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Old 16-04-2013, 18:00   #121
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

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Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
i use a midships line for stabilizing boat and preventing it from leaving the dock . it works. then bow then stern line as i step onto the dock.

i do not usually dock my boat during high winds--and i dont usually leave then return to a dock with my boat. dock time is repair time.
That's exactly what I do too.

In addition, I have two lines along the starboard side of the slip -- one, angled, to corral the very tender bow, and one to keep the stern off the boat to my starboard, because my boat is only 31' but all the slips here are for 40' boats (I've moved to a different marina). My boat can be blown right through the pilings onto the starboard side boat. Rather than risk crashing into other boats in a high wind, I have, in the past, brought my boat into the club's T-dock. It's sheltered from the north and the south, and I can use the engine to keep me off of bows or sterns to the east or west of me. I believe in respecting one's learning curve.

I typically bring my boat into dock by myself, so for me, it's all about early control.
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Old 17-04-2013, 09:57   #122
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

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Originally Posted by Capt Phil View Post
Those were the years, Geoduck... commercial fishing taught you how to handle a boat in the worst weather, gear breaking constantly, drunk or insane crew and navigating by the seat of your pants with no guarantee of coming home alive or making a decent $ share. I look back on those times as character building and still wonder why I kept going back season after season.
It was the same in the towboat industry as well. At least we were able to duck the worst of the weather for fear of losing the tow! Back in the 60's there wasn't much in the way of safety gear either... no survival suits, liferafts and not much of a Coast Guard to speak of. Went a lot of funerals with no bodies as I recall. If you went overboard, that was the end. But I still managed to blank out the bad times and remember the good ones! By the way, I don't find you provocative at all! Phil
Capt Phil - sounds like you've been there.
Actually, I got my 1st lessons in the Sea of Cortez on a 25' folk boat that I had when I was 15 years old. I sailed off by myself from Newport Beach and spent a season down there exploring. I got into commercial fishing a couple of years later on a tuna boat out of Pedro. Salmon fishing/diving/marine construction/fishing AK all came after fun & games at the university of South Vietnam, of which I am a combat engineer alumni from 1968-69. The sailing adventures - med, caribbean, canal to AK, deliveries, etc. came when I couldn't find a diving job. Bought 1st fish boat in early 70's - chased salmon & tuna off & on 22 years. Had a bawl!! Now I just goof off with my old 72 yr old ketch up in the NW - take my Nimble 20 trailer sailor to Columbia River, Mead & Powell, Sea of Cortez, etc in the winter.
No complaints here! Outside of the usual old man aches & pains - life is
good!
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Old 21-04-2013, 13:17   #123
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In 30 kt. cross wind (yikes!), I would anchor in shelter some where and hunker down until things got less frisky. I always have books, booze and food aboard to wait out any blow, even in local waters. In fact, I rather relish getting into a situation whereby I foil the contrary forces of nature and now have an excuse for an impromptu party.Of course I don't have to be anywhere Monday morning.Trying some exercise that I can't see my way through and has a high potential to damage my and other nearby craft could end up ruining many sailing days in the future while I make repairs.
The patient sailor (almost) always has fair winds.
In my younger,brasher, days when sailing a beat up steel sailboat ,I would try almost anything , and now I have the enemies to prove it.
Mrohr, absolutely LOVE that closing line....LOL........ Done a bit of that myself!
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Old 29-04-2013, 19:56   #124
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

Regarding the original post on this thread and its questions let me add my two cents worth.

I was raised in South Florida (Miami) and the Gulfstream was almost my backyard. I have come to realize that disaster will surely follow any effort that exceeds the abilities of either the vessel, her Captain, or her crew. Expecting a happy ending while ignoring this rule usually ends with somebody writing a check.


In your example, a 30+ knot cross wind would prevent any vessel from docking safely in the described slip unless you had a entire college football team on shore and on the adjacent vessels to catch lines and fend off. Even then it would be tricky.


Instead , let me share some wisdom I learned the hard ( and at times expensive) way. Know when to say NO!


