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Old 15-03-2010, 11:17   #1
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Smile Hello, I Am a Pro Boater with Dumb Questions!

Hello,

Thank you for taking the time to read my introduction and questions. The better you know me and my thoughts the better you can steer me in the right direction. I will ask more detailed questions in the proper forums in time. Now I hope to say hi and learn more about the experience of sailing.

I am sure IF I went to the head doctor they would diagnose me with obsessive compulsive disorder. Back in 94 I was in school and looking for a sport that was a challenge. I enjoyed scuba diving but it was more relaxing than challenging. Living in South Alabama why I got white water kayaking in my head is beyond me. We lacked elevation and dropping elevation is one of the two ingredients for white water. Today, I am considered a pro kayaker due to winning an expert class competition in freestyle. Very much like surfing but in a boat and on a river wave. I now live in the Chattanooga, TN area near the Ocoee River which was the home of the 96 Olympics for the white water events. For a number of years I have been working as the head kayak instructor for Ocoee Adventure Center. I also am a head guide/ trip leader for rafting on one of the most popular rivers in the world. I have been working the last three years with Joe Jacobi not only a Olympic Gold Medalist but the first person in the US to win a medal in white water canoeing. Extreme kayaking in my area steep creeking is another one of my specialties. I enjoy class IV+ dropping 200' a mile or so. Most of my friends and students have fun and risk their life's on a Regular basis on much harder and more dangerous. I love my sport and will always continue but I am at a point where I need some thing new in my life. The only real challenge I have now is upping the difficulty and danger. I am 36 now and not really wanting to put my family through me getting killed on the river, I don't run class V regular.

Last summer my mother talked my wife and I in to going on a family vacation to Mobile Bay. It was on the bay not gulf and unlike my sister I do not have kids yet and there was nothing to do there but chase your kids around the pool or get drunk. I get paid to have more fun than this place can offer!! She kept on they have FREE Hobie Cat rentals with the room. I took a sailing class in school and had about 10 minuets on a sunfish over 10yrs ago, that it sailing. This was enough to coax me in to going. They had 3 sizes of cats and this is what I did on this trip. It was fun!! They had a little wave and solo I flipped it 6 -10 times in an hour. I took the family out on the large one, needless to say it was great solo and with them. I got hooked and fast! That is my sailing experience to date....

This time a year I have more time than I would like. A result has been dreaming and researching boats. I would like some info on boats like all new people buy have a ton of questions more on the experience of sailing. We will start with the boat and then what it would be like under average conditions and extreme.

I am sold so far on the Nor'sea 27! My goals with boat. Trailer able hope not to have to use lift for boat or mast but understand I may. I do have a 4x4, f350 diesel with a Jake break and will always need a tow truck for my tractor. I live near the Tennessee River and would trailer to Florida mostly but possibly other places too. I have no intention at first of doing any true blue water sailing but want the boat to be capable with work or equipment down the road. I would like to be able to do a comfortable cruse with just my wife and I or say a few male friends with out feeling gay or just too close! I like the separate sleeping areas on the Norsea. There is also a chance I may do some day charter on the Tennessee. The owner of the rafting company I work for has a 70' charter boat on the Tennessee that he does marketing on.
http://www.bluemooncruises.org
I have not pitched this to him yet! I think we could work out a deal if I had a boat that he could sell seats on we could both make a few bucks, I understand not much more. I will speak with him prior to buying a boat but this will be goal #2 where my wife and I enjoying it will be goal #1.

I would like an idea of how any people this boat would handle. For a 6 hour day trip how many people would fit semi comfortably? How about a one to two week trip doing coastal cruising?

How much of a money pit is a sailboat? I have seen Nor'sea 27 asking prices from 15-50k. If I find one that looks decent/not new but nice with low hours on the engine how much more will it take usually to get it to a boat I could use for coastal cruising and day charter. My budget will be 20-30k and understand it will not be ready to sail around the world YET. Would this take care of my needs now? How much less do most people take on their boat then their asking price? I know nothing of the sailboat market but looks like a buyers market for sure! The Nor'sea is hard to find any input other than be patient and willing to travel?

What is sailing a boat this size like? Under normal conditions is it a dry or wet ride on a Norsea 27 with a Bimini. I have had years of cold and wet rides looking for more of a dry ride now. I own a top of the line dry suit and hope it would not be needed in this boat, would it? I understand conditions change! I deal with trees falling, rocks moving and water changes in my boating. Average day coastal cruising not 10' seas in the rain.

With out an AC how hot is it sleeping in the FL keys or Bahamas in a boat? I would think just about unbearable, I hope I am wrong!

