allow it with practise.It does need practise.Do some in the dinghy.Don't let the sculling oar slip from your hand...You can't really tie any because as you get close-quarters,you need ship your oar (or oars) inboard quickly so consider that before the event.

Remember that swinging your rudder hard over! to each side is also a brake....
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Old 09-06-2011, 19:54   #11
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Re: Going engineless

You can do 2 knots sculling that boat but you will need your spinach to keep it up.So,If your sails are drawing at all,use em for distance...the scull is a big help tacking to swing through AND to gather way without falling off..."scull-sailing", if you like.
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Old 10-06-2011, 07:40   #12
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Re: Going engineless

Wow, thanks for all the input! I'm glad I have my dinghy, but I think I will be making a long oar for skulling and I'll give that a try. I'd like to just sail in and out of my slip, but I know with the prevailing winds in my area I'll either have to tack like crazy to get out, or to get back in. It'll be nice to have a few back up options.
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Old 10-06-2011, 08:02   #13
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Re: Going engineless

Why not just attach a small outboard to the back, or am I missing something here?
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Old 10-06-2011, 08:36   #14
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Re: Going engineless

Quote:
Originally Posted by simonmd View Post
Why not just attach a small outboard to the back, or am I missing something here?
I agree, it may be the years I spent as a power boater, but having an engine to get out of a tight spot, is just priceless.
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Old 10-06-2011, 08:55   #15
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Re: Going engineless

Well,obs are handy but picture this...
It's choppy outside the BW...To drop and furl,then lower an ob then start it then have it's prop racing as it pitches out of the water then to gather enough steerage to overcome the bows blowing leeward...meanwhile the massive MV are coming off-plane all-round you,creating huge wakes to compound this...

Or sail into a cramped place and do all the above while drifting albeit without the prop pitching-out...that can work..
But..some places there's just no time for all that drifting.Better to just keep sailing(a furling jib and/or easily dropped main in lazyjacks)...pop the scull out last few feet for the spinning turn or some power strokes to add enough way and you're done.It's actually easier than the possibly-panicky, hard-starting ob routine...Everyone say 35' or less
should have an oar.They are very handy.Great to build upper-body strength,too.
Ever wonder where Popeye got those fore-arms? Twisting a sculling oar!
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