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Old 18-03-2009, 10:12   #16
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As far as boat design goes, there are great boats of all shapes & sizes & number of hulls. I think Jobberone - you ought to get out sailing on a variety of boats. I agree with Feelsgood about the importance of crew. While you might want your boat to be sailed singlehanded, the easiest passages are made with adequate crew - I like 2 additional people to be able to create a reasonable watch structure. Many more people than that and the chances of personality conflicts increase.
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Old 18-03-2009, 10:35   #17
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Plenty - like I mean Plenty - of Multis have gone round the world, from little 26ft heavenly twins to large and luxurious, Its not how many hulls it has, its how well its built, how well the systems work and how well its sailed.
I did not write anything about excluding multihulls from anyones shortlist. I was writing about looking things more openly, not to focus on them only. With a competent crews all kinds of vessels have crossed oceans. There is now a British gentleman that aims to sail over the Atlantic with a boat less than 4 feet of hull length.

I agree that excluding some obvious sturctural problems of certain designs - and I do not mean multihulls - the crew is most likely the cause of all the major problems. However, I furthermore assume, that most crews will make a mistake sooner or later. I could not guarantee that I by myself or my crew would never do something wrong. That is most likely to happen in a prologened strom everyone being really exhausted. And that is the moment you really could not afford to do so. Should that happen, then there would also be a moment when the life and death of the crew depends on the vessels ability to cope what is coming - including massive breaking waves from a very undesirable direction. If that assumption is fair, then it would be usefull to study what is written about the seaworthines of different designs. There sure a good and bad designs and constructions regardless of the number of hulls.
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Old 18-03-2009, 14:27   #18
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Aloha Jobber,
Welcome aboard the forum of many opinions!
There is a great many opinions on what boats are best for what you want to do.
You mentioned that you want fiberglass. That's a great decision and a good start. May I also recommend diesel auxiliary power as the next absolute criteria.
I always recommend 32 to 36 LOD and cutter rig but since you are looking for a very stable platform you might want to go bigger. I like aft cockipits. If you like to sail in shallow water some boats have shoal keel versions with the draft being about 4' and that should get you safely into almost all ports. You might even be talked into a catamaran but I do prefer monohulls just for the way they feel to me when sailing.
Lots of decisions to go with.

Here's a good link if you want to search the web for answers. Cruisers & Sailing Forum

Good luck in your search. You are in a good area to purchase a boat. It is a buyers market.
Kind regards,
JohnL
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Old 18-03-2009, 19:32   #19
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Thanks all. I've actually started looking at aluminum boats as well as fiberglass. And there's nothing wrong with wood but I don't think that's for me.

I do wish a bigger boat. To me the bigger the better. Every boat I've ever been on has been too small at times. I'm thinking 50 feet as my max with 40ish being about right to start. I am concerned about draft. I'm looking at one boat that is aluminum with a draft of 11' down and 3-11'' up. It is designed to allow the boat to sit upright. I think this may sound grandiose to some coming from a non-sailor but I do not wish to have to buy or trade up anytime soon and would prefer to get it as right as possible from the get go. So I'll take my time looking and hopefully find something that has many more positives than negatives, is safe, and livable.

Someone has invited me to crew a leg or two with them to Trinidad. I'm hoping that will work out for them and me. That would be a great start to my next great adventure.

Thanks to all again.
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Old 19-03-2009, 01:13   #20
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There is a French manufacturer Alubat (http://www.alubat.com/) producing Ovni boats. They are made of alloy and have a lifting keel - just like something you are thinking about. You can just park on the beach and let the tide leave you on a dry land. They market the boats as 4x4 of the sea, so I _suppose_ they might be somewhat seaworthy as well. They would also fit to your 40-50 feet size category. New ones are fairly pricy, however, I assume they have been around for quite a while.

Someone else knowing more about Ovni or similar lifting/shallow keel alloy boats?
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Old 19-03-2009, 06:34   #21
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There are plenty of deep draft boats in the Bahamas. Ours draws 6'6". You just have to watch your tides. They're a little more worrying but can be done and you don't bounce around as much when those Noreasters blow through.
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Old 19-03-2009, 06:39   #22
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Jabber,
I've been living aboard for a year and half now A man with a plan can overcome anything. I never understood single handers who set off on world tours. They must be recluses or hermits; I would go nuts.

All the best!
Follow the quotes!!! the most important being A MAN WITH A PLAN, I retired last yeart and bought a trailerable coastalcruiser. My plan is to sail all over America for 5 years. with a trailer sailor I can go from Quebec City to the Florida Keys in 5 days. Then buy a blue water boat and go to Australia, sell the boat in australia..fly to California buy another boat and go spend a few years in Hawaii. Then you can set me adrift with my dog!!! thats where my plan ends in Hawaii on a boat!

