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Old 23-06-2013, 21:37   #16
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

And BTW...... Welcome Salty Fox. There's some knowledgeable, affable, great people here. Welcome aboard!
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Old 23-06-2013, 21:46   #17
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

Thanks, Strait Shooter--I'm enjoying myself so far! Still trying to navigate this website, though; I don't want to waste anybody's time by asking questions that have been addressed a hundred times already.

And I'm learning the lingo, too... I figure that I'm always saying the wrong thing, using the wrong term, or whatever. Now if I can just find that glossary...
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Old 23-06-2013, 21:53   #18
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

- Google Search

Here's a link to a custom CF search engine. It works better than the search feature on site

Have fun learning. I read somewhere that you can learn to sail in a few hours and then spend the rest of your life practicing.
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Old 23-06-2013, 22:34   #19
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Salty Fox View Post
You guys really crack me up!
You haven't seen anything yet. Go ahead and tell the audience here what type of anchor you have and watch what happens...
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Old 23-06-2013, 22:56   #20
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

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You haven't seen anything yet. Go ahead and tell the audience here what type of anchor you have and watch what happens...
Um, some kind of metal one, I presume...
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Old 23-06-2013, 23:20   #21
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

Good luck. She's a beautiful boat for sure, but be very careful offshore. Take knowledgeable crew if possible, reef early and often when heavy weather is on the horizon, and have multiple plans (including backtracking a ways to a safe harbor) should anything go wrong. Find a checklist of recommended offshore safety gear, make sure you have all of it and more, and make sure that you know how to use it (practice if possible). Take all advice with a grain of salt, but don't ignore any of it (heck, even if crazy, it might still save your life one day). Always be thinking of what could go wrong (big and small) and what you would do to fix it. Always remember that no matter how well maintained she is, that she's still an 80 year old boat. Learn what kind of anchor she has, and then get two more (and to avoid too much harassment on this forum, have all three be different designs-at least that will make some people happy).

Best of luck, and keep us informed of your progress.
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Old 24-06-2013, 06:52   #22
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Get salty crew to go with you.
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Old 24-06-2013, 07:52   #23
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

Cool looking boat and an adventurous proposition. My advice is just to be aware that things will break and you will need to be able to fix them. Learn the boat's systems. Consider this another phase of your education.
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Old 24-06-2013, 08:01   #24
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

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Get salty crew to go with you.
Actually, an all women crew would be cool when pulling into port.
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Old 24-06-2013, 08:22   #25
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Quote:
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Actually, an all women crew would be cool when pulling into port.
Men can be salty to.
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Old 24-06-2013, 19:17   #26
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

OK, so let me ask another newbie question:
Why can't I just stick to shore while I sail? Why can't I stay less than 5 miles from the shoreline?
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Old 24-06-2013, 20:52   #27
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Not sure of that coastline, but one I am guessing there would be obstacles that close in.
Second and more important. If it becomes a lee shore you will wan
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Old 24-06-2013, 20:54   #28
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Want maneuvering room to not get blown onto it.
What is wrong with taking experienced crew?
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Old 24-06-2013, 21:42   #29
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

Dear Salty Fox

I want to be of assistance to you. I really do. But I'm a professional and I help people in positions similar to yours all the time but they understand the need for solid, professional advice and are willing to pay for it for the simple reason that I've learned a lot in over 40 years of sailing and crusiing and that is valuable.

While I admire boldness and the willingness to be adventurous, I can tell you stories of people who have ended up in awful situations at sea--or in coastal or inland waters because they were foolish and inexperienced. You can learn from your own experience or that of others. It is your choice. However, you just wrote the following:

"Why can't I just stick to shore while I sail? Why can't I stay less than 5 miles from the shoreline?"

Well, the answer is you can, but it would be terribly foolish and dangerous and you cannot always choose to stay close to shore but here is the real reason---BECAUSE....closer to shore is almost always much more dangerous than offshore. The fact that you do not know this and posed this well meaning [insert other adjective here] question on this forum should give other, more experienced cruisers pause to catch their breath. Why would you ever think that somehow staying close to shore is safer than being in bluewater? And as for the West Coast, most of that shoreline is pretty darn challenging and there are relatively few safe havens or inlets when compared to many other coastlines. Apparently you must have been thinking that if the weather gets really bad, you'd be able to just turn toward shore and poke into a river? Well, maybe, but what if there were no river for 100 miles or more? And it's not always easy or advisable to enter a river or inlet in bad weather. And as one person mentioned--what if it were a lee shore? Surely you know what that means-yes? Why do you think the US Navy leaves port and heads to sea when hurricanes are forecasted?

Think of an airplane and airplane safety. Where do most problems occur? Near land of course--there just is not much to hit in the air but they spend almost all of their time way up high and only a tiny portion landing or taking off near airports and other low flying planes. See the analogue?

So you want friendly advice? Well, it's too late for the first piece of advice which would have been GET MORE EXPERIENCE so I'll try to be helpful. Hire a professional sailor to work with you and develop your skills and do part or all of the trip with you. Make sure you have excellent carpentry and mechanical skills....oh and a lot of cash to spare would be helpful too.

Beyond that, if you are still in Washington, DC, please consider visiting me about a 45 minute's drive from downtown and buy me a nice dinner--a really nice dinner and drinks--preferably really nice vintage red wines and I won't charge you my normal consulting feel or any fee for that matter to "pick my brains" for a few hours. I'm willing to do that because I really want to know your story and how you are able to do what you are doing--and it might be fun and entertaining. At middle age and with over 40 years solid sailing experience, even looking at buying a later-model glass sailboat can sometimes tax my knowledge and skills. So I want to meet you and understand how a PhD got into this thing. I wish you well and please, feel free to send a personal message if you'd like to take me up on my offer. It might make an interesting article for me to write about in Wooden Boat or perhaps Sail...

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Old 24-06-2013, 21:44   #30
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Re: New Skipper, Old Boat

By the way, regarding anchors, you wrote (jokingly?) "some kind of metal one I presume?" Well, you bought a wooden boat--so why not a wooden anchor? Ok, so now I'm being flippant, but really now, were you serious? Some kind of metal I presume?
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