Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 25-11-2015, 22:27   #16
CF Adviser
 
Pelagic's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Boat: Van Helleman Schooner 65ft StarGazer
Posts: 6,895
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Yes, I really like it.....I am 48 tons which is why I ask, since I will be in those waters next year
__________________

__________________
Pelagic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2015, 22:51   #17
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,461
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Here's a pic of Insatiable II slipped in Port Cygnet, Tasmania some years ago. Hung out a LONG way on both ends of the carriage, but she balanced perfectly on her keel (fore and aft). The builder had said she would, but this was the first time on a slip for us, and I was a bit antsy!

Jim
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	scan0004.jpg
Views:	112
Size:	388.3 KB
ID:	113841  
__________________

__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2015, 23:02   #18
CF Adviser
 
Pelagic's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Boat: Van Helleman Schooner 65ft StarGazer
Posts: 6,895
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Yes Jim, my diciest haul outs have been with railway slips.

On the bigger yachts, you have a limited time period to set the blocks properly as the tide gets near high....then if they get it wrong!!! ....the panic to get her off the blocks as the tide goes out.

My worst experience was Cairns Slipway where it took 4 night tries to get me up on the hard using their railway.

Next time....I used their graving dock.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1448517758795.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	76.8 KB
ID:	113842  
__________________
Pelagic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 05:57   #19
Registered User
 
CaptTom's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Southern Maine
Boat: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Posts: 979
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

I've always heard them called "marine railways". I hadn't heard this use for the term "slipways". I would have assumed that meant the same as "ways"; a place where boats are launched by sliding them down into the water on an incline. Rails or not.

Our marina has a railway that's used all the time. We haul boats directly into a heated indoor boathouse to allow owners to work on them out of the weather. Very popular with fishermen who can't afford to wait for good weather. Maybe in places with more frequent good weather this isn't an issue.

As for regular hauling and launching for storage, we have a large boat trailer with hydraulic support pads that's hauled by a big front-end loader. The boats are packed VERY tightly in the yard using this. Inches apart, with pulpits and even flared bows overhanging the surrounding boats. You could never do this with a travel lift.
__________________
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 06:06   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Elmvale, Ontario
Boat: Ontario32
Posts: 160
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

The Trent-Severn Waterway between Lake Ontario and Georgian Bay has a really nice piece ot marine railway engineering at Big Chute. The ekevation change is about 100 feet, The macinery can handle plus 60 tons and the vessels being handled be it a keel boat or otherwise remain horizontal. A really interesting experience.
__________________
Crew of Turning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 08:52   #21
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,105
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Slipways. Watch your boat slip away into untold expenses.
__________________
reed1v is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 08:53   #22
Registered User
 
rolandcavanagh's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Jamestown, RI
Boat: Grand banks 32' Classic
Posts: 69
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Clark Boat Yard in Jamestown, Rhode Island uses one with a really old drive mechanism to haul it up the rails, but once up, the hydraulic trailer allows them to pack the boats in far tighter than possible with a travellift. I'll look for pictures of Fairweather on the railway and post them.


Sent from my iPad using Cruisers Sailing Forum
__________________
rolandcavanagh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 10:02   #23
Registered User
 
rolandcavanagh's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Jamestown, RI
Boat: Grand banks 32' Classic
Posts: 69
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Launching Fairweather on the railway. The flat part with all the red steel structure rolls down the rails with the hydraulic squeeze trailer and boat on board. They can also crib a boat without the squeeze trailer.









__________________
rolandcavanagh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 10:31   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 107
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

There were some marine railways in Vallejo Ca, they were abandoned. Would have been used for hauling small boats.
Large vessels are hauled out using drydocks.
We used one in West Seattle in 1982 for 625' vessel.
Very simple, float the vessel into the dock. Close the watertight door. Have divers go beneath the vessel and place shoring blocks. Appeared to be douglas fir, then gradually pump out the water The block placement was very precision, probably not 2 inches margin of error.
The final postion of the vessel was performed using well placed come-a-longs and muscle.
Was about a 4 hour operation once organized.
Floating drydocks are especially useful in emergencies.
There was one at Subic Bay in the Philippines made from concrete during WW2. Still in use in 1978.
__________________
oleman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 10:53   #25
Registered User
 
