Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 07-07-2015, 22:33   #16
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 10,657
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffr View Post
Yes the steps at BYC are good when the water is high, but not when low. What can work is a long 2x6 board with two lines tided on one end. Tie off the lines to the cleats on the each side of the bow. (this worked well on our Mirage which didn't have an anchor right on the bow).

If the slope of the board is too steep in the spring or late fall you can add some 1x1's across to stop your feet from slipping.

I have seen others use this "ramp" at the top of the stairs you've shown in the photo.

A second option is to get a ramp built which floats at the side of your boat - I know there were one or two built for the big boats...
Macbeth,

You can make the above approach work, adjust the length for the tidal swings you expect. I like leading a spinny or genny halyard to the center of the bow pulpit so you have an extra thing to grab onto when coming aboard.

In Europe these are called "passerelle", and maybe "boarding boards" in the US. Try Googling on those and look for ideas and enhancements.
Ann

Ann
__________________

__________________
Ann, with Jim, aboard US s/v Insatiable II, in Oz, very long term cruisers
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 02:45   #17
Registered User
 
Juho's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Finland
Boat: Nauticat 32
Posts: 716
Re: Getting from land to my boat

How about having a ladder in the bow? Note the two sets of plastic covered hooks for adjusting the height of the ladder.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Keulatikkaat.jpg
Views:	148
Size:	264.6 KB
ID:	104887  
__________________

__________________
Juho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2015, 03:00   #18
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,726
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Bows to the quay mooring is almost universal in the Baltic. It has a number of advantages over Med mooring - rudder protection, privacy, easier maneuvering, no problem with davits. You need a split pulpit and a ladder like that depicted above.

Sent from my D6633 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________
"Parce que je suis heureux en mer, et peut-Ítre pour sauver mon ame. . . "
Dockhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 14:40   #19
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Boat: Niagara 31
Posts: 252
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
Tie a line between the two bow dock cleats. Use low streach line and make sure its tight. In the middle run another line, as thick as you have, from the dock line onto the bow cleat of your boat. You could have two lines, one onto each bow cleat.

When you stand on the thick line the boat will come in a bit, reducing the gap and you can step off.

BTW if you stand on the line for too long you will get that sinking feeling, so adjust the stern lines appropriately.


Mark.
Not sure I understand this. So I tie a line to the two bow cleats. Across the top of the deck ? Call this line A. Then I tie another thick line (B) to the middle of A and to the harbor wall ? Then I stand on B and it brings the boat closer to the wall ? If I understand this correctly, this would be very awkward on my boat. The line would go over the anchor and I'd have to clamber over the front to be able to put a foot on line B.

As I understand, it's normal practice to have the two bow lines going at about 45 degrees to the shore. Not much point in standing on them. But maybe an extra thick line from a bow chock (which are to the sides) straight ahead to the wall might work. Leaving the dock would be OK, just let this extra line dangle. On returning to the dock, retrieve the two bow lines, then the "dangling" line.
__________________
macbeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 14:51   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Boat: Niagara 31
Posts: 252
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffr View Post
Yes the steps at BYC are good when the water is high, but not when low. What can work is a long 2x6 board with two lines tided on one end. Tie off the lines to the cleats on the each side of the bow. (this worked well on our Mirage which didn't have an anchor right on the bow).
2X6 ! Bit narrow for me ! 2x10 maybe. Doesn't the board swing from side to side ? Even then, all this does is bring me the face of the pulpit rails. My legs are not long enough to swing one over the top rail ! The upper pulpit rail sticks out about 2' from the tip of the deck, and about 3' high off it. The lower pulpit about 1' and 14". So if I put one foot on the lower rail for example, I'd have to lean backwards and try to swing a leg over the top rail. Hmm, wish I was 25 years old, but I'm not. (Nearly three times that !)
__________________
macbeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 14:55   #21
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Boat: Niagara 31
Posts: 252
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juho View Post
How about having a ladder in the bow? Note the two sets of plastic covered hooks for adjusting the height of the ladder.
Nice if you have a walk -thru bow. I don't. With my pulpit, I'd be halfway up the forstay to get over the upper pulpit rail, and how would I get down once over the upper pulpit rail !?
__________________
macbeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 15:09   #22
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 10,657
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Macbeth,

I'm gonna talk turkey to you, a bit. I'm older than you. Let's assume you have at least 10 yrs., maybe 20, left to spend sailing, and you don't want to get hurt getting on and off your boat.

What is going to keep you in the best nick is to bite the bullet and have a new bow pulpit made, with a pass-through. Then you can either make or have made a light weight but strong enough for your weight passerelle (probably of aluminium) with a rail or at least pipes and a hand line. Now is only the beginning of the problem. You will become less limber, less well balanced, and less strong with the passage of the next coming years. It is the human condition, and even working out 4 times a week will only keep you fit till the first time you get the flu or something, and the condition drops off you like humpty off the wall. You might need a passerelle now. You'll need it for sure in the future. You won't handle the situation any younger, either. It is doable: this is a problem with a solution. Be grateful for that.

I hate telling other people they need to spend more money on themselves than they feel comfortable with, but really, if you want to keep doing what you love, I sure don't see another way. Sorry if this grieves you. I can tell you I really hate it as applied to myself.

Good luck with it.

Ann
__________________
Ann, with Jim, aboard US s/v Insatiable II, in Oz, very long term cruisers
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2015, 15:38   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: East of the river CT
Boat: Oday Mariner 19 , Four Winns Marquis 16 OB, Kingfisher III
Posts: 439
Send a message via Skype™ to Colin A
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Here is a few pictures from Dashew's site of some he's seen out in the wild.
SetSail ¬Ľ Blog Archive ¬Ľ Passerals Part Two
__________________
mysite: Colinism.com
Work for
Bass Products
Colin A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2015, 15:15   #24
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 10,657
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Hey, Colin A, thank you for posting those pictures. If you Google on "passerelles" there are many concepts shown, but good on you for the link!

