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Old 23-01-2008, 17:18   #16
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Originally Posted by gobi1570 View Post
What is a parachute sea anchor, and how does it make storms more manageable? See, I really have no idea what I'm doing, hehe.
Here is something that you may find helpful:
Sea Anchor and Para Anchor Rigging Information

Data From the Drag Device Database , Victor Shane

DRAG DEVICES-OCEAN NAVIGATOR MAGAZINE ISSUE NO. 70
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Old 23-01-2008, 17:41   #17
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Gobi - I was somewhat tongue in cheek in my last response - I hope you "felt" that.

I recognize everyone is on a different timeline.

I am sort of responding in general that for a couple or solo person a smaller boat, at a very affordable cost, is truly a viable option. The westsail is known to be slow but who's in a hurry?

And kanani is right - Singapore/Malysia/Indonesia waters are well protected and there are literaly thousands of places to visit while "practicing." In fact I have no intentions to leave the Asia/Pacific region. You could spend a lifetime exploring around here.

Getting "around" the world sounds too much like getting a check mark in a column - I get plenty of that at work - LOL.

In simple terms - The sea (waves) and the wind head in the same direction (not always). The para anchor is attached to the bow of the boat and is like an underwater parachute. Because the wind and the sea are driving you downwind and downsea the drag of the parachute on the bow holds the bow into the wind where the bow is most effective in taking on the sea (waves). In a proper rig in some of the worst storms you can set the anchor, drop all but maybe a storm sail, go below and go to sleep until the storm is over.

Convergent sea systems and other wind and sea factors can confuse the issue but the sea anchor is a great line of defense.
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Old 23-01-2008, 18:51   #18
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Aloha Brian,
Welcome aboard!! Folks are encouraging you to go as soon as you can. There are lots of books in the public library that will get you familiar with boat styles and sailing but the best way to learn is by doing or crewing for others that do.
Remember, every boat for sale is the best boat in the world (according to the seller) and every sailor is the best sailor in the world (according to the them).
If you start looking at boats then tell us what you are looking at and we can provide comments concerning that model. There are so many boats available that you need to start somewhere. If it were me I'd pick 32-36 feet on deck, a cutter rig, fiberglass hull, diesel engine and an aft cockpit. That's just one opinion. There are many more.
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Old 23-01-2008, 19:13   #19
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Aloha Brian,
Welcome aboard!! Folks are encouraging you to go as soon as you can. There are lots of books in the public library that will get you familiar with boat styles and sailing but the best way to learn is by doing or crewing for others that do.
Remember, every boat for sale is the best boat in the world (according to the seller) and every sailor is the best sailor in the world (according to the them).
If you start looking at boats then tell us what you are looking at and we can provide comments concerning that model. There are so many boats available that you need to start somewhere. If it were me I'd pick 32-36 feet on deck, a cutter rig, fiberglass hull, diesel engine and an aft cockpit. That's just one opinion. There are many more.
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But John!!! I thought I was the best sailor with the best boat? Allot of great input here. I know that you might want to ease into cruising but if you have the money now...go now. Even if it is for a season. You can pick up experienced crew where ever you are. With the way things are going these days, time might be running out.
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Old 24-01-2008, 03:35   #20
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And kanani is right - Singapore/Malysia/Indonesia waters are well protected and there are literaly thousands of places to visit while "practicing." In fact I have no intentions to leave the Asia/Pacific region. You could spend a lifetime exploring around here.
Ahh, that sounds wonderful. You have no idea how much I'd love to get out of this country, permanently.
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Old 29-01-2008, 18:36   #21
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This is a little more money than I had originally planned, but what do you guys think of this boat for my needs? I would want to add a wind vane, and the aforementioned parachute anchor, but it sounds like this puppy has everything I need for long-distance one-man cruising. It's be great if some of the experts could chime in.





35' Com-Pac 35
  • Year: 2006
  • Hull Material: Fiberglass
  • Engine/Fuel Type: Single Diesel
REDUCED ~~ REDUCED

The Com-Pac 35 was designed to be shoal-draft, stable, seakindly and fast. Performance is achieved by combining generous sail plan, moderate displacement, long waterline, generous beam, high ballast / displacement-ratio and the redeeming benefits of shoal-draft Scheel Keel. Beating to windward or running before the wind, full sail or reefed, the Com-Pac 35 is responsive and swift.





