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Old 11-08-2009, 20:49   #1
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New to Sailing and to This Site - from NY

Hey guys, my names Andrew and I know I already made a post here but I figured I would introduce myself anyway.

So like I said my name's Andrew, and I currently live in NY. I'm new to sailing and I don't own a sailboat but I definitely plan on owning one in the future. I have a lot to learn but I definitely love sailing. I don't really know how I came to love it but one day I just really liked sailing and then I took a ride on a sailboat and I loved it. So if anybody has any tips or anything like that and want to share them I would appreciate it. And I'm really glad I found this site.

Thanks alot.
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Old 11-08-2009, 23:21   #2
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Hi Andrew and welcome to the CF. Lots of learners here.

One strategy is to check out your community organisations. For example I discovered a while back that the city of Long Beach has dinghy sailing instruction and it's listed in their community news letters. How one gets the job managing the city's fleet of dinghy's is beyond me but what a score that would be - LOL.

Other than that try to get to sailing club or schol that has smaller boats. This is simply a cost issue. You should be able to rent dinghy's, take a dinghy course and get some sailing time for low cost. Taking a course helps you meet people in similar development.

Keel boats are also a way to go - 22 to 27 foot is what I would recommend - but the costs are much higher and the classes tend to be more private. My brother did it this way by joining a sailing club and taking a couple of basic keelboat courses to sharpen his skills as he sailed a lot as a kid.
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:17   #3
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Hey, Thanks. And I would prefer to learn on a 20-25' boat rather than a dinghy but like you said it cost much more. But we'll see. I mean do you recommend taking a dinghy class first rather than a full keel boat?
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:56   #4
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In my opinion you can learn more on a smaller boat as you have to be much more aware of winds and the steering is much touchier.
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Old 12-08-2009, 20:19   #5
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I learned on a 23 foot Ranger. She was responsive enough to teach me sail trim without the dump in the water Have fun and I hope you get out there soon.
Erika
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Old 12-08-2009, 21:23   #6
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Hey, Thanks. And I would prefer to learn on a 20-25' boat rather than a dinghy but like you said it cost much more. But we'll see. I mean do you recommend taking a dinghy class first rather than a full keel boat?
I am with Ocean girl about learning on 22-25 foot boats. A 22 foot keelboat like a catalina is plenty responsive to learn about winds in my opinion.

I recommend at least some time in dinghy's for everyone because it is the only course where you intentionally capsize a boat and learn to right it.

Sometimes on vacations and so forth I will grab a beach cat (hobie or whatever they have) or a dinghy and having the skills in the kit to successfully manage a very small boat in different conditions is helpful.

I had a friend tell me a story about renting a beach cat and spending 3 hours upside down in the water because they didn't know how to sail it and they didn't know how to right it. That can be very frustrating.

The other factor is cost and crew. Anything that gets one out on the water more is good. Dinghys are low cost and no crew. BTW - they can be a hell of a lot of fun as well.
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Old 12-08-2009, 23:51   #7
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Andrew,
Welcome to the 'club'.
I am with the 'club' that has too many sailboats and I am also based on or near Long Island. I have a 19' Lightning racing sailboat that I need to find a home for. It is way faster then any Catalina 22' but is not suitable for over nights. If you have a driveway for it over the winter I could try to show you how to set it up and use it and take you for a couple of sails. Racing rigged with 2 sets of sails (main, jib & spinnaker).
Where on LI are you located? My Lightning is currently near Huntington.
My Tartan 27' is up the Hudson near Nyack, NY and we regularly do the Weds. night races up there.
I forgot to mention that there is a sailing school on City Island that uses Beneteau 21's for their basic keel boat course. I am not affiliated with them but thought they were worth mentioning. Oyster Bay also rents some sail boats and holds some classes. Having said all of that you are probably on the south shore of LI.
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Old 13-08-2009, 07:32   #8
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Andrew,
Welcome to the 'club'.
I am with the 'club' that has too many sailboats and I am also based on or near Long Island. I have a 19' Lightning racing sailboat that I need to find a home for. It is way faster then any Catalina 22' but is not suitable for over nights. If you have a driveway for it over the winter I could try to show you how to set it up and use it and take you for a couple of sails. Racing rigged with 2 sets of sails (main, jib & spinnaker).
Where on LI are you located? My Lightning is currently near Huntington.
My Tartan 27' is up the Hudson near Nyack, NY and we regularly do the Weds. night races up there.
I forgot to mention that there is a sailing school on City Island that uses Beneteau 21's for their basic keel boat course. I am not affiliated with them but thought they were worth mentioning. Oyster Bay also rents some sail boats and holds some classes. Having said all of that you are probably on the south shore of LI.
Hey, thanks for all of the advice guys. And CalebD, thanks but yea unfortunately I do live on the south shore of LI ha ha, sorry. And do you happen to know the name of that sailing school?
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Old 13-08-2009, 13:19   #9
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Andrew,
Here is the link to the place in Oyster Bay: The WaterFront Center of Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York: Sailing Lessons and Boating on the Long Island Sound - Home
Look for the sailing school button.
Here is the link for the sailing school in City Island: New York Sailing Center & Yacht Club: sailing school, club and marina.
I took the basic keelboat course there several years ago.
There are some sailing clubs on the GSB but I can find no commercial schools that operate there. Google: "Great South Bay sailing"
Good luck.
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Old 13-08-2009, 14:31   #10
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You dont really need to spend money on lessons, go to your local yacht club and just ask about. People who own boats are always looking for crew... even if you are inexperienced balast is needed on small keel boats pay attention to the crew and helm doing what they do and you'll pick things up pretty quickly and be more helpful everytime you go out.
Buying the skipper and crew a beer after the race wont hurt either
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Old 13-08-2009, 15:35   #11
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Thanks for the links CalebD, and to Gilbo, I get what your saying about going to the local yacht club but I honestly would feel better if I took a course from a certified instructor. But I will look into what you suggested. Thanks
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Old 14-08-2009, 10:07   #12
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Thanks for the links CalebD, and to Gilbo, I get what your saying about going to the local yacht club but I honestly would feel better if I took a course from a certified instructor. But I will look into what you suggested. Thanks

Gilbo is spot on - you'd be doing some skipper a real favour if you volunteered to act as crew so please do not be put off by your lack of experience - that obviously will grow as time passes.
Most newbies to sailing imagine a yacht club to be a bit stuffy and risk rejection hence the old 'let me get some training under my belt first'. No harm in having the courses completed, but equally no harm in doing them in conjunction with taking a crew spot also. And the sooner you start, the sooner you'll get the experience.
G'wan, go for it - and good luck.
JOHN.
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Old 14-08-2009, 21:18   #13
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Aloha Andrew,
Welcome to the forum of many opinions. Learn to sail on the smallest and cheapest boat possible. Take a basic sailing class. Read the book "Start Sailing Right!" and do volunteer to crew for folks. CalebD made a generous offer that is normally unheard of to a newbie. Too bad the distance is too far.
Regards,
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