Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 27-07-2010, 09:30   #31
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,573
Images: 240
Dockhead:
HyLyte’s method doesn’t force others to stumble across multiple rafted dinks, to get to the dock & back.
It’s not, at all, too much trouble, to be courteous to others, and appropriately share a scarce resource, like a “taxi stand” dock.

rwidman
I don’t think anyone’s right to remain ignorant, overrides another’s right to remain safe.
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 09:34   #32
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
I've read dozens of boating books and I have participated in several boating forums. Nowhere have I seen this posted except here.

When considered in the context of possibly damaging another boat, it makes sense, but when considered in the context of keeping the motor out of the water when not in use to prevent marine growth, leaving it up makes sense. That is what many boaters have learned from reading their motor's owners manuals or listening to advice from other boaters.
Dozens of boating books! I applaud your efforts to learn the ins and outs of cruising. I'm sure books are helpful. The fact is, however, that it's fairly common knowledge among the cruising community that it's flat-out bad manners to tilt an outboard at a dinghy dock. The problem is that there are too many newbs out there who haven't gotten far enough in their cruiser manuals to realize that those little thingies on the end of the prop are called "blades," and that rubbing your blades against someone else's inflatable tubes is a really bad idea.

Regarding marine growth, most folks are not leaving their dinks on a dinghy dock long enough that marine growth is an issue. If you'd rather cut another cruiser's boat than risk a bit of marine growth on your outboard, I'm afraid you're not ready for the dinghy dock scene.
__________________

__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 09:49   #33
Registered User
 
Zanshin's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Caribbean
Boat: Jeanneau 57
Posts: 1,621
The dinghy dock in Gustavia, St. Barths is a prime example - only about 30 feet of space but usually far more than 30 dinghies tied up there. Leave a very long painter and more often than not you will need to crawl over two dinghies to get to yours. The Willie T at the Bight in the BVI is another example of a dock that can get very crowded.

Common courtesy is to leave the dinghy engine down at the dock as well.
__________________
-Zanshin (SV Zanshin)
Zanshin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 09:53   #34
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,737
Quote:
Originally Posted by svcambria View Post
It is common practice, I would have thought universal practice, to keep the outboard down. Less common practice is to use a long painter. Both are so necessary when up to eighty dinghies are sharing 80 feet of dock space (or less) - a common occurrence abroad...

Michael
I only tip mine up if running up on a beach. It wouldn't occur to me to tip it up at a dock, nor do I recall ever seeing anyone do this.
__________________
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 09:59   #35
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,737
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
I'm probably older than you.

I've read dozens of boating books and I have participated in several boating forums. Nowhere have I seen this posted except here.

When considered in the context of possibly damaging another boat, it makes sense, but when considered in the context of keeping the motor out of the water when not in use to prevent marine growth, leaving it up makes sense. That is what many boaters have learned from reading their motor's owners manuals or listening to advice from other boaters.

I just think you're going to have a very difficult time convincing strangers that you know best and that they should follow your rules. I am not saying that you are wrong, just that if you expect everyone you meet in life to see things your way, you are going to be very disappointed.

Perhaps signs should be posted.
Rules, laws, and signs are for inconsiderate jerks who would intentionally ignore a polite request to keep the motor down.

For a friendly, considerate sailor like you, a polite word from a few of your brother sailors will be plenty enough, for you to understand that the nice thing to do is avoid cutting up their dinghies with your upturned prop. No signs, rules, or laws would be needed, any more than signs, rules or laws are needed to keep people from letting their shopping carts roll downhills through the supermarket parking lot into other people's car doors.
__________________
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 10:06   #36
Registered User
 
fishwife's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South coast of England, moving around a bit.
Boat: Long range motor cruiser
Posts: 750
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
I'm probably older than you.

I've read dozens of boating books and I have participated in several boating forums. Nowhere have I seen this posted except here.

When considered in the context of possibly damaging another boat, it makes sense, but when considered in the context of keeping the motor out of the water when not in use to prevent marine growth, leaving it up makes sense. That is what many boaters have learned from reading their motor's owners manuals or listening to advice from other boaters.

I just think you're going to have a very difficult time convincing strangers that you know best and that they should follow your rules. I am not saying that you are wrong, just that if you expect everyone you meet in life to see things your way, you are going to be very disappointed.