Additional Specs, Equipment and Information:

Builder/Designer


Builder: Com-Pac
Designer: Charley Morgan
Dimensions


LOA: 36' 9"
LWL: 29'
Beam: 11' 10"
Displacement: 12,500 lbs
Draft: 4'
Ballast: 5,700 lbs



Engines


Engine(s): 3 cylinder diesel
Engine(s) HP: 27
Engine Model: Westerbeke









Tankage


Fuel: 30 gal
Water: 75 gal
Holding: 13 gal





Description:
Stand at the helm of performance:

Beneath your feet is a yacht whose form is born of modern technology. A yacht whose performance is achieved by the blending of hull, keel, rudder and sailplan into one totally original, harmonious design.

Beating to windward or running before the wind, full sail or reefed the Com-Pac 35 embodies the responsiveness and swiftness that you desire. Exploring the islands, offshore cruising, or Wednesday night club racing, you have the knowledge that it will do anything you ask of it.

The styling of the Com-Pac 35 is neither space age modern nor 19th century traditional. It is timeless and elegant, immune to the whims of fad or fashion. Here is a space that compels you to partake of its luxury. There is a sense of warmth and protection. Enjoy its privacy and spaciousness. Traditional materials and soft colored fabrics are combined with contemporary design. An air bright hominess results. Attention to detail is evidenced throughout. The accommodations are logical and orderly. Each element is where you would expect it to be, and of a size that makes it totally functional.





Designers Comments:

I was delighted when the Hutchins family asked me to design a new yacht as the latest addition to Com-Pac Yacht’s line of “Good Little Ships”.

The Com-Pac development and marketing team had few limitations beyond – it must be shoal draft, stable, sea kindly and fast enough to give good results under PHRF rules.

We knew we couldn’t go wrong relying on the tried and true Herreshoff practice of combining generous sailplan, moderate displacement, long waterline, generous beam, high ballast/displacement ratio and the redeeming benefits of shoal draft, made amazingly efficient using the famous Henry Scheel Keel configuration. The final result is the Com-Pac 35. We have presented a hull and keel combination that in conjunction with the sailplan will give the maximum performance possible without sacrificing the comfort and convenience you have come to expect from Com-Pac Yachts. A traditionally styled, shoal draft, cruising yacht? YES! A high tech, performance-oriented underbelly and sailplan, establishing if desired, a club-racing contender? YES!

The 12’ beam allows for a voluminous interior. From the aft cabin with double berth to the forward cabin with a large sea-going V-berth, every inch of the Com-Pac 35 interior has been completely thought out with the cruising sailor in mind. The interior is complete, private, comfortable, and functional. An interesting adjunct to the livability of the Com-Pac 35 is the integrating of stereo, television, video planer and microwave oven as standard equipment.

The most exciting part of this project has been the design concept. While we have maintained all the principles that have made Com-Pac a success such as, traditional styling, cruising comfort, quality construction, and competitive pricing, the new Com-Pac 35 will herald the beginning of a new concept for a Com-Pac yacht. Scheel Keel, “Euro-style” transom, hardware selection, interior layout and overall appearance are but a few of the obvious items that attest to the Hutchins Company’s desire to offer a no-nonsense, premium quality yacht that embodies all the elements necessary in today’s demanding marketplace.

I am proud to be a part of the Hutchins Company’s continuing program of design and development.

Charley Morgan





Galley
  • “L” shaped galley
  • Double stainless steel galley sink with retractable spray faucet
  • Adler Barbour Cold Machine


Electrical
  • 3 maintenance free gel batteries – 1 for engine start, 2 for ship
  • "TABS" Total automatic battery system by Wells Marine Technology
  • 2 battery switches – 1 for engine, 1 for ship
  • 20 amp automatic battery charger
  • Master electrical panel – AC/DC with volt and amp gauges – breaker for optional electronics


Electronics
  • Autohelm 6001 w/SIG core pack
  • Navman speed/depth - Multi 3100
  • Navman wind 3150
  • Navman 5600 chart plotter
  • Furuno 1715 radar
  • Uniden UM625C color DSC VHF w TFT display


Sails, Rigging and Hardware
  • Harken 40.2 STC, 2 speed, self-tailing sheet winches
  • Complete Harken deck hardware
  • All sail controls – halyards, sheets, etc, led to cockpit
  • Genoa-Dacron, roller furling 135% acrylic cover
  • Mainsail – Dacron, full batten, Dutchman flaking
  • 2 single line reefing systems
  • Harken roller furling for headsail
  • Custom mainsail track
  • Windex w aft extension mounted on mast head