Any input on day charter work on a boat this size on the Tennessee River?

The Nor'sea was sold factory finished or as a kit. I found a kit which is a hull,deck,mast and rudder with trailer for sell pretty cheap. To complete the boat myself seems overwhelming, how hard end expensive would this be? If I spend 20k on a boat and have to redo the interior myself this may be the best option or is it?

What about the sailing experience do you enjoy? Besides cost and sea sickness what are the negatives?

How dangerous is costal and offshore sailing in this boat? Are we talking class II or V here?

I would like to experience sailing but don't want to drop a grand on a rental or pay top dollar instruction. I may be open to barter instruction/ boating experiences. Any one ever what to experience white water rafting or kayaking? If you offered a sweet enough deal I would pay my friend Joe to join us. Have you ever been instructed by a Olympic Gold Medalist?

When I look at myself in the mirror there is no doubt I see a boater. There is some doubt if I see a yachtsman or not. I would like to see it but I am not a rich man. So what will it take $ wise to be a yachtsman and what is so great about it?

Thank you and lets go boating! In a raft, kayak or yacht, it's all fun!
Eric
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Old 15-03-2010, 11:45   #2
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Hi, Eric, and welcome to CF! That has to be a record for intro posts! Nicely done, and thanks for sharing it with us. I used to enjoy a bit of whitewater canoeing and kayaking in my younger days, and did a raft trip on the Ocoee once, too. Great fun!

The Norsea 27 is a well-regarded boat with a lot of good features for what you want to do. I'm sure you'll get a lot of input here. In the meantime, you can find a lot of information in our archives by using the custom Google search feature, linked in my signature line.

All the best...
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Old 15-03-2010, 12:23   #3
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WOw!...Lots of questions and I ditto huds sentiments.

I just have one question for you...Are you ready to settle down? Part of you seems to say yes the other part no..

You want a new challange yet you want to stay dry...Hang gliding perhaps?...

You seem better fitted to a Mumm 30 then the Norsea 27 but thats just prception on my part...I dont see you content a 5 knots but wanting 15+

Welcome aboard...glad you found us..

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Old 15-03-2010, 15:23   #4
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We bought a power away package Westsail 32. It had the engine and fuel tanks installed and the cap rail. Other than that it was a huge FRP bath tub. When I unscrewed the temporary plywood companionway cover and looked below, my first thought was, 'My God, what have you gotten yourelf into!!!"

A year later of 12/7/52 work, we launched our boat. We did all the rough in and finish installation, wiring, plumbing, finishing, rigging, etc. We hired out the teak main hatch, door and drawer construction but did all the installation and other work ourselves.

It was a great experience but one I wouldn't want to repeat. Our intention was to go sailing but we wasted a years sailing in the construction process. Also shortened a few fingers in a moment of inattention on the table saw. If you are going to build a boat, you have to be totally commited and willing to forego almost all other things to get the boat done. We built our boat in a do it yourself boat yard filled with partially completed boats, mostly on there 2nd or 3rd owner. We went back to the yard 5 years after we left for SoPac. Only one other boat had launched in the intervening years. Building a boat as a part time avocation is a labor that often stretches into decades. I'm constantly seeing partially finished boats coming on the market because the builder has died or health has deteriorated to the point they have to give up their dream. A broken marriage is also a frequent casualty.

As far as saving money, we could have bought a factory finished W32 for $25,000 and fitted it out for another $10-$15,000. Three months after we started construction on our boat, we had more than that in the boat and it was still a long way from completion. In the ensuing years, price of materials and fittings has gone up a bit. We bought 1st quality teak for $3 a board foot. I just boughtg a piece of 2x8 teak for a project on my current boat, it was $27.50 a board foot. Inflation has had less of an effect on hardware but not a whole lot less. I'd expect that it wouldn't be hard to make a 6 figure NS 27.

The NorSea 27 is a smaller boat but not by a whole lot than the W32. I'd expect you'd have at least 4/5th of the time and money to get an NS27 launched. Don't mean to pop your balloon, but building a boat is a BIG undertaking. Don't get into it without a thorough understanding of he immensity of the task.

If money is a problem in getting the boat big enough for you, I'd look at an older boat that has been neglected. In todays economic world, these boats are almost worthless. I've seen 1970's boats in the 30'-35' range sell for under $10,000 and some even larger go for close to these prices. Most of these boats were usable in their current condition so you could at least go sailing if the refit starts wearing on you. Some were even in very good condition once you washed away the effects of disuse and neglect. I wouldn't expect to save a lot of money in the long run if you want all the latest toys and whistles, but you could probably add self steering and an epirb and start exploring almost immediately.