Perhaps signs should be posted.
Perhaps you don't appreciate the difference between rules, laws and etiquette. We all expect to be treated in a mannerly way but there is no rule or law to require many aspects of civilized behavior. Leaving your engine tilted is either ignorance of the consequences or a total disregard of others property. Fortunately most yachting people are prepared to learn from others wiser than themselves.

P.
__________________
The message is the journey, we are sure the answer lies in the destination. But in reality, there is no station, no place to arrive at once and for all. The joy of life is the trip, and the station is a dream that constantly out distances us”. Robert Hastings, The Station
fishwife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 10:13   #37
cruiser

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Charleston, SC
Boat: Camano Troll
Posts: 4,669
Obviously, this discussion is going nowhere.

If you tell someone he is doing something wrong, especially in a public place, he may thank you for your advice and do it your way. He may just ignore you. He may tell you to F##k off, or he may escallate the situation into a fist fight.

Just keep that in mind the next time you assume the role of the "Dock Police".
__________________
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 10:27   #38
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,737
Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Dockhead:
HyLyte’s method doesn’t force others to stumble across multiple rafted dinks, to get to the dock & back.
It’s not, at all, too much trouble, to be courteous to others, and appropriately share a scarce resource, like a “taxi stand” dock.
Yes, I appreciated that. It's very clever indeed; I admired it.

Sure a lot of trouble, though. I tend to find a bit of beach to run up on when the dinghy docks are that crowded. Over here in many places you can also call a water taxi for 1 quid a head, for a truly low-impact approach to ferrying ashore.
__________________
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 10:45   #39
Registered User
 
Reckless's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Windsor, Ontario Canada
Boat: Edel 665 23' - Reckless
Posts: 84
Obviously a touch subject every time etiquette is mentioned.

In the cruising world with so many people coming from so many places, there aren't always "rules" that are universal. We all learn from different sources be it books, or talking to other sailors. I do both, I enjoy reading technical material and true life stories of those out there cruising. I have talked to industry professionals, and old salts while sitting at a bar. I try and take as much information in as possible, and yes that information can vary from one to another.

Common sense to one isn't always the same as the common sense of another.

One can argue that if you tie up beside a dingy that has it's motor up you are to blame if that outboard puts a hole in your boat. Tie up where there aren't any dangers like and tilted up outboard. Just playing devils advocate. Relax, don't feed me to the wolves.

Debate can be made on both accounts pro's and con's of both leaving the motor tilted or down.

I personally have only used a dink a few times as it really isn't needed where I sail. However on the occasions I used it we left the motor down. And agree that leaving a motor down at the dingy dock is a good practice, this was made by me, based on the information I have heard. However
when I bought my outboard I was told to always tilt it out of the water when it wasn't in use. ALWAYS. This was by a person who has been boating for over 40 years, owned a marnia and shop for 30 years.


How someone approaches a situation,

remember we are sometimes visiting places where laws, and responses to questioning someones actions can be very different from what we are used to.

I am sure we have all heard about disputes that escalate from verbal to physical to someone getting shot or stabbed. Just happened last weekend in my town. Dispute over a 12 pack of beer lead to a drunk guy grabbing a machete and holding 4 people hostage until they gave him the 12 pack they owed him.

Point is you never know how someone will react. I have meet a few people in my day that would not hesitate to sink you right beside your dingy if they caught you slashing theirs for leaving your motor up.

I think as a society we need to learn how to approach issues civilly, without anger.

I would never consider slashing someone elses boat in anger, it is just a juvenile approach to life.
__________________
Reckless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 10:57   #40
cruiser

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Charleston, SC
Boat: Camano Troll
Posts: 4,669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckless View Post
Obviously a touch subject every time etiquette is mentioned.

In the cruising world with so many people coming from so many places, there aren't always "rules" that are universal. We all learn from different sources be it books, or talking to other sailors. I do both, I enjoy reading technical material and true life stories of those out there cruising. I have talked to industry professionals, and old salts while sitting at a bar. I try and take as much information in as possible, and yes that information can vary from one to another.

Common sense to one isn't always the same as the common sense of another.

One can argue that if you tie up beside a dingy that has it's motor up you are to blame if that outboard puts a hole in your boat. Tie up where there aren't any dangers like and tilted up outboard. Just playing devils advocate. Relax, don't feed me to the wolves.

