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Old 15-02-2018, 03:11   #1
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check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arrival

Hey,

I'm putting together a little check list to not forget anything. Do you see important things missing?

BEFORE LEAVING

Show crew safety equipment, how to wear life jacket, OXO knots
Explain crew expected action when leaving
Check tide level, and current
Check Weather and current wind direction
Turn switch to 2 batteries
Start engine
Put the tiller in sailing position
Test Engine Forward / Reverse
Check the Bilge Area
Close the Bildge pump sea cock to avoid water intake (Currently no anti return valve)
Close the front Hatch
Remove the Main Sail Cover
Setup the route on GPS
Switch on the depth sounder
Open VHF Radio
Log on to marine coast guard

ARRIVING AT ANCHORAGE

Anchor at no more than 4 m depth low tide (If possible)
Setup the anchor alarm and take reference points
Put the anchor chain blocking screw (That avoid the chain to get out of the rail)
Set the main sail cover
Secure the furling sail to avoid any unexpected unrolling
Put the tiller in anchor position and fasten so that it is not affected by the waves
Remove the sheet from main sheet
Switch on anchor light
Turn off engine
Put battery switch to House battery only
Log off to marine safe guard

IF STRONG STORM COMING UNDER ANCHORAGE

Check expected wind condition, move the boat to most sheltered area.
Drop maximum lenght of chain as possible
Setup the second and heavier anchor with maximum of chain as possible in “V”
Put the anchor chain blocking screw (That avoid the chain to get out of the rail)
Secure the main sail by extra fastener
Secure all objects in the boat
Pack the dinghy and store inside
Put the dinghy outboard on the rail
Open Bilge sea cock, close unecessary sea cocks
Close hatches
Check the anchor alarm
Switch on the VHF
Have the headlight actually on the head
Wear good clothes, life jacket and harness
Ask crew to wear life jacket too
Explain expected actions from each of them if Anchor drag
Start Engine

ON ARRIVAL

Switch on Engine
Check that crews remember remember the OXO knot
Explain expected action from each crew
Roll the furling sail
Drop and secure main sail
Setup mooring line
Setup the fenders
Check the wind direction, tide level, and expected current
Switch on depth sounder
Enter channel

AFTER ARRIVING

Switch off engine
Switch off all equipments
Turn battery switch to no current position
Log Off to Marine Coast Guard
Close Hatch
Put the sail cover
Secure the sail cover
Secure Furling Sail
Secure all running Rigging
Empty the Ice box
Close all Sea Cocks Except Engine and bilge
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Old 15-02-2018, 12:41   #2
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

I will say everyone's checklist is probably a little different and it also depends on the sailing you plan to do (day, coastal, cruising, offshore, racing, fun). Best to go thru the checklist every time (by actually checking off each box) and then see what you need to add over time. I once forgot to unhook the AC power from the dock and wondered what was trying to yank my stanchion on the deck....might want to add that one or 'untie all dock lines' too (tho I've never made that mistake, which would have been a less expensive fix, actually). Maybe you should check engine fluid (oil, transmission, fuel) levels. Just a couple examples
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Old 15-02-2018, 16:15   #3
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

@gamayun,

I forgot to untie a spring line once, bent that stanchion right over! Did the power cord trick car camping. Amazine how skinny you can make an orange extension cord!

@krisko,

We do things a little differently, in that we leave seacocks open, and our cockpit drains naturally, don't have to open them, there are no valves. The point is to leave the boat so it can leave at a moment's notice. I think that is important wherever you anchor, but in places that are tide rode, like Tangalooma, I think it is even more important, because at each tidal change, there is the possibility of the chain wrapping round the stock of the anchor, and pulling it out.

Your checklists will evolve as all the crew become more proficient.

Ann
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Old 16-02-2018, 03:53   #4
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPA Cate View Post
@gamayun,
in that we leave seacocks open, and our cockpit drains naturally, don't have to open them, there are no valves. The point is to leave the boat so it can leave at a moment's notice
I suppose you let the "necessary" seacock open but close the other ones ?

In my check list, I close all sea cocks except the engine. The idea is to minimise the risk to sink because of the head pipes that disconnect from the sea cock... but still being able to leave in case of trouble...
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Old 16-02-2018, 05:56   #5
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

Check the bilge area and the engine first thing. Problems there will need to be resolved or you won't be getting underway.
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Old 16-02-2018, 07:04   #6
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

Quote:
Originally Posted by kriskro View Post
Turn switch to 2 batteries
Start engine

AFTER ARRIVING

Switch off engine
Switch off all equipments
Turn battery switch to no current position
1) Do you mean Battery #2, or BOTH batteries. IF both, why are you running off of both batteries?

2) Are your bilge pumps wired directly to the batteries? Will they still run if batteries are turned off?
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Old 16-02-2018, 07:49   #7
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pirate Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

WOW..!!!
I have a simple in comparison check/routine for all occasions.
Leaving dock..
Unplug mains and stow.
Undo springs, set fore and aft lines for quick release.
Start engine and check water flow at exhaust.
Lift engine cover to check for possible leaks and belts okay.. sounds good.
VHF, Nav and all other things for use switched on.
Cast of bow, cast of stern and go.
If there's a wind blowing me off I rig a mid-ships dock line to keep me in place while letting go fore and aft.