The passerelle based on the aluminum ladder looks really good.

The OP, macbeth, might prefer one with a hand line, really up to him.

Ann
__________________
Ann, with Jim, aboard US s/v Insatiable II, in Oz, very long term cruisers
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-07-2015, 21:00   #25
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Boat: Niagara 31
Posts: 252
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
Macbeth,

I'm gonna talk turkey to you, a bit. I'm older than you. Let's assume you have at least 10 yrs., maybe 20, left to spend sailing, and you don't want to get hurt getting on and off your boat.

What is going to keep you in the best nick is to bite the bullet and have a new bow pulpit made, with a pass-through. Then you can either make or have made a light weight but strong enough for your weight passerelle (probably of aluminium) with a rail or at least pipes and a hand line. Now is only the beginning of the problem. You will become less limber, less well balanced, and less strong with the passage of the next coming years. It is the human condition, and even working out 4 times a week will only keep you fit till the first time you get the flu or something, and the condition drops off you like humpty off the wall. You might need a passerelle now. You'll need it for sure in the future. You won't handle the situation any younger, either. It is doable: this is a problem with a solution. Be grateful for that.

I hate telling other people they need to spend more money on themselves than they feel comfortable with, but really, if you want to keep doing what you love, I sure don't see another way. Sorry if this grieves you. I can tell you I really hate it as applied to myself.

Good luck with it.

Ann
Thanks Ann. Appreciate your posting. I agree, a passerelle will be absolutely necessary. I think I can run a board from the shore to the RHS of the Pulpit. I'm thinking of having a small step at the end of the board, with a corresponding small fold-up removable step on the foredeck. With these, I could step over the rails.

The distance from the shore to the pulpit is about 4 feet. I was thinking I would get a 8' plank so to make it easy to span the gap, i.e. the weight of the back part of the plank would stop the front end from plunging into the water ! Any other suggestions for pushing out the passerelle from the shore ? And how do you push/pull the passerelle away from the boat, once on the boat. I thought of attaching a rope to the boat end of the plank to a pulley on the shore. Pull the rope from the boat and the plank goes backwards onto shore. Similarly, on approaching the shore have a loop of line at the boat end of the plank, so I could pull it out.

In other words, it's all very well to say a passerelle is a necessity, but how to handle it from boat and shore has to be considered/invented.

Comments or suggestions welcomed.
__________________
macbeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-07-2015, 21:02   #26
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Boat: Niagara 31
Posts: 252
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
....... or at least pipes and a hand line.



Ann
What do you mean by "PIPES" ?
__________________
macbeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-07-2015, 21:28   #27
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 10,657
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by macbeth View Post
What do you mean by "PIPES" ?
Look at the picture in the link to Dashew's pictures of passerelles. The one at berth 5007 is a long fold-up one, with two "pipes" that support a hand line.

It will be a chore to deal with, I'm afraid. You'll be taking it with the boat and deploying it each time you dock. And you have to figure out a way to stow it. You need to be able to secure it on deck, so it'll ride okay on the dock, so possibly some pad eyes and straps.

Maybe you have room in a quarter berth to stow it suspended from the overhead? It could live lying on straps, and you just haul it out as needed. It is going to be important to keep it light, to be handled practically.

Ann
__________________
Ann, with Jim, aboard US s/v Insatiable II, in Oz, very long term cruisers
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2015, 15:00   #28
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Boat: Niagara 31
Posts: 252
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Thanks for all the responses, especially from Ann Cate. I won't need to carry the passerelle around with me, as I only have one dock to contend with. I have devised a method whereby I can leave it on the dock and get it to the boat when necessary. Thanks again.
__________________
macbeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2015, 16:02   #29
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 10,657
Re: Getting from land to my boat

GOOD ON YA! macbeth, well done!

...and thank you for the kind words.


FWIW, I think the poster who gave us the link to Dashew's pictures did a great job with that, tool, and I say THANK YOU, sir!

Ann
__________________
Ann, with Jim, aboard US s/v Insatiable II, in Oz, very long term cruisers
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-07-2015, 21:46   #30
Senior Cruiser
 
roverhi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kona, Hawaii, Carlsbad, CA
Boat: 1969 Pearson 35 #108 & 1976 Sabre 28
Posts: 6,002
Send a message via Yahoo to roverhi
Re: Getting from land to my boat

Same kind of tie up at the Marina. Used about 5' of heavy chain from the buoy and line there after. The weight of the chain keeps the boat closer to the buoy. At the bow, have two side lines and a line from the bow to the dock. Haul the boat in as far as I can with the center bowline, wrap it around the cleat, lean out and grab the bow pulpit and then walk up the bow line.

Don't have a bowsprit which could complicate matters if it is angled upward so that it sits way above the dock level. With our tides, the bow goes from a 1' or two above the dock to a 1' or two below. Boarding at high tide is challenging as the stern line is effectively shortened so it's hard to pull the bow in really close to the dock. Have to lean way out to grab the pulpit.
__________________

__________________
Peter O.
'Ae'a Pearson 35
roverhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Getting to the Rio Dulce by Land cd30ketch General Sailing Forum 5 19-09-2010 14:58
Land Life / Boat Life Ocean Girl Families, Kids and Pets Afloat 59 14-06-2010 03:04
For Trade: Land in Florida or Spain for Boat Greg67 Classifieds Archive 0 20-03-2010 07:48
Land Boat For Sale ssullivan Classifieds Archive 12 24-06-2008 12:50



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:57.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.