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Old 12-04-2006, 13:01   #1
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Introduction of Kevin aboard Raven



Hello. My name is Kevin Rose and I live aboard Raven, a Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34. My home port is Burlington, Vermont, on Lake Champlain (120 mile long gem of a lake between Vermont's Green Mountains and the Adirondacks of New York - or, four days up the Hudson and the Champlain Canal from New York City)

I am a single dad of 11 and 13-year-old sons, Jackson and David (who split their time between living aboard with me and living on land with their mother in Burlington).

I own a sea kayak touring company, PaddleWays, and run the business from my office aboard Raven. I also assist the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum with rowing programs in their fleet of 32 ft, six-oared Cornish pilot gigs.

In addition to the fleet of touring kayaks and Crealock 34, I have a Nacra 6.0na (20 ft racing catamaran) that I sail whenever a rush of adrenaline is needed.

My interest in this forum is primarily to connect with those who understand and appreciate the live-aboard lifestyle (too many of my land-based aquaintances have trouble relating to life aboard), and to share information (and tales of adventure/misadventure).

Thanks in advance for the opportunity to share a bit of the journey with all of you.
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Old 12-04-2006, 13:11   #2
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Welcome aboard Kevin.

Nice to meet another "Kevin" on this site!!

I have visited your site in the past. Nice site by the way!!

Anyway, welcome aboard cruisersforum!!
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Old 12-04-2006, 13:33   #3
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Hi

Nice colour on the hull.
Michael
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Old 13-04-2006, 11:12   #4
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I think many of us would rather be you - living aboard. Nice tax write off on your boat by the way.
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Old 13-04-2006, 12:09   #5
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Yes, there are advantages to the S-corp. Most of what I do involves boats of one sort or another and a healthy portion of the living expenses qualify as business expenses. In addition to the wholesale access to boating equipment, the "pro-purchase" perks for outdoor clothing and toys help with the budget.

My "neighbor" works at a web application development business from his boat-based office. Both of our work requirements involve regular trips up the bay to Burlington harbor. Rush hour traffic happens when both Doug and I leave the moorings at the same time. Rather than worrying about "road rage", we will often find ourselves in a mini-regatta if the competitive urge is present - a far more enjoyable way to commute.

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Old 14-04-2006, 14:57   #6
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Hi Kevin
I have also just joined the forum. I would be interested of any thoughts you have on the Pacific Seacraft (Raven looks great by the way) and any advice you might have for a wanabe live aboard.
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Old 14-04-2006, 22:20   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerubb
I would be interested of any thoughts you have on the Pacific Seacraft (Raven looks great by the way) and any advice you might have for a wanabe live aboard.
I cannot say enough good things about the Bill Crealock design and the fine craftsmanship that Pacific Seacraft displays in her build.

In today's market for dockside accommodations with large aft cabins and swim platforms, the canoe stern is something that even Pacific Seacraft is moving away from, but for those looking for a bluewater capable boat that is very forgiving and well balanced, the Crealock 34 and the larger sibling, the Crealock 37 would be good choices (IMHO). The cabin layout is very "traditional" - a v-berth, centerline table with salon berths, and a quarterberth aft of the nav station. High, teak-capped bulwarks, bombproof bronze hardware throughout, a well-protected and very solid rudder, low-volume cockpit - it's a boat for the traditionalist.

That said, there may be those who would question its suitability for the day-to-day live-aboard with no plans to cross oceans.

During my search, I traveled up and down the east coast of the U.S., looking primarily in the 37 foot range. I could have gotten a larger boat for less money, but I resisted the urge to go bigger. I ended up with a wonderful 34-footer that I can easily handle by myself, is a pure joy to sail, and makes my heart skip a beat every time I look at her. She has met my needs well.

Advice for the live-aboard wanabe? Whew. That's a broad topic. Any way to narrow it down a bit?

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Old 14-04-2006, 23:17   #8
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Thanks for your advice re Pacific Seacraft. We don’t see too many over here in Oz but I have long been an admirer of Crealock designs.

Regarding live aboard advice, you have already answered one of my questions, that being the question of size. It would be nice to live on a 65 footer, for the space, but I want to be able to sail her on my own and also keep maintenance as low as possible. I am a great believer in learning from others experiences, good and bad, hence my question. On reflection it is a bit open ended. I guess my main concern is one of adapting from a large house to a small yacht. Storage of clothes, books and all the things we take for granted ashore.
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Old 15-04-2006, 08:42   #9
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How much space?

> It would be nice to live on a 65 footer,
> for the space, but I want to be able to sail
> her on my own and also keep maintenance
> as low as possible.