Debate can be made on both accounts pro's and con's of both leaving the motor tilted or down.

I personally have only used a dink a few times as it really isn't needed where I sail. However on the occasions I used it we left the motor down. And agree that leaving a motor down at the dingy dock is a good practice, this was made by me, based on the information I have heard. However
when I bought my outboard I was told to always tilt it out of the water when it wasn't in use. ALWAYS. This was by a person who has been boating for over 40 years, owned a marnia and shop for 30 years.


How someone approaches a situation,

remember we are sometimes visiting places where laws, and responses to questioning someones actions can be very different from what we are used to.

I am sure we have all heard about disputes that escalate from verbal to physical to someone getting shot or stabbed. Just happened last weekend in my town. Dispute over a 12 pack of beer lead to a drunk guy grabbing a machete and holding 4 people hostage until they gave him the 12 pack they owed him.

Point is you never know how someone will react. I have meet a few people in my day that would not hesitate to sink you right beside your dingy if they caught you slashing theirs for leaving your motor up.

I think as a society we need to learn how to approach issues civilly, without anger.

I would never consider slashing someone elses boat in anger, it is just a juvenile approach to life.
Thank you for an intelligent, reasoned post.
__________________
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 11:09   #41
Moderator... short for Cat Wrangler
 
sarafina's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: San Francisco
Boat: Cal 28 Flush Deck
Posts: 5,559
Images: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
Obviously, this discussion is going nowhere.

Just keep that in mind the next time you assume the role of the "Dock Police".
Ok, everyone gets your opinion that no one should expect anyone to behave well. Nor should they try to enforce good behavior at their dingy dock.

This thread however is ABOUT custom and manners, not rules and posted signs.

Clearly the custom of leaving an outboard down is common.

The possibility of some dope leaving it up also exists, but that's not what the op was asking about. They want to know how to do it so they DON'T piss other people off.

An excellent endeavor in any forum.
__________________
Sara

ain't what ya do, it's the way that ya do it...
sarafina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 11:26   #42
Registered User
 
fishwife's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South coast of England, moving around a bit.
Boat: Long range motor cruiser
Posts: 750
To what Sara has to say.

P.
__________________
The message is the journey, we are sure the answer lies in the destination. But in reality, there is no station, no place to arrive at once and for all. The joy of life is the trip, and the station is a dream that constantly out distances us”. Robert Hastings, The Station
fishwife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 12:00   #43
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post

If you tell someone he is doing something wrong, especially in a public place He may tell you to F##k off,

Just keep that in mind the next time you assume the role of the "Dock Police".

Actually its no problem as the vast vast majority of the cruising community know the right thing to do. Its one thing about the cruisers in general: Its a dickhead seive and those dickheads are left back at home.

Cruisiers really are the best folks around and educating those that are new and havent heard the best methods are no problem either because most are very diligent in learning

Ain't seen no dock police neither. They would be held in that same sieve


Mark
__________________
Notes on a Circumnavigation.
OurLifeAtSea.com

Somalia Pirates and our Convoy
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 12:46   #44
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,308
heck I mostly even forget that my dingy motor will tip up

worried about growth - be real! If you plan to be tired up that long you need to think of some better storage arrangement!
__________________
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2010, 13:00   #45
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Napa CA USA
Boat: Piver Victress
Posts: 87
Regarding dinghy dock ettiquette in leaving motors up ( so they slash other people's dinghies ) ... I have a hard dinghy not an inflatable & I row ( no outboard to gouge my neigbours ) ..... however I do get annoyed when I cant get my dinghy to the dock because everyone has tied theirs up too short .... grrrrrr
__________________

__________________
svtadpole is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dock

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can a Rigid Dinghy Be Made 'Self-Bailing' when Left Moored to the Dock ? David_Old_Jersey Auxiliary Equipment & Dinghy 19 04-03-2013 07:56
Flag Etiquette Alan Wheeler Rules of the Road, Regulations & Red Tape 0 24-02-2008 01:46
Dinghy etiquette mkulla General Sailing Forum 9 17-01-2006 10:04
Dock hanger for Walker Bay dinghy David W General Sailing Forum 3 11-05-2005 16:55



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:08.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.