Good luck in your search. Just don't get your self into something that buries your dream.
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Old 15-03-2010, 16:52   #5
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Given your a thrill seeker who enjoys water sports and is now interested in sailing you may consider taking up racing Hobies. The larger, newer boats are extremely fast and thrilling. Its an absolute blast reaching at well over 20 knots. I used to race my Hobie 18. You can buy used Hobies for a few thousand dollars which are still plenty thrilling.

Do a Google search for the local Hobie fleet, call the fleet president and ask questions. Go to a regatta and see if you can hitch a ride. Sometimes guys are looking for crew. Some might offer to give you a thrill ride before or between races. This will give you a good feel for racing small fast catamarans.

Also, you have to try sailboarding. You start out in light airs to get the hang of it. After you become better, you can sail in higher and higher winds. As the wind increases so does your speed. You will get the point where jumping waves at well over 20 knots is easy. I built my own board when I was a teenager...the technology has changed radically since I last windsurfed....when it was called windsurfing...

Kite boarding...I don't know. I have never tried so I can't speak from experience but the people who do it seem like they are always really struggling. I like watching them out on the SF Bay...they can get some MAJOR air with those boards.

Those are the three sailing extreme sports. Have fun with it.
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Old 15-03-2010, 18:39   #6
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Hi Eric. According to an above post, your intro set a record. So I thought I might as well go on and see if I can set another. This is my first post on this forum, and I guess I might just step into the Besserwisser role I'm comfy with. :-D Actually I read your post to get a feel for what level of presentation I should make. I guess I ran into the highest hurdle first. Still, as I'm far from new to sailing, I think I may be able to say something you may find useful. And then I'll go on to making my own presentation thread (but less wordy than what I write now)...

First. Congratulations on discovering a beautiful hobby, or way of life, or addictive drug, depending on how far it has evolved in you. Most likely you will end up in the last of the categories sooner than you'd expect. I got to that 11 years old (38 years ago), and I still love it endlessly.

I will not try to answer all of your questions, and the ones I address, I'll mostly not answer fully. Many of them are rather big topics, and deserve their own threads to give you the info you search. What I will try to do, is illuminate the essential questions you need to answer, and point a few fingers in possibly useful directions.

OK. The first big thing here is what do you want from sailing? You partly answer this yourself, but this is a typical trick question. True answers quite often become wrong very quickly as your familiarity with them grows. My impression is that you enjoyed the Hobie Cats for the playful fun of it and for making you laugh out loud. The other things you do, indicate that this is generally an important aspect of why you choose the things you do. You're probably a rather energetic fun seeking guy. This forum is dedicated to cruising, which is an absolutely wonderful thing, but is is a totally different thing than the play that woke up your fascination for sailing. I strongly identify with the side that showed you "the force". :-) I also have crossed the Atlantic and cruised the weirdest of places and love that too.

I think you should consider if you maybe should do one step at a time. By that I don't mean that cruising is on a higher level than dinghies, but that you should follow the obsession you already have and let other related ones grow on you. And cruising is one that will do so. This sequential way of approaching sailing will have several benefits. The most important one is that you really learn the art of handling sailing vessels the exact right way. Small craft that can toss you into the drink, have an extremely much better ability to teach your backbone how to do the thing intuitively. Bigger boats will learn you other stuff better, but that real hands-on physical KNOWING why the boat behaves as it does, can ONLY be learned on dinghies. (Small cats are of course dinghies as well). In a dinghy you learn in one day what a slightly bigger boat teaches you in a year. I'm also a fairly accomplished racer, and I've done that as a profession: I claim there has never been a profoundly good sailor/racer that has not extensively sailed dinghies. Some get offended, but that doesn't change my view on this. Learning the art of sailing as I recommend, is probably very close to how you got good at white water stuff.

So the Nor'ship 27. I have never sailed one, but have sailed resembling ones. It looks quite much like the traditional small wooden boats from the North Sea (south west) coast of Norway. Now though, they have mostly been motorised. Maybe the designer found inspiration there, and the name indicates some too...? Anyway, it should be a very reliable and, for its small size, fairly comfy cruiser. Looks nice too. It will be capable of crossing proper oceans and handling real bad weather safely, but it will take time and be rather wet and bouncy. Maintenance costs for a reasonably well kept one should be quite cheap. It's a sailboat, so the engine should preferably not have too many hours on it...? Keeping real big boats, or doing serious racing, will cost you a LOT. A small cruiser like this is very manageable. The trailerable feature is in my opinion a very good thing. It lets you go to different places to explore them without the struggle of going there very slowly before you can spend your hard earned spare time pleasurably. And the big BUT is: This boat is probably a real winner in what it does, but sailing this boat will give you absolutely zero playfulness. Given what I said above, you get my drift.