We have a brass plaque aboard that puts it this way. "A superior sailor is best recognized as one who uses his superior judgement to stay out of situations requiring the use of his superior skills"


As a rule we always go to the fuel dock first in a unfamiliar marina. It tends to be a simple docking and even if we only take on a few gallons, it gives us a chance to go look at the slip they want to put us in BEFORE we are committed to a impossible situation. I can't tell you how many thousands of dollars in damages we've saved by following this one rule.


In the specified example, I would use the fuel dock if it could be done safely and then just wait until the wind abated.


No safe fuel dock available? That's where a good anchor comes in handy.
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Old 29-04-2013, 20:06   #125
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

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Originally Posted by Sailor954 View Post
Regarding the original post on this thread and its questions let me add my two cents worth.

I was raised in South Florida (Miami) and the Gulfstream was almost my backyard. I have come to realize that disaster will surely follow any effort that exceeds the abilities of either the vessel, her Captain, or her crew. Expecting a happy ending while ignoring this rule usually ends with somebody writing a check.


In your example, a 30+ knot cross wind would prevent any vessel from docking safely in the described slip unless you had a entire college football team on shore and on the adjacent vessels to catch lines and fend off. Even then it would be tricky.


Instead , let me share some wisdom I learned the hard ( and at times expensive) way. Know when to say NO!


We have a brass plaque aboard that puts it this way. "A superior sailor is best recognized as one who uses his superior judgement to stay out of situations requiring the use of his superior skills"


As a rule we always go to the fuel dock first in a unfamiliar marina. It tends to be a simple docking and even if we only take on a few gallons, it gives us a chance to go look at the slip they want to put us in BEFORE we are committed to a impossible situation. I can't tell you how many thousands of dollars in damages we've saved by following this one rule.


In the specified example, I would use the fuel dock if it could be done safely and then just wait until the wind abated.


No safe fuel dock available? That's where a good anchor comes in handy.
Thats great advice! I think I will definitely start at the fuel dock from now on in unfamiliar marinas!
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Old 29-04-2013, 20:08   #126
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

No question about how I do it. I anchor out and wait for conditions to moderate. Or find a dock space that's more bow into the wind. I know that's no help in teaching how to dock in a 30mph cross wind, or maybe it is. Learn to be patient and pick your battles.
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Old 29-04-2013, 20:09   #127
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

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Originally Posted by jmcdboater View Post
Mrohr, absolutely LOVE that closing line....LOL........ Done a bit of that myself!

When I bought this bigger boat, that's what I did. Rather than try to negotiate a boat I wasn't fully familiar with in a tight marina in high wind, I took it to my sailing club, which has T-docks. I'd tie up there for the night and move the boat back home when the wind died down. Anchoring in a sheltered spot would have been an option too. By doing that i was able to learn to dock this boat, which with its high freeboard can be tricky, in a gradual and controlled way.
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Old 29-04-2013, 20:10   #128
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor954 View Post
Regarding the original post on this thread and its questions let me add my two cents worth.

I was raised in South Florida (Miami) and the Gulfstream was almost my backyard. I have come to realize that disaster will surely follow any effort that exceeds the abilities of either the vessel, her Captain, or her crew. Expecting a happy ending while ignoring this rule usually ends with somebody writing a check.


In your example, a 30+ knot cross wind would prevent any vessel from docking safely in the described slip unless you had a entire college football team on shore and on the adjacent vessels to catch lines and fend off. Even then it would be tricky.


Instead , let me share some wisdom I learned the hard ( and at times expensive) way. Know when to say NO!


We have a brass plaque aboard that puts it this way. "A superior sailor is best recognized as one who uses his superior judgement to stay out of situations requiring the use of his superior skills"


As a rule we always go to the fuel dock first in a unfamiliar marina. It tends to be a simple docking and even if we only take on a few gallons, it gives us a chance to go look at the slip they want to put us in BEFORE we are committed to a impossible situation. I can't tell you how many thousands of dollars in damages we've saved by following this one rule.


In the specified example, I would use the fuel dock if it could be done safely and then just wait until the wind abated.


No safe fuel dock available? That's where a good anchor comes in handy.

That's a terrific idea!
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Old 30-04-2013, 02:29   #129
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor954 View Post
Regarding the original post on this thread and its questions let me add my two cents worth.

