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Old 29-01-2009, 10:27   #1
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Hoping to be new cruisers-Need your wisdom!

Hi there, My girlfriend and I are in the market for a blue water boat with a very limited budget. We also know very little about everything when it comes to blue water cruising. But every journey starts somewhere and it looks like this forum will be one of our stops. I hope to find some folks here that are willing to share some of their knowledge with us and maybe we can supply some challenges and a little entertainmment in return. Right now we're in the market for the boat and have narrowed the field down to 20 boats and about 12 designs. We have a good idea of the equipment we want and are shooting to be sailing away in a year!! Can't wait to chat with you. Mark
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Old 29-01-2009, 10:38   #2
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Greetings and welcome aboard Mark.
Best of luck in finding your cruiser, and sailing away within a year. It may be a challenge, but a worthwhile one for certain.
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Old 29-01-2009, 10:44   #3
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Hey Mark, welcome to this forum!
It should be a pretty good buyers market out there.
Keep us up to date with your shopping...I really enjoy watching the process.
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Old 29-01-2009, 16:28   #4
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Thanks. After reading a few threads it looks like I'm in the right place. I can't wait to get into some good chats. First stop the "Monohull Sailboats Forum"!
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Old 29-01-2009, 20:46   #5
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How limited is your budget? Most folks prefer to cruise in boats above 40 foot in length. They have more interior room for people and supplies. There are lots available in the $25k to $50k range. You can find them towards the back of the hardstand usually with rainwater in the bilge. The Morgan OI 41 has a solid reutation. They were built with the charter trade in mind. I saw one at Lippincott Marina in Grasonville MD. The asking price was $35k. It needed some cleaning and I never saw the interior. You can also find a Gulfstar 40-something here and there.

I bought a Columbia 41 for $25k in cash. The owner was having female trouble and needed to sell it just to keep the peace. Its a good solid boat.

The thing with boats over 10 years old is this; its very hard to get financing on them no matter how good the survey says they are. So you may need to save your nickles to get the boat you want.
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Old 29-01-2009, 23:46   #6
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We have a 30 grand budget for the boat and 30 for the cruising kitty. We're hoping to keep the outfitting between 10 and 20 grand with some help from family and friends. We have the cash for the boat and are pinching pennies everyday for the rest.

We have 20 boats on our short list that meet the cost criteria with at least a few handy pieces of equipment. The boats are a couple Bristols from the 70's, Irwin Citation 40's, Hughes 38, Morgans 38, Endeavour 37 Ketch, Niagra 35, Tyanna Cutter, even a Cat Ketch! I'm in the process of reading as much as I can on the builders to find out which boats I can knock off the list. It's really exciting for us!

One step at a time I guess and we'd like to have the boat by May. I should probably move this post to the monohull section, but it's great that people are taking notice of us. It feels good to have people to talk to about all this as most people around us don't really understand what it is we want to do. Thanks!
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Old 30-01-2009, 06:13   #7
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In that price range it would be worth considering a ferro boat, as you get a lot of boat for little money. However, only consider one that was professionally built, and use a surveyor that understands ferro
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Old 30-01-2009, 06:59   #8
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Originally Posted by Talbot View Post
In that price range it would be worth considering a ferro boat, as you get a lot of boat for little money. However, only consider one that was professionally built, and use a surveyor that understands ferro
There is a continuous debate in here on the pros and cons of ferro as a boatbuilding material. Someone even wrote a song about it. But to advance the cause perhaps you should concentrate on the boats you have already researched. For me, the deciding factors are:

1. Cumfort is more important than speed. That is because, on average, 100 miles made good per day is rule of thumb for all boats regardless of size. That comes to a bit less than 5kn constant speed.
2. Interior space should be cumfortable and homey. Wood is good. Hand holds always within reach. No carpet because it will get wet and stay wet. A sit down nav station because this is where you will write your book about the year's voyage.
3. Ample storage for food, books, clothing. Large 100 gallon water tank. Jerry cans on deck are looking for trouble. Good size diesel tank, say 50 gallons minimum.
4. Self steering of some kind. Wheel autopilot or wind vane. Have mercy on the helmsman.
5. Buy a small gasoline (yes, I know, I know) powered generator. Keep this bagged up for the time when your batteries are flat and you need to start the motor to get into a safe harbor. Drag the generator on deck and fire it up. Plug your shore power in and charge the batteries. This is only for emergencies. Don't make it a way of life.
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Old 30-01-2009, 08:14   #9
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Thanks for great tips, I'll keep them in mind for sure. Ferro is out though. I've read too many bad reviews and at least I can fix fiberglass myself(some thing anyways). Once I've done my reserch on the boat types I have I'll be posting in the monohull section for as much input as I can get.
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Old 30-01-2009, 13:11   #10
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Aloha Mark,
Myself, personally, would not get anything more than 36 foot LOD. Fiberglass, diesel inboard, aft cockpit and cutter rigs are my favorites. I believe the Tayanna is going to be way overbudget for you. I'd consider Pearsons and Tartans in your short list. You've probably already found all the websites for used boats? Sailboatlistings.com, Yachtworld and craigslist. Don't consider a boat unless you get a survey.
Good luck and please offer us a chance to comment on some of the boats that you are really really interested in. Some former owners here can give you a heads up on what to expect from your choices.
Kind regards,
JohnL
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Old 30-01-2009, 13:28   #11
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Mark, FWIW,
The Hughes 38 is a nice boat, I agree that a well found Tayana is probably out of your budget. 36-38 is about the right size. also think perhaps smaller, you should be able to find a very nice 32-34 in your price range. IT all depends on what you call cruising.... one of the smaller cape dory's, or a bristol channel cutter are both good offshore boats....
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Old 30-01-2009, 13:48   #12
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Mark,

Here is a great buy from the ad, of course a survey is nessesary. I am a big fan of Cal's.



Its a Cal 39, they are asking 39,000 but it would be a great buy at 30,000. All the boat you would ever need.
http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/10582


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Old 31-01-2009, 01:30   #13
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Aloha Mark...Well, this is the time to buy. If it's your first boat and want to go cruising, there is not need to spend a lot of $$$ I was born in your neck of the woods...Hamilton to be exact. My suggestion would be to grab your honey and go to Florida for a few months to find a boat. I think you can get an older fiberglass vessel under 35ft. for under $20,000. Do the Keys and the Caribbean. If you like it, get a better (not larger) boat and then the world is your oyster...good luck
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Old 31-01-2009, 07:22   #14
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I love that idea! We've only got one shot at this financially, careerwise and time in life wise(family). So the first boat has to be the right boat(I hope). We aren't going into dept for this so if things don't work out somewhere down the line, somewhere in the world, then we can just pick up and head home. I figure that if we find something that is structurally sound that'll be the start we need. Coupled with our "can do" attitude, I'll bet we'll be able to do this on an 80-90 thousand dollar budget.
Who ever put that Mahina Expedition page up, Thanks. The input on how the boats were built should prove very valuable. Mahina Expedition - Offshore Cruising Instruction
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Old 31-01-2009, 08:05   #15
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Mark,

Have you thought of making some money along the way? Do you have a portable skill?
1. I am thinking of CAD drafting, for example. CDC machines and lasers are computer driven. Autocad drawings are uploaded to make them go. CAD is a simple skill to learn on your laptop.
2. Perhaps you know marine electronics (12v systems) installation. That is a specialty and sober people are much in demand. If you can install a radar, GBS chart plotter, autopilot, etc. you will be remembered.
3. Do you know marine diesel systems? A certification in that will help find you employment. If you can install a folding prop life will be good.
4. Do you know marine plumbing systems? Can you install or repair a head, a pressure water pump, shower sump, etc. This is a marketable skill.
5. Do you know rigging? Can you arrange for and supervise pulling a mast? Do you know how to properly tune rigging? Can you install a roller furler?
6. Can you paint a boat bottom and deal with the mess in compliance with Clean Marina standards?
7. Do you have a marine resume written listing your skills?
8. Do you have other skills that would be needed in a port town? This is tricky since working other than on a cash only basis can lead to trouble with the authorities. If you have 10 years of verified employment and earned at least GBP35,000 last year you may qualify for legal UK work permission under the Highly Skilled Migrant Programme (HSMP). Google it and look for an agent-middle man to put the paperwork together for you. You can do it yourself but one tiny error and they will deny you flat. Once you are legal in the UK and are granted permission to stay the whole of the EU is open to you.
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