I think my main points have been presented. I'll just jump through a couple more:
Build your own boat? I have designed and built racing boats, and I will also build long distance cruisers, but quite different from the normal. That's my reason for building. Can't be bought. Generally when people ask, my recommendation is this: If you want to build something, for the pleasure of building and creating, a boat is a good thing to build. If you want to have a boat, buy one! The hours you spend building will never reflect the actual savings, nor be worth the time lost from your loved ones and other things you like. Also the finished boat will in 99% of the cases be an obvious home built boat that is not the beauty you imagined and is almost impossible to sell at a reasonable price. It really IS possibel to achieve the opposite of what I say here, but then you need to really know what you do. You need to be as good as a pro builder or better.

Creature comforts. :-) Sailing is not comfortable. Sorry, but that's just it. Still the differences between types of sailing, places you sail, boats you sail and the style of sailing, is HUGE. The Nor'ship27 offshore in a blow is pretty close to the worst you can get, comfort wise. And sleeping inside in calm but hot climate with no AC can be rather bad , but not quite as unbearable as one might fear. Much of the hull is immersed in the sea, which will rarely be above 27 degrees even in the Keys etc. The air inside the boat will be slightly cooled by this, but expect just a slight improvement. If it's slightly windy there is no problem. You can use wind ducts etc to move the air inside. Also sleeping outside is very nice, provided you are somewhere without mosquitoes... :-D

I mostly sail fast multihulls of different types, but have sailed all kinds of other boats too. For sailing in relative comfort, there is no way around moving into cats. And the difference is astonishing. The comfort I speak about is not at all related to space (which the also have MUCH more of) or equipment and luxury (which the tend to have too), but there are two very notable differences.
1 Monos and cats move very differently. Monos heel over (a lot) and the heel varies much. It's bow will slam into waves and the pitching movement will for most boats be quite much more than the actual waves the boat is crossing. Monos tend to act like pendulums. This is especially bad when there are waves but no wind to give a stabilising pressure on the rig. Cats have quicker more jerky movements, but just slightly. Their heel vary very little. They pitch much less and tend to even out or contour the actual wave patterns.
2 A mono is heavy and a substantial part of it is under the water surface. Moving in a chop or heavy seas, it will cut through waves and particularly small boats will be in a constant heavy sea spray. Inside it is called "below decks", but may also be called "in the cellar". Light comes in through hatches in the deck or small areas of glass well above your line of sight when seated. At best, you see the sky. Cats are a totally different beast at this. Even down in the hulls, you're higher up. More important: When you sail the boat and most of the other time you're on the boat, you spend on the bridge deck. This may or may be covered but will either way be much drier than the cockpit of a mono. If inside the bridgedeck cabin, there will be a generous view in most directions and plenty of light and air.
The effect of these two profound differences, is that sailing a cat especially to windward, is very much less tiresome. Quite often I've sailed a short day between harbours, having a very nice cruise, dinner with wine and all aboard, also totally non sailors, enjoying the beautiful day. Arriving in the harbour friends from the last harbour that left at dawn have just arrived and are totally fatigued by the "horribly strong wind and big waves". Truly two different worlds. I will never again go long distance cruising on a mono...

Well. Now I have said the essentials of what I thought while reading your post, I've declared my religion (multihulls :-) and I may have set several new records for first posts on this forum. I hope this is decently readable, as I haven't read through it, and as my native language isn't English...

Welcome to the beautiful world of wind Eric, and good luck at finding your path towards unavoidable fanaticism. :-D

Stein
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Old 16-03-2010, 06:10   #7
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Thanks

Thank you all for the input! I just got sec, sorry can't write another book today! About to go to the Tellico River and run some small waterfalls and some run rapids.

In sailing I hope it's not an extreme activity. My wife goes kayaking some times with me and I ponder when I worry about her why in the hell I got her in to it. If she gets hurt or worse how will I fell. when I have kids will I get them in to this?? I love just sitting and enjoying my view at my mountain home.

Got to run
Thanks!!
Eric
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Old 17-03-2010, 10:50   #8
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Hud, I am glad you enjoyed the white water in my neck of the woods! I tried the Google search feature and got an error. As for the record I assume it's for number of questions. Sorry! There is a lot going through my head. If I do this it will be a lot of money for me.