I have realized that I can do what ever I want if I have a plan with a time line written in my agenda.
I realize that 95% of people do not have a written plan set down in an agenda and ........what ever happens,sometimes OK , sometime snot but that's par for the course.
Go for it
A written PLAN works!
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p.s. See you in Hawaii
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Old 20-03-2009, 09:41   #23
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someone sent me this Maritime Yacht Sales (St. Thomas, Virgin Islands)

Well the price is right and the boat is made for the Caribbean but I'd likely have to sell her before going anywhere but.... I have mechanical abilities but much less than a professional although I have plenty of time. BTW, do broken chainplates mean the mast has problems? Would most of the rigging need to be replaced? How hard is it going to be to sell her and what questions needs to be asked?
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Old 20-03-2009, 10:38   #24
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You're in a position to use a reliable, trustworthy surveyor on any vessel you decide is right. You can't trust a salesman's claim that there's no structural damage. In my opinion broken chainplates mean there's been considerable stress overloading in the area of the chainplates. This sounds like a major project boat which is fine, as long as you know that going in and are prepared to spend considerably more than anticipated to make the boat seaworthy. Count on replacing the all standing and running rigging unless there's cerifiable verification it has just been replaced
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Old 20-03-2009, 11:14   #25
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You're in a position to use a reliable, trustworthy surveyor on any vessel you decide is right. You can't trust a salesman's claim that there's no structural damage. In my opinion broken chainplates mean there's been considerable stress overloading in the area of the chainplates. This sounds like a major project boat which is fine, as long as you know that going in and are prepared to spend considerably more than anticipated to make the boat seaworthy. Count on replacing the all standing and running rigging unless there's cerifiable verification it has just been replaced
Don't really know sailboats but I'd bet there is more than either meets my eye or I'm being told. I just learned the boat was not insured and the owner doesn't have the will to repair it. I'd still have to have a surveyor there go over it and one of my hire. I'd go look at it but I still wouldn't have all the info I needed. Perhaps I'll do both.

Before I make a major move esp on a boat that's damaged, I need to know after I finish with all the necessary work I'll have a boat I want and can use. My thinking is this is just a boat for the Caribbean and not one for an inexperienced captain to be making major passages in. Is that correct?
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Old 20-03-2009, 12:09   #26
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I need to know I can get medical care and medications like insulin, etc before making any grandiose plans.

Obviously I need a blue water boat. Money is a concern but quality, safety, live aboard, resale, etc is more important to be. I'm thinking 150K+ and want it to be able to be single handed. I do not have the strength and endurance I had even a few years ago. .
First...If money is a big factor and you are on a fixed income. There is no reason to spend $150K. You could buy a really nice 35ft. boat for 1/2 that. Assuming you are going to be doing most of the work aboard, then you really only want to go with a 35ft. boat. The rest of that $150K budget can go a loooong way cruising. Generally, no problems getting medication in other countries. Their restrictions are much better than in the US.
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Old 20-03-2009, 12:09   #27
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Hi Jobberone,

Welcome also from me - and enjoy the multi v mono argument that your comment might now create.

For me, either would do. For you - suggest best to reduce the options to simple stuff.

Mono - cheaper per foot to buy and park up in a marina, possible edge in upwind sailing and when the poo hits the weather fan.
Multi - more space per foot, upright sailing, possible edge when offwind sailing.

Either one fine for what you plan.

Adlrad Coles advice a good read but not actually so relevant today as it was back then. You'd be the exception if you ever hit the kind of weather he covers, provided you spend time planning your routes.

But like all the others - fully support your goal of getting out there and doing it.

Good luck, enjoy
JOHN
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Old 21-03-2009, 15:26   #28
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Here is one I'm thinking real hard on. Seems to be made for me. 1981 Hunter Sloop Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

What do you all think?
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Old 27-03-2009, 05:34   #29
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may I suggest a boat with very little mods needed to be done, as I see in the pictures, when sitting at the helm your'e mainsheet and genoa sheets are right where you need them, a little more work all the halyards and reefing line could be brought back as well, this boat could use an electronics upgrade which is fairly simple and the only other thing I would add to this boat is a scanmar "monitor" self steering vane. I recently installed one on a Gozzard for a member on this site and became very good friends with it! Although the draft of this boat is a little deeper than you would like, you can still do the Bahamas, just in a little different loop, I personally like short handed sailing and would choose this one. Deeper dodger, radar/chartplotter, solar panel, and a wind bugger for battery maint. a good battery management setup and a larger or second fuel tank and off I would go, and it's a very nice looking boat to look at. I have set boats up for many people and some with "disabilities", My father has an elbow that does not bend, So when I say he sails single handed, he really does. So here is the link to what I think is the best bang for buck.

1978 Fisksatra Swede 55 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Good luck with your new found adventure.
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