Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 11-02-2014, 14:14   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 3
Getting started

Hey everyone,

I've been dreaming of a boat for most of my life and Ive done a lot of reading. Now is my chance and Im thinking about getting a small liveaboard I've been eyeballing that is in my price range. I need to look it over but if it's what I believe then it would be worth the risk to put the money in to try and finally have one.

My biggest fear. I have a friend who says he is willing to go with me to show me how to work a boat but Im not certain and Ive never sailed before. I have been on a boat with friends a few times but other than my reading, my water experience is limited. To get the boat home I need to bring it through the Florida ICW through Okeechobee. I'm nervous. I believe I can do it just fine but I wanted to reach out and see if anyone has any words of wisdom or recommendations. I was thinking of just motoring it primarily since I don't know how to use the sails yet.

I am also interested in possibly bringing it home going down past the tip of Florida. Thoughts?

I'm fairly familiar with marine electrical standards and I've been looking at boats for a while. Im pretty confident with my overall comfort level, even if I have to do it alone by chance. I just want to hear any advice you have on it before I do.
__________________

__________________
loggiew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 14:59   #2
Registered User
 
sparrowhawk1's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Miami Beach Fl
Boat: Colombia Cc 11.8
Posts: 1,252
Go for it you'll have a great time. My advice to you is If possible take the boat out for day sails, or even just motor around to find out if you have any problems. You didn't say whether it was an inboard or outboard. Make sure it has a clean fuel filter even if you have to add one and fresh fuel.
__________________

__________________
sparrowhawk1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 15:25   #3
Marine Service Provider

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Salish Sea
Boat: Tayana 37
Posts: 243
Re: Getting started

My 2 cents... Buy a small trailerable sailboat that you can handle yourself, won't break the bank, has decent sails, a small outboard and doesn't need much work -- something that is ready to go from day 1. Spend the next 50 weekends sailing with your friend or alone, take courses and listen to what people you trust tell you.

A year from now everything will look different.
__________________
SalishSeaPilot.com cruising guides
jimbim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 16:17   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 70
Re: Getting started

I've been around boats all my life. Trailer boats, that is. I've just stepped up into a 35' flybridge cruiser - and still was/is a bit of a learning curve, even with a lifetime of general boating experience. Personally I wouldn't have the confidence to go into a liveaboard size sailboat right now as I've never done any significant sailing ( a few day hires of a hobies, a few motor/sailor bareboat hires and a handful of afternoons crewing on acquaintances sailboats on WAGS events). Even with said lifetime of 'general' seamanship I'd be taking Jimbim's advice and going small and trailerable for a year or two to get sailing itself 'into my head' before throwing in for a 'big' boat.

Of course you may well be fine - for me though, I'd not feel confidant. Plus - without having done much boatig at all, you won;t have much of an idea what you like and dislike, need vs want, must have vs. 'would be nice'. At least with a year or two of 'learning' you're going to have a beter idea of what you want to buy and what does and doesn;t work for you.

Just my $0.02 and keep on mind I'm a stinkboater so take it as you will. Good luck though - boats and boating is an awesome way to 'get a life'. I couldn't imagine a life where I didn't have my getaway device. Whatever size.
__________________
shufti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 18:24   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 3
Re: Getting started

There is a boat Im going to look at tomorrow which is a bit closer, has a swing keel, trailer comes with, and I believe it still has all the basics I need to live on it. The only part Im really worried about is my level of experience handling the boat. As far as a minimal lifestyle, Im used to it. I've lived off grid for over a year and more recently I've been staying in a camper. What things I may lose is ok. Although I could use advice on washing clothes. How do most handle that?

The boats Im looking at are 25 (the one Im seeing tomorrow) and 27 feet (the one from the original post). The one Im looking at tomorrow appears to only be about 1 1/2 hours away with a trailer so I should be able to move it easy enough as long as the mast lays down.

I definitely plan to spend the next 6 - 12 months practicing around the coast here too before I go anywhere. Hopefully this boat tomorrow will look good and I can soon say I am a boat owner.
__________________
loggiew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2014, 18:38   #6
Registered User
 
sparrowhawk1's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Miami Beach Fl
Boat: Colombia Cc 11.8
Posts: 1,252
One of the best parts of boating is there are millions of options. Only you can decide what's best for you. But if you're planning to live aboard I think 27 foot is about the minimum. A lot of people do it in less but you pay the price either upfront or in inconvenience. As far as laundry goes most people use the laundromat but it's also possible to wash in 5 gallon buckets
__________________
sparrowhawk1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2014, 20:37   #7
cruiser

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: New Iberia, LA
Boat: Alden 44
Posts: 202
Re: Getting started

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimbim View Post
My 2 cents... Buy a small trailerable sailboat that you can handle yourself, won't break the bank, has decent sails, a small outboard and doesn't need much work -- something that is ready to go from day 1. Spend the next 50 weekends sailing with your friend or alone, take courses and listen to what people you trust tell you.