Stillraining, I love the name! I am not looking for speed but a blue water cruiser that I can trailer/ no slip and can work from in my back yard. Shallow draft single keel/protected rudder with max amount of room inside. As for the video that is bad ass! If I were rich I would have both! Thanks for the link!

Roverhi Hate to hear about the fingers! Wow! You gave me a lot to think about. Here is a Dumb question. "we could have bought a factory finished W32 for $25,000 and fitted it out for another $10-$15,000." what does fitted it out mean? I assume customize to your needs including buying new equipment. Is this a must for my current needs or just personal preference? I am use to ruffing it. Not a wood expert but I don't consider my self a person that needs 1st quality teek.

Stein, Thank you for your time! 1st post wow!
"The first big thing here is what do you want from sailing? " You sound Like me with my students asking about kayaking! I will compare the two cat experiences. solo it the small wave I go a bit of adrenaline like kayaking. I flipped it more in an hour than my 6 yr professional history of white water rafting! Honestly like I think jumping out of a plane would be, it would get lame in a real hurry for the need of adrenaline. If there were always a group of sharks in a feeding frenzy when you flipped it would be like white water.

In the big cat I took the wife, mother, sister and niece out. Did not want to flip rather have a memorable positive experience. That would not wear out! Here is my dream.. I hope that my family and I both would enjoy this. My mother is retiring for teaching and hopes to spent a lot of time with me. It would be a lot more fun for me for the two of us to spend some time cruising than sit on my couch for a few weeks together. Not sure if she would enjoy this or not, kind of why I am here! I would start with a day or two before departing for a month adventure! My wife I would sail with most is a tough, ruffing it girl. She works from an internet based company and is in upper management. If she wants to work from home or a boat for a while they will hook her up. We own our dream home with a beautiful mountain view. I can not vacation in the mountain because why pay money for some thing not as nice as home! I would like a way to vacation in the coastal areas that would not cost an arm in leg. IN MY DREAM a sailboat is like an RV with something fun to do included. I would also hope to keep it until the wife and I retire and can travel the world. One main reason I am sold on the Norsea.

As for the small craft to learn in the wife and I have beed talking about it. The Tenn. River is close but wind conditions are not the best I would only imagine. If I am going to have to travel with it it would be nice to be able to sleep in it.

Info on the Norsea is exactly my goal from the trailer to safe offshore. I wish I had my 1st kayak! If I buy a boat I want to keep it a long time! I would like to be able to sail it around the world MANY years down the road!

For multi hulls... trailer able is goal #1 and blue water #2 and the budget is what it is. Are there any boats that would work? I would love a look!

As for building the boat I do not know what to say. Creating is very much one of my talents. Drawing, painting, stone masony and sculpting in stone is my specialties. would I enjoy it? If I had the tools and know how(even from books) YES!

If any one cares to see my creations check this out! I do sell a bit of art and I can carve/sculpt in stone or the wood of your choice!
http://www.myspace.com/chattanoogastonescape

Thank you again! Your English is much better than mine and it's my only language!

Thank you all!
Eric
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Old 17-03-2010, 12:42   #9
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If you want a go ANYWHERE trailerable boat, there probably is no better one than the NorSea 27. Lyle Hess was the best designer of small heavy displacement boats and his designs, like the BCC and the Pardey's boats, are legendary. I just wanted to be sure you knew what you were getting yourself into in finishing one off. With used ones available under $30,000, I can't see how anyone could finish one off for less money NOT counting your labor. Add $6,000 for a small diesel, $4,000 for sails, $2,000 for electronics, $1,000 for ground tackle, $2,000 for winches, and on and on. You'll need a big pickup to tow the boat as well as a hefty trailer. Do you have a 3/4 ton pickup already and does the boat come with a solid trailer capable of safe long distance towing?? Not wanting to rain on your parade, just make sure you've got your eyes open. We did it at your age, don't regret it, but it would have been cheaper and easier to go another route.

Teak is expensive but it's the only wood I'd use where it will be exposed to weather. There is no other wood that stands up to the elements without maintenance. For the interior, good old Phillipine Mahogany is still the wood of choice and almost any hardwood will work as well. Some things you just can't cut corners on. Judging by your sculpture, you definitely have the skills required to build the boat. It would be time and materials that I'd be concerned about.

New boats usually come stripped. You've got to supply winches, sails, running rigging, galley equipment, ground tackle, safety equipment, etc. Getting a boat ready for long distance sailing is expensive. If you buy a used boat, much of the equipment may be included. Still, don't underestimate the cost of fitting out even a well equipