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Old 16-08-2009, 01:55   #31
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I'm amused at such detailed docking instructions for the female crew. I posted a serious rant on this subject on an atlantic/caribbean thread, but to keep this simple: The only instruction the female crew needs is how to dock the boat, while the male crew uses his superior upper body strength to fend off pilings, tighten lines, etc., rather than standing in the cockpit moving levers back and forth. It's ok guys, the girls don't yell much.
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Old 16-08-2009, 02:45   #32
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Who needs more than one person onboard in order to dock alongside.

Even Captain Jack can do it

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Old 18-08-2009, 07:32   #33
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thanks for the link to the video Talbot. Since learnign that method for singl handing I now use it all the time. Cptn jack sure makes it lok easy. A couple of points that I would like to emphasize are 1) find out what speed your boat needs to be at to maintain steerage and try to keep the boat at that speed and 2) when using this method do not take the boat out of gear and slip her into neutral. The reason for #2 is that the boat depends on the force of the engine going forward to keep tension on the springline which keeps the boat against the dock. I slipped it in neutral once and the boat started drifting backwards and slipped the cleat. Fortuantely there was a person ob board to pass me the stern line. Lesson learned.
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Old 24-08-2009, 19:53   #34
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Ugh I feel your pain. We are in a 38ft heavy displacement cruiser that isn't ours and is very nice. I find myself getting very sweaty and having to pee every time we approach our slip. We are in a leward slip and some days it can be pretty windy right in our marina. Yesterday we had 15Knots right on our stern blowing us into our not-so-soft slip. I usually have the lady step (although we are guilty of jumping once or twice) out onto the dock with the stern line and help to break the boats momentum while I apply stern propulsion. I am interested in trying out a midship spring line but have a problem with the term "experiment" when it comes to someone else's 100+k investment.
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Old 24-08-2009, 20:13   #35
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Ugh I feel your pain. We are in a 38ft heavy displacement cruiser that isn't ours and is very nice. I find myself getting very sweaty and having to pee every time we approach our slip. We are in a leward slip and some days it can be pretty windy right in our marina. Yesterday we had 15Knots right on our stern blowing us into our not-so-soft slip. I usually have the lady step (although we are guilty of jumping once or twice) out onto the dock with the stern line and help to break the boats momentum while I apply stern propulsion. I am interested in trying out a midship spring line but have a problem with the term "experiment" when it comes to someone else's 100+k investment.
its all physics baby. mid ship line over a cleat near the stern of the boat and forward propulsion means that the vectors align so that the boat is forced to the dock. Not really an experiment.
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Old 24-08-2009, 21:37   #36
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its all physics baby. mid ship line over a cleat near the stern of the boat and forward propulsion means that the vectors align so that the boat is forced to the dock. Not really an experiment.
I hear you but my girlfriend dropping the line in the water isn't physics. Neither is me panicking. Or maybe it is. Either way, we have a good public dock we can go try this stuff out on early in the morning away from any distractions. I would rather do that than try this for the first time with a 15 knot tailwind on labor day weekend with everyone and their mother watching.
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Old 25-08-2009, 09:20   #37
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Know what you mean. The chance of screwing up is a lot greater when people are watching. Where are you at in SD. I keep my boat in Coronado Cays.
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Old 25-08-2009, 09:34   #38
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My best docking ever was with someone watching. I used body weight, wind, and current as I put the boat stern to into the slip without pulling, tugging, revving, or pushing. The fella said he wanted to see how it was done. I told him I got lucky.

It has never been that easy, and I don't think it will be.

We did some touch and goes on the new boat this weekend. Out of the slip, back in, then out again. Docking the Coronado 25 was fairly easy alone. The Bristol 35 backs like a drunk brick. I did get one shot straight up the slip without having to pull, push or otherwise influence the boat from outside it. Twice I realized it wasn't happening and bailed back out.. the other times it was close enough that you could adjust once you had a dock line in hand, or just push a piling slightly.

I think having to rely on someone to do something at a particular time in the docking can lead to trouble. If you can't stop the boat without someone grabbing a dock line and snubbing it you have trouble if they miss, or just space out for a moment. I am not there yet on the new boat, but I am willing to practice, though I would rather be sailing.
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Old 25-08-2009, 10:08   #39
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Maybe i'll try one more time... I will be sailing with a relatively inexperienced crew person. Guess I'll have her put the fenders down and stand at the bow with a boat hook. If we back in i'll have her first get the bow lines then give me slack so i can get the stern lines tied off. If we pull in bow first we'll do it the same way. How does this sound? I'd like to keep it simple initially. Don't think I want her jumping off with a spring line.
After she takes care of the fenders, ask her to sit down and make herself comfy at a location she will not get in the way (until she becomes more experienced at this of course..)

I singlehand and found using a dedicated continuous (temporary) line very helpful in docking: I tie this line to the bow and stern cleats of the (dock, finger pier) side of the boat prior to my approach and have it ready to grab and step off the boat as soon as she is in 'position.'

The continuous line provides bow and stern tie down points and, depending where the dock cleats are, also serves as spring line(s.)

This line is about 15% longer than the LOA of the boat, run - obviously - on the outside of everything and coiled at your step off point for easy grab and go.

Once everything is secured, you can then transfer to your permanent mooring lines.

Just one of umpteen possible ways - For me, this simple system has worked for many years.

As far as boat 'control' in a variety of conditions, just keep sailing.

Good luck and enjoy the boat!

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Old 25-08-2009, 10:31   #40
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I never toss a line to someone I don’t know on the dock. You have no idea of their knowledge. I have seen too many people get tossed a line and start pulling as hard as they can smashing your boat against the dock. Another risk is their safety. They may try to muscle the boat in instead of getting a half turn on a cleat.
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Old 25-08-2009, 10:43   #41
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I put in a cradle with 5/8 line to keep my bow from accidentally wandering into the next slip.
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Old 25-08-2009, 10:53   #42
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We teach a technique for single line docking. This can be done with one person, two is easier.

There is a point about 1/4 of the distance from the transom to the bow at which, if you attach a line and then tie to the dock opposite the transom, then put the boat in forward, the boat will suck into the dock. FIND THIS POINT BEFORE LEAVING THE DOCK.

When it is in the right position, you should be able to adjust the attitude of the boat. Turn the wheel away from the dock, the bow should move away from the dock and the stern comes in. Turn the wheel toward the dock the bow will turn in and the stern out.

If you boat has a metal toe rail with scuppers, attach a shackle to the point. If not, find another strong point. The primary winch is a good place to start. On the dock tie a line which, when taut, will be opposite the transom when the hook is attached to the shackle.

Before coming into the dock attach your bow and stern breast lines and drape them over your lifelines. Attach a centre line to the midship cleat, if you have one, or to the shrouds.

When you come into the dock and get the boat stopped, put the boat in neutral and smartly step off the the boat and attach the dock line prepared previously to the shackle. Get back on and put the transmission in forward. After the boat has aligned itself to the dock, LEAVE THE TRANSMISSION IN FORWARD. Step off and tie your breast lines and use the centre line tie as a forward spring. The single line dock line can serve as an aft spring. Or you could attach another.

If the cross wind is too strong just get the centre line attached the dock first.

I have also seen a line with a large hook that can catch a cleat or dock ring.

I have done this in a cross wind and it does work.
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