redhead's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: PNW 48.59'45N 122.45'50W
Boat: Ian Ross design ketch 63'
Posts: 764
Images: 5
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Marine railway. We were just hauled by one in WA. Prior to the haul I was chasing around stowing everything in sight that might go flying. When they finally hauled us it was the most gentle movement imaginable. I don't think it was more than 3 or 4 degrees off level at any time. Very manpower intensive as there were 4 of us on deck as the haul began and 2 on land to chock it and level it as it came up. I don't know if this is typical or the guys at Walsh Marine are exceptional, but they took our 40 tons out of the water like a ballet.
__________________
redhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 11:18   #26
Registered User
 
Cadence's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: SC
Boat: None,build the one shown of glass, had many from 6' to 48'.
Posts: 6,063
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Quote:
Originally Posted by grantmc View Post
You still see them occasionally: a short section of railway line used for hauling boats up and out of the water. One end of course is in the water and at the other end will be a powerful winch.

Just wondering what these facilities are called? Is there some special maritime term?

(And yes I have spent some time looking on google with no joy obviously.)

Here’s a link to a wonderful little video of a manual haul out line at offcenterharbor.com if you’re not sure what I’m talking about.
Railway! The norm. years ago prior the travel lifts. Still in use today for wide beams or heavy boats. I would prefer a rail since the length of the keel can be supported. They are probably getting harder to find. The big advantage of a travel lift, on tires. is the mobility. Rails are great for in and outs. A big travel lift is a major investment along with the finger piers to run them out on.
__________________
Cadence is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 11:26   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 29
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

If you mentioned the term WAYS anywhere near a yard they would know exactly what you were referring to..Don in Friday Harbor
__________________
dagranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 11:38   #28
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 77
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Here in Ireland, and in the UK, they are called "Patent Slips", at least that was what what they were called 100 or so years ago when they first started to be used in boatbuilding yards. There are two boatyards in Oldcourt, near Skibbereen, County Cork, where I have frequently seen large fishing vessels, 80 feet or more, hauled out for routine maintenance. There is a disused one right in the centre of Baltimore village, not too far from Oldcourt. You can see all these on Google Maps, sattelite view.
Those ramps which slope down into the water for launching small boats we call slipways, or slips, for short. Note, we do not "slip" a boat we launch it. If there is a lot of green weed on the slipway at low water, we need to watch our step, or we might slip .
A further difference in boating language on this side of the pond is that in marinas we tie our boats to pontoons, a dock being an area of water enclosed by walls and accessed by lock gates, where vessels can stay afloat while the tide is out, also called a basin. If you look at a map of Liverpool or London,for instance you can see a number of these.
__________________
SpiritofGlenans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 11:41   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 77
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cadence View Post
Railway! The norm. years ago prior the travel lifts. Still in use today for wide beams or heavy boats. I would prefer a rail since the length of the keel can be supported. They are probably getting harder to find. The big advantage of a travel lift, on tires. is the mobility. Rails are great for in and outs. A big travel lift is a major investment along with the finger piers to run them out on.
"Finger piers"; In these parts we call that arrangement a "lifting dock".
__________________
SpiritofGlenans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-11-2015, 11:59   #30
Registered User
 
Cadence's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: SC
Boat: None,build the one shown of glass, had many from 6' to 48'.
Posts: 6,063
Re: Boat Haul Out Using Railway Line - What are they called?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiritofGlenans View Post
"Finger piers"; In these parts we call that arrangement a "lifting dock".
I'll buy that. Still not cheap regardless of what we call it. Unfortunately I think the intermediate guy is being edged out. Trailer sailor and mega sailor are fine The poor guy in the middle is getting screwed. Maybe not unjustly. Business is business.
__________________

__________________
Cadence is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cal, haul out

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Noose looking knot for a spring line - what is it called? Bowhaus Anchoring & Mooring 17 09-06-2012 20:40
What Are they Called ? Rick Iverson General Sailing Forum 14 26-11-2010 22:02
To haul out, or not to haul out? Ocean Roads Construction, Maintenance & Refit 3 30-04-2009 01:26
Belford Marine Railway - Belford, NJ off-the-grid Marinas 0 24-01-2009 10:22



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:47.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.