Anchoring/Mooring
Set up anchor and check chain is free to run in locker.
Furl/drop genoa/jib
Start engine and check exhaust.
Circle anchorage to check available room, currents and wind for best location.
Approach chosen spot wind on beam (if boats are lying to wind) with decent escape hole, then turn head to wind, switch to neutral and bring main sheet traveller central.. centre helm and as boat decelerates release main sheet and go forward and drop the hook + 10 metres.. wait till chain starts to straighten as she falls off then release 10 more.. hold till bow swings head to wind.. release 10 more.. when boat is head to wind again take rough bearings a couple of turns of chain to a cleat, go aft and put kettle on.. take down main while kettle boils.. make coffee.. go forward check all is well, fit snubber and chainstop.. return to cockpit, switch off engine and instruments, drink coffee.

Arriving Dock
Hang fenders both sides and arrange lines while still in clear water.

Leaving Anchorage
Switch on all needed instruments.
Check best side to fall off for clearing anchorage.
Start engine and check exhaust and engine.
Raise main.. centre mainsheet and tighten.. centre helm.
While boat tacks slowly up go forward and release chainstop, haul in and remove snubber.
As boat swings bow to wind again and starts on opposite tack start hauling in chain till tension comes back on at top of tack.. lock and hold.
When she's fallen off and begins opposite tack haul in again.. repeat procedure as often as needed till 7-10 metres left holding you in place.
Wait till boat starts to tack in the favoured direction for falling off then haul in remaining chain.. boats momentum will aid breaking anchor free.. haul in remainder till stock is just at water level lock off on cleat.
Return to cockpit and take the helm and steer through chosen gap in boats, engage engine if needed..
Clear boats, set AP and go forward to haul in the with luck clean anchor and stow all gear, snubbers etc.

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Old 16-02-2018, 09:05   #8
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

@Kriskro

Thinking back on your previous posts, I commend you for all the thinking you are putting into these things. Thinking and making lists is essential work, but it doesn't take long before you enter the region of diminishing returns.

In real life you do not work off physical lists because when things are going well you don't need them, and when things are going badly you don't have time to mess with them.

So now that you've thought enuff to get things straight in your head, go down to your little boat and:

1) Go through your pre-departure safety check. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist.

2) Go through your sail-raising procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

3) Go through your engine start-up procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

4) Go through your anchor-weighing procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

5) Etc.

6) Etc.

n) Etc.

Now when you've all that IMPRINTED on your mind, you can begin to think about laying a route for your little boat to take twixt Oz and France. You won't learn seamanship from making written lists! Unless the list-making is substitution activity, put it aside and go out and learn to be a sailor. In your boat. On the water!

All the best.

TP
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Old 16-02-2018, 13:55   #9
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrentePieds View Post
@Kriskro

Thinking back on your previous posts, I commend you for all the thinking you are putting into these things. Thinking and making lists is essential work, but it doesn't take long before you enter the region of diminishing returns.

In real life you do not work off physical lists because when things are going well you don't need them, and when things are going badly you don't have time to mess with them.

So now that you've thought enuff to get things straight in your head, go down to your little boat and:

1) Go through your pre-departure safety check. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist.

2) Go through your sail-raising procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

3) Go through your engine start-up procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

4) Go through your anchor-weighing procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

5) Etc.

6) Etc.

n) Etc.

Now when you've all that IMPRINTED on your mind, you can begin to think about laying a route for your little boat to take twixt Oz and France. You won't learn seamanship from making written lists! Unless the list-making is substitution activity, put it aside and go out and learn to be a sailor. In your boat. On the water!

All the best.

TP
Hi TP, I agree with you completely on the need to train yourself for the various procedures. I also agree that one can over do it and enter the diminishing returns zone. I further agree that seaman ship is much more than written lists.

I would only add that written lists, if done properly, are important and in some emergencies they are very important. When things are going well, lists can keep them going well. In emergencies one often (not always, but often) does have time to use them, and sometimes a list can mitigate the results of the emergency.

I am nowhere as experienced a pilot as many on this forum, but I can tell you that even the most experienced pilots use written check lists to keep things going well. Likewise, a sailor can benefit from a checklist, in particular if the trip is an extended one. There are many components to a journey, and it is easy to forget one or more items. History is full of people who have forgotten something, only to lament it's loss later.

Likewise, a checklist can be very valuable in an emergency. Again, pilots use them even in emergencies. In our case, they can benefit one who is not as experienced as you or one who is not familiar with the vessel. In cases where you are not single handing the yacht, a crewman can read the checklist, thus providing a confirmation that all is being done correctly. Even in the case of a knock down resulting in catastrophic damage, the vessel may not sink immediately. A checklist can provide some measure of safety while overcoming confusion from surprise, injury, etc. It may even prompt you to do things or grab things that will make your life easier, such as documents, safety equipment, etc. It can also prevent the duplication of effort, and in effect gaining valuable time.