I suppose it all depends on what one is looking for. If the goal is simply to trade a land-based life for one afloat, there may be the temptation to incorporate all of the conveniences and space of a land-based existance into a spacious and well-equipped yacht. If, however, the goal is to shed some of the burden and live a simpler life, the larger boat will likely prove to be a step in the wrong direction.

At the other end of the spectrum, we have all heard the stories of those who've taken to sea in small boats. Yes, it is possible to cross oceans in a 20 foot Flicka. A friend of mine went around the world in a 26-footer. As one who often lives out of a tent, I thought that 26 feet would be adequate and started looking at Contessa 26's - a solid, well-proven Folkboat design.

At 6' 2", I couldn't stand up in the cabin unless my head and shoulders were up through the hatch. Yes, I could have made do with stooping or sitting whenever inside, but I decided that over the long-term I'd want a bit more space.

My search criteria jumped up to the 37-footers. I started looking at Tartan's - another well-proven design that would also be fun to sail. The 37-footer search also yielded the Crealock 37. Ah, I thought, that would be my dream boat if money were no object. (I'm a traditionalist when it comes to boats. The more contemporary designs just don't have the same appeal to me. Bill Crealock's designs have a very nice blend of "salty" qualities.)

While trying out a number of Tartan 37's I included a couple of Crealock 37's along the way. The Tartans were nice. I could have been perfectly happy with one of them, but the solidly built Crealocks with that beautiful canoe stern and lots of teak and bronze tugged at my heartstrings.


Enter the Crealock 34. Modeled after her larger sister, the boats are virtually identical. The 34 gives up a foot of beam, a foot and a half from the cockpit, and some room in the v-berth. It gains, however, a much more managable sailplan (for the singlehander) and a marked reduction in cost (while giving me 6' 3" of headroom inside). For me, I knew it was the right boat as soon as I stepped aboard.
> I guess my main concern is one of adapting
> from a large house to a small yacht.


Oh, yes, that's where I was headed with that thought . . .

If the motive is to simplify, a boat can be the ideal solution as it becomes a very strictly imposed limitation to material accumulation. (All the "stuff" either won't fit, or it'll much more rapidly malfunction/decay.) If the motive is to move from land to sea without giving up much, the transition will be much more difficult. The burdens and frustrations of life aboard may then prove to complicate things beyond the burdens that one had hoped to escape on land.

As for me, I had always desired a simpler way of living. I'd grown up with the ideals of the 60's and 70's, considered myself an environmental activist, and started my career as a natural resource planner. Then, along the way, I ended up slipping into the common mold, doing what I was "supposed" to do. Deep inside, however, that pent up desire for something radically different remained. For me, the break up of a sixteen year marriage provided the motivation and opportunity for a departure from the path I was on. I quickly learned how little "stuff" I really need. In fact, I have loads of space to spare aboard Raven (waiting to be filled with stores and spares when the bluewater calls).

I recently read an article in the NY Times about a proposal for a 39,000 square foot home in Greenwich, Connecticut. Thirty-nine thousand square feet! That's alomost 18 times the size of the average American home (2,200 sq ft), but one should also keep in mind that the average American home size is four times the international average. What's more, between 1950 and 2000, the size of the average new home in America has doubled, while the family size has fallen by more than 25 percent.


No, thank you. It's not for me.
"You know you have reached perfection of design not when you have nothing more to add, but when you have nothing more to take away."
Antoine de Saint Exupéry







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Old 15-04-2006, 10:11   #10
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Great advice Kevin. Thanks, You have helped clarify my thinking enormously.
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Old 15-04-2006, 11:11   #11
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Zerubb - there is a really good forum on this site about living aboard. Great discussions - feel free to roam about.
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Old 15-04-2006, 11:16   #12
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Is all that roaming why you are so Elusive
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Old 15-04-2006, 11:19   #13
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Scott - NOOOOOOOOOO I don't do enough roaming so THAT is what is elusive

FYI: http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...splay.php?f=73

forgot to include a link to the liveaboard forum
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Old 15-04-2006, 13:30   #14
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Thank's a lot for that. The more info the better in my very confused state!
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Old 20-04-2006, 08:38   #15
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Nice boat Kevin

I've always been a fan of the traditional style boats myself yours looks like it is well found. Anyone out there familiar with the Westsail 32 or 28. I'm in the process of selling my home (kids are all gone) and finding something my wife and I can live on part of the year. Both the Crealock 34 and the Westsail 32 catch my eye but it seems there are more Westsails available.
Thanks
Dave
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