A year from now everything will look different.
This is excellent advice. Could not have said it better.
__________________
satdiver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2014, 01:12   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Sailing in Europe
Boat: Bénéteau First 25.7
Posts: 36
Re: Getting started

How was the 25 footer you just visited ? From your interesting description, she sounds the right sort of boat, and you seem to have taken into account the very sound advice from Jimbim.

During the first 6 months, try to sail with a crew on board, it makes things so much easier, and you can discuss all options when meeting difficulties, or how not to get into trouble !

(Guy Delafontaine, former owner of the boat ''Double Trouble'' in England.)
__________________
Delafontaine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2014, 02:11   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Underway in the Med -
Boat: Jeanneau 40 DS SoulMates
Posts: 1,905
Images: 1
Re: Getting started

i like stories so let me tell you a story -- we were in eliz city nc and a nasty little storm was brewing and all the slip were full except one -- a boat came in and everyone went to help and the guy was bring it in but would not answer his radio -- so as he got close someone got on the stern of one boat and yelled out instructions -- the guy turned and headed in but just as he was about to get in he cut the engine and tide pushed him to far so everyone yelled go around again - he did same thing - someone yelled a bit more throttle next time and he did but way to much and as he nosed past the piling he froze and did not cut back on the throttle and everyone was yelling to cut the engine - he did just before the hit the steel wall very hard - one in we all tried to help and talk with him - he said he had just bought the boat in mass and headed south with no zero nada knowledge and was headed to fla with his wife 2kids a dog and cat - he was going to live the life in fla at a friends dock in ft lauderdale -
he said his radio quit working so i went below to take a look and it was a mess - turned out somewhere along the way a hose broke and it took them forever to figure that out and get the seacock closed but in the meantime everything got wet and the smell was not good - i began to check out the radio and turned it on and it worked - when i showed him he said oh you have to push and hold the on button for it to work
in the meantime some south african friends of ours looked at the mast that was wavering a bit -- all the shrouds were lose - so they spent the better part of the day fixing it --
they told us their schedule and i asked how they were going to get down the icw in the dark and their response was the icw was lite at night -
then they told us they were leaving the next day at which someone had a serious heart to heart as they were going to cross the albamara sound in a blow - not one person there would go out and we had a lot of ocean crossers there -
as for money - they had money for fuel and a little for food -
oh i forgot one thing they broke an anchor when they hit the wall - and did not not think they had another anchor - an old guy there and i began to try and find them a used anchor somewhere - someone else was helping on another issue and found a new anchor in a cockpit locker

at the end of the day we all knew there was a God that looks out after sailors for if there was not they would all have be a statistic --

one of the things we have done is adopt new folks and help them get south -- but we would never ever have helped these guys - we did not want to get involved with someone who could potentially become a statistic and sink their boat and had absolutely no knowledge -

in the end they with the help of a lot of folks they figured out they were way over their head as they put it and decided to spend the winter in elizabeth city - which they did - we all breathed a sigh of relief as we did not want to have to turn around and come and rescue them

this is a long way of saying it is not that simple -- learn a bit before you take off - learn about the boat and seamanship and getting in and out and anchoring ect ect ect
__________________
just our thoughts and opinions
chuck and svsoulmates
In Marmaris Turkey for the winter
chuckr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-02-2014, 02:50   #10
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Re: Getting started

Don't make life unnecessarily difficult for yourself. Buy close to home (a day trip away) - even at the price of paying more at purchase! Very likely you will recoup the cash by not having to get the boat and you fully shipshape at a distance and in a short timescale. Plus a lot less likely for things to go pear shaped, personally or financially.

The good news is that boats not rocket science to get a handle on the basics , (with some effort, wit and time)........but takes practice to get competent. Dont make your learning curve hard for yourself - it takes the fun away as well!

The biggest challenge you will have is buying a boat that is not a pos that turns out to be a money pit.
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-02-2014, 17:13   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 3
Re: Getting started

As much as it tears my heart out I have decided to wait on the boat. *sigh* Patience. Thank you guys for your thoughts. I'll keep it in mind for next time.
__________________
loggiew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-02-2014, 02:26   #12
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Re: Getting started

Quote:
Originally Posted by loggiew View Post
As much as it tears my heart out I have decided to wait on the boat. *sigh* Patience. Thank you guys for your thoughts. I'll keep it in mind for next time.
Patience is a virtue !......so they say .

but the good news is that the learning does not need to wait, both theory and hands on - sailing and poking around boats (become a tyre kicker!).
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-12-2015, 02:38   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Sailing in Europe
Boat: Bénéteau First 25.7
Posts: 36
Re: Getting started

Hello loggiew, How have you progressed during the last 22 months ?
Are you now the proud owner of a nice yacht ? We are all interested to know how are things with you. At the moment, it is a seller's market !

Happy New Year and fair winds.
__________________

__________________
Delafontaine is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:35.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.