As I initially stated, I agree that one should be prepared so that in bad conditions the reaction is almost instinctive. I also think that one should not underestimate the value of a written checklist, both for training and for execution.
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Old 16-02-2018, 15:13   #10
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

Back in the days of my Air Force Flying, we had procedural checklists that covered specific activities, ie start up , pre take off, pre landing , shutdown etc, and it was SOP for the checklist to be read with a response required before moving to the next item.

Then there were DVAs or Drills and Vital Actions, which one knew and implemented because they had become second nature - includes reaction in an emergency.

Frankly written checklists on a yacht may be necessary before closing down a boat and leaving it, because a missed item like not closing a sea cock or shutting off gas etc could cause a major incident.

Most of the activities one does should become second nature to the owner of any boat, because it comes under the good practice of seamanship and common sense.

I note that Cooking gas didn't get a mention.
Good practice is that bottled gas is kept in a separate self draining locker and the gas is always turned off at the bottle when the stove is not in use. I made a practice of turning off at the bottle, let the gas line clear with the flame going out, then turn off the gas at the stove.

Anyone who has witnessed or seen the aftermath of a gas explosion on a boat, doesn't take bottled gas for granted.

Never leave a stove with a burning element unattended - if something causes the flame to go out the gas is still coming through the line and will form a dangerous explosive mix in the bilges.

A bilge pump, preferably non electric can pump accumulated flammable gas from the bilges. This should become a routine practice.
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Old 16-02-2018, 15:54   #11
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

All good lists and each one is individual. Mine start with gas and end with gas, I also have a red laminated sign that goes on the outside of the gas locker. I am paranoid about gas having seen the remains of a gas exploded yacht.

I have more lists for leaving than arriving as I have to row back or get a water taxi to my berth. I have check lists for at anchor, engine start. marina, abroad, arrival, departure, they are all in a flip book. I know them by heart but I dont have any for actually sailing, that's in my heart.
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Old 16-02-2018, 16:48   #12
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

Great thread!

I also believe checklists are essential: for the skipper/owner but also for crew that's new to the boat.

Drilling them ad nauseum has its limits, too. Sometimes the procedure has to change for a good reason. Or you sail a different boat or even buy a new boat!?

Checklists give everyone peace of mind. From my own experience, there were too many times I forgot to close the raw water inlet when leaving the boat or the gas valve was left open.
This is usually no big deal until or unless Murphy visits you.

Now I sometimes check things a second time before leaving because I don't do them in the same order every time. Also annoying...

So a printed/laminated checklist makes a lot of sense. Or one on the computer/phone/tablet to tick things off.
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Old 16-02-2018, 17:28   #13
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

I wrote a checklist many years ago for our boat, this one, our third. I never made ones for our 22 or 25 footers. I used it once a few months later, to edit it once. I have owned this boat for 20 years now. I have not used the checklist once since the edit.

It's not a bad thing to think about and write down.

But sailboats are NOT airplanes. Most boats lack the complexity of planes.

I find the majority of my "effort" is in figuring out the least complicated way to perform tasks. As a singlehanded sailor I just hate going forward, back to the cockpit and then back forward again, 'cuz I forgot to bring the chain stopper the first time, for example. And when with crew, I share with them the time saving tips & tricks to reduce effort.

A checklist, while helpful, also, then, needs to be in the right order.
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Old 16-02-2018, 20:07   #14
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrentePieds View Post
@Kriskro

Thinking back on your previous posts, I commend you for all the thinking you are putting into these things. Thinking and making lists is essential work, but it doesn't take long before you enter the region of diminishing returns.

In real life you do not work off physical lists because when things are going well you don't need them, and when things are going badly you don't have time to mess with them.

So now that you've thought enuff to get things straight in your head, go down to your little boat and:

1) Go through your pre-departure safety check. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist.

2) Go through your sail-raising procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

3) Go through your engine start-up procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

4) Go through your anchor-weighing procedure. Then do it again. And again. Two dozen times. Or whatever it takes to get the routine IMPRINTED on your mind so you'll never have to use a physical checklist. You should be able to do the procedure perfectly. With one hand tied behind your back. In the dark. With green water sweeping over your deck.

5) Etc.

6) Etc.

n) Etc.

Now when you've all that IMPRINTED on your mind, you can begin to think about laying a route for your little boat to take twixt Oz and France. You won't learn seamanship from making written lists! Unless the list-making is substitution activity, put it aside and go out and learn to be a sailor. In your boat. On the water!

All the best.

TP
This remembering stuff works so great...until around 50 years of age!
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Old 16-02-2018, 22:00   #15
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Re: check lists before leaving, on anchorage, before storm at anchorage and on arriva

Oh, damn, Gamayun - I shoulda remembered that. Thirty years ago ;-)

While I have you - thanks for what you said on that long, long snarly thread about personal conduct :-)!

TP
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