Deck
  • Lewmar Sprint 1000 Electric windlass
  • Integrated swim platform/boarding ladder on transom
  • 4 overhead Lexan hatches with convertible screen/shades
  • 10 stainless steel opening portholes with screens
  • 2 alloy opening portholes in cockpit bulkheads with screens and shades
  • “T” cockpit with 2 seat hatches
  • Edson CD-i-geared, drag link steering system
  • Edson Diamond series command center pedestal
  • Hot and cold water stern shower
  • CQR 35# anchor w 40' chain and 200' rode
  • Heavy duty rigid rubrail with S.S. Striker
  • Stainless steel bowsprit with 2 built in anchor rollers and anchor storage capability
  • Double lifelines with side gates
  • Stainless steel double bow and stern rails
  • Transom mount boarding ladder with steps
  • 2 stainless steel deck ventilators with S.S. guard
  • Masthead anchor light
  • Midmast steaming light combination with deck light
  • Two Perco 35 watt spreader lights
  • Custom dodger w hand holds
  • Pedestal cover
  • Sail cover w logos


Additional
  • Patented Scheel Keel for maximum performance with shoal draft
  • 3 cabin layout – foreward, salon, aft cabin
  • Double berth in each cabin
  • Hanging lockers in foreward and aft cabin
  • Aft head with separate shower
  • Navigation station with large electronics cabinet
  • “L” shaped dinette with drop leaf table
  • Large tableback dinnerware storage
  • Dinette convertible to double berth
  • Dual function switchable dome lights - Red/White
  • Three Hella Turbo fans - V berth, Salon, Aft cabin
  • Entertainment center with stereo, television, and video player
  • 4 stereo speakers – 2 main salon, 2 cockpit
  • Edson CD-i-geared, drag link steering system
  • Keel stepped mast
  • Epoxy bottomcoat and anti-fouling paint
  • Racor water separator fuel filter
  • Deluxe instrument panel with tach, water temp and volt gauge
  • Cockpit mounted fuel gauge
  • Cockpit and transom courtesy lights
  • Engine room and sail locker lights
  • Pressure water system – hot and cold water in galley, head, head shower and cockpit shower
  • 6 gallon water heater with engine heat exchanger and 115v AC operation
  • Manual and automatic electric bilge pumps
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Old 29-01-2008, 20:02   #22
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Off the top of my head the displacement for the length and wide beam and small tanks does not seem to make it a great offshore boat. Most of the gear is adequately sized for coastal work. It's fundementally a light boat because that was what they wanted it to be. Might be fun to sail.

Might be a nice coastal boat. It may not be a fair comparisson but it seems gaining some experience would also put you in a better position to select a boat based on reasons you understood from a little more firsthand experience. I would hope you wouldn't buy a boat because a few folks on the Internet said it would be a good choice. A large percentage of the formula for the right boat has to do with you. In your budget you can't afford the perfect boat. The question to figure out is what compromises can you make from an informed opinion. The boat is only one element even if it is important the rest is no less important.
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Old 29-01-2008, 20:44   #23
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Thanks for the advice. They were selling it as a great offshore boat, and that's why I was looking at it. It also seemed fairly well equipped. How large do my tanks need to be for one person? What kind of boat should I be looking at for single-handing?
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Old 01-02-2008, 16:42   #24
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Anyone else have suggestions for a good boat for a single-hander that wants to circumnavigate? I've been looking at a lot of the listings and not finding much that I like so far aside from the Com-Pac I posted above.
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Old 01-02-2008, 21:16   #25
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Hi Brian, and welcome. I am new too; I bought a less-expensive coastal cruiser to hone my skills on while I take time to find something more sea-kindly. Take a look at the Crealock designed Pacific Seacraft. They make a 34 and a 37 that I think highly of. If I were alone, I would likely choose the 34. I am curious to hear what others think of this choice as well. Again, welcome!
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Old 02-02-2008, 00:57   #26
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Another look might be an Alajuala 34. The Com-pac seems beamy. Tartan 37 is also a good choice.
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Old 02-02-2008, 03:05   #27
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What do you mean when you say "beamy"?
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Old 02-02-2008, 07:04   #28
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Quote:
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... The Com-pac seems beamy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by gobi1570 View Post
What do you mean when you say "beamy"?


A Beam of 11' 10", on a LOA of 36' 9" (LWL: 29') represents a LOA/Beam ratio of about 3.1, which is towards the “beamy” end of “normal” , but see below.

A normal L/B ratio, for 30 – 45 footers, has often been cited as between 3.0 to 3.5; tho' 3.0 to 3.1 seems to have become the modern norm.

A very beamy boat (L/B 2.5 - 3.0) might not sail as well, especially when close to the wind, and might have the tendency to broach in gusty winds. The length to beam ratio is an indication of form stability.

At the “narrow” end of the spectrum (L/B 3.5 - 5.0), a less beamy boat will generally be faster.
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