I was raised in South Florida (Miami) and the Gulfstream was almost my backyard. I have come to realize that disaster will surely follow any effort that exceeds the abilities of either the vessel, her Captain, or her crew. Expecting a happy ending while ignoring this rule usually ends with somebody writing a check.


In your example, a 30+ knot cross wind would prevent any vessel from docking safely in the described slip unless you had a entire college football team on shore and on the adjacent vessels to catch lines and fend off. Even then it would be tricky.


Instead , let me share some wisdom I learned the hard ( and at times expensive) way. Know when to say NO!


We have a brass plaque aboard that puts it this way. "A superior sailor is best recognized as one who uses his superior judgement to stay out of situations requiring the use of his superior skills"


As a rule we always go to the fuel dock first in a unfamiliar marina. It tends to be a simple docking and even if we only take on a few gallons, it gives us a chance to go look at the slip they want to put us in BEFORE we are committed to a impossible situation. I can't tell you how many thousands of dollars in damages we've saved by following this one rule.


In the specified example, I would use the fuel dock if it could be done safely and then just wait until the wind abated.


No safe fuel dock available? That's where a good anchor comes in handy.

I certainly agree that the best option here would be anchor out. But let's take a walk down you friendly neighborhood marina docks (yours or mine - doesn't matter). Let's look carefully at the anchors hanging off the bowrollers of the boats - hmmmm, nice shiny CQR, only water it has ever seen is rain. Ah even better - here's a bruce copy in stainless steel - looks great, but never been down.

I could go on, but let's face it, damn few coastal sailors have the ground tackle to anchor out in 30+ knots. Even if they have the tackle - they don't have the technique.

Sailing in 15+ knots is not unusual in the Baltic. A couple of summer ago, I spent almost 2 weeks sailing around in gale force winds. Such is life.

Again, for all those who have contributed docking solutions - thanks. I'll be practicing this over the next month or so and let you all know
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Old 30-04-2013, 03:15   #130
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

Great Posts guys, I would like to say that anchoring in 30 knots is something we all should be comfortable with and just requires looking at your charts for good holding with good gear you can trust, best to be sorted before you leave the dock.
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Old 30-04-2013, 21:15   #131
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

Sailor954.........Really good advice, love your direction !
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Old 30-04-2013, 21:32   #132
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

I am very good at docking. I seldom have a problem even if it's really tight. If I had to dock in 30 knots on the beam, I might decide to not do it. I think I could pull it off, maybe, but it would have to be pretty important.
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Old 01-05-2013, 00:30   #133
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

Whether or not you expect to be in that situation, or would choose to put yourself in that situation, I think it's a good idea to have thought it through.

There are occasions when you're committed, either by force of overwhelming circumstance, or by sudden changes in conditions, to do things you would prefer not to do.

What say the dock you are tied to in a strong wind becomes untenable (or, as once happened to me, your boat simply pulls it apart) , and you have to move to another dock, in a situation where there are no safe places to anchor?

Or you have a medical emergency on board which justifies putting the boat at a small risk?
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Old 01-05-2013, 01:11   #134
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

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Whether or not you expect to be in that situation, or would choose to put yourself in that situation, I think it's a good idea to have thought it through.

There are occasions when you're committed, either by force of overwhelming circumstance, or by sudden changes in conditions, to do things you would prefer not to do.

What say the dock you are tied to in a strong wind becomes untenable (or, as once happened to me, your boat simply pulls it apart) , and you have to move to another dock, in a situation where there are no safe places to anchor?

Or you have a medical emergency on board which justifies putting the boat at a small risk?

Thank you Andrew.

There are times when choices are few. The harbour may be somewhere where there is no anchoring alternative (the island of Bornholm comes to mind here), or as you note, medical emergencies etc.

I've had to pull this off, and while we succeeded - it wasn't pretty and having my wife have to make a "death defying leap" over the bow is not something we aspire to repeat.

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Old 04-03-2014, 04:47   #135
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Re: Docking In Heavy Wind

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....

Again, for all those who have contributed docking solutions - thanks. I'll be practicing this over the next month or so and let you all know
? ? ? ?

(Emoticon of tapping foot impatiently )
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