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Old 06-01-2014, 11:31   #16
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Re: coming into slip question

Use a mid-spring. run one from mid-clamp or if you don't have one, from the base of your mast wires. as you come around, drop the loop of the spring over the clamp on the finger or around the lie, keeping the other end aft in the cockpit. Now you can sail around the spring into the slip without having to worry about hitting the other boat. ''If you keep the spring line tight and leave the engine in forward, your boat will sit there until you run out of gas.

You can see how this is done, by buying Jack Klange's single-handed docking video from the Sailing Channel. Costs about 15 bucks and is well worth it.
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Old 06-01-2014, 12:19   #17
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Re: coming into slip question

Hmm--I've only had boats with really big (wide) rudders. I feel little walk and can use the wash against the rudder to move the stern around. Lots of times I've seen guys struggle. I've never taken the helm of a newer boat (with much smaller rudder) while docking so I've never been able to see if my theory is correct. Something else about my boat may explain this. I've got a very big/long keel too. She predates (1954) the age when designers went to smaller and more efficient/faster bottoms.
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Old 06-01-2014, 13:15   #18
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Re: coming into slip question

dnimigon,

Backing down past your berth, then forwarding in may be your best bet. If you back down just to your berth, the combination of breeze and current will set your bow down onto your neighbor, followed by the rest of the boat.

If you can get a line over the outermost cleat on your dock (I'm hoping you have cleats rather than rings), led to your amidships cleat on deck, leaving the engine going in gear, ahead dead slow, you can use the line for "the brakes", motoring against it, having left the helm turned so the boat "wants" to turn into the dock, the engine and line will hold you there, tight to the dock. Then you can set your bow and stern lines.

It is important to be prepared when you enter the marina, fenders out, lines ready, to be sure the bow and stern lines are led properly, and the tails placed so that you can take them up and secure them. Later, once the boat is secure in the slip, turn off the engine. The moment you take it out of gear, the current will grab the boat. I learned that the hard way, quite a surprised gal I was, too!

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Old 06-01-2014, 13:29   #19
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Re: coming into slip question

Quote:
Originally Posted by dnimigon View Post
When coming in very slow prop wash wants to take me to port.
Just to make sure we are all discussing the same thing.... Do you really mean prop wash, or did you mean prop walk?

Specifically, is the problem that you pull into the slip fine, but when you try to stop the boat, you drop it in reverse and the prop walk combined with the wind and current push you into the other boat?

Or is the problem when you try to make the turn into your slip in forward the prop wash pushes out stern to port and you hit the boat next to you while still pulling in?
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Old 06-01-2014, 13:48   #20
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Originally Posted by jackdale View Post

I back down slips regularly. reverse, neutral ; reverse, neutral ; reverse, neutral etc.

Face backwards while reversing down, but take quick glimpses at your bow.
+1. If prop is not moving then there is no prop walk. On a mono you dont need a rotating prop to have steerage, just a little (about 1.5 knots) sternway. Get boat moving backwards fast enough to have streerage and then play thrust/transmission as needed.

I used to put a charter boat back in its slip at the end of a long channel (about 50 yards) on a regular basis this way. Slip was to port if backing down the channel. So when stern was at finger pier of previous slip I would drop her into idle reverse and the prop walk would walk her right into the slip. I could literally lock the wheel and she would walk right in without steering. Used to use that to demostrate using prop walk to your advantage to students.

Sounds similar to OPs situation.

I used to watch others come down the channel bow first and, without spring lines and a lot of effort, there was no way they were getting into that slip. Charter base staff would help them with springs/dinghys/etc to get them in.
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Old 06-01-2014, 14:10   #21
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Re: coming into slip question

Run a line from the portside piling diagonally across the bow to the pier to guide your boat away from your neighbor's boat. Just tight enough to keep the line out of the water and not let your boat hit/drift into his boat. The line doesn't have to be guitar string tight, so it won't rub on your boat while tied up in slip. You'll need to experiment to get the right tension. Pretty soon, you won't need it as you gain confidence in getting into that slip.
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Old 06-01-2014, 14:25   #22
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Re: coming into slip question

Driving in the whole way backward is really easy. You can see better and its just like pulling into a parking spot with a car.

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Old 06-01-2014, 14:45   #23
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Re: coming into slip question

Having the rudder "at the front" makes handling in reverse the same as driving a car forward with steering in the front. So imagine driving through a mall parking lot in reverse. Would be really hard to get into a parking space. You need to position the rear wheels in just the right place, time the turn at just the right time with just the right amount of turn, then LOOK OUT!!! Because the front end is swinging into the cars on the other side. No one would do that but that is exactly the problems we face driving a boat into harbour.
Going in backwards solves this i think.

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Old 06-01-2014, 15:14   #24
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Re: coming into slip question

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Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post

Other then that , go slow , fender up your port side and let her sit on next doors boat and then get across to the finger by hand.
Alternatively drop someone off elsewhere to help you warp the boat round the finger into your berth
It's hard to have too many fenders.



Multiple mid-ship cleats are handy too.
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Old 06-01-2014, 17:49   #25
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Never come in straight. You should come in from the left maybe 20 degrees depending on the wind. When you reverse it should pull the momentum out of the boat and pull it in straight.
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Old 06-01-2014, 18:04   #26
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Re: coming into slip question

If you think your Catalina 30 is tough to steer try a bigger fixed keel that displaces double or triple that amount. I haven't read all the replies but in general:

- Request a different slip. Some slips are just harder to get into than others no matter how you slice it. No need to make your life harder than it is. Good pool players can make tough shots, but in general they make easy shots, because they set up their shots in advance.

- Time with the tide. If you get screwed up it's a lot better to be screwed up at slack water, or at least not at full current.

- Radio ahead and ask someone to be on the other boat, the dock, or both. If you ask the other boat, "Do you mind when I come in if I have a friend on there with a boat pole, wearing boat shoes to make sure we don't hit you" he'll probably give you a big smile and say "yes, please." The marina has in their contract that they can board the other boat for help so they don't need to ask.

- Starboard side ties are crap and the minute you hit reverse (to slow down) your stern will swing out towards your (port side) neighbor.

- Give some thought to which mooring line to toss out first. Either way you're going twist a bit, either bow to port or stern out to port.

- Have someone on the dock, get the lines out, make sure you've arrested forward progress, make sure no one is tugging like a dummy and making your life harder than it needs to be, and then be on that port side with a boat pole and/or fender.

No one is handing out trophies for perfect landings and all that matters is you don't hurt your boat, your neighbor's boat, and anyone involved. Use fenders and boat poles. The occasional bounce off other boats slowly with fenders at a reasonable speed is fine. Even less bad on the ego and gelcoat is pushing off it with a boat pole (aim for standing rigging, not brightwork or loosely mounted features).

They don't build marinas to make it easy for you to get in and out, and the first availability is always for the worst access slips. The better ones already have wait lists.
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Old 06-01-2014, 18:28   #27
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Re: coming into slip question

We have a 58 foot 36 ton boat with 16 beam and 17 wide slip. The hardest thing to learn was to figure out how nature could help us rather than fight us. Always better to enter into the wind and current. Can you set up a turn, drift past the slip while rotating, preferably in neutral and then power back upwind, up-current. We do this and other tactics depending on wind speed & direction. Some breezes require backing. One thing for sure with our mass and single screw - you can't fight it. USE THE FORCE LUKE.
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Old 06-01-2014, 19:49   #28
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Re: coming into slip question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor Doug View Post
Never come in straight. You should come in from the left maybe 20 degrees depending on the wind. When you reverse it should pull the momentum out of the boat and pull it in straight.
The OP reported he has a right handed prop so when reversing the prop walk will move the stern to port. In his case this is the opposite of what he needs since his dock is to stbd and there's another boat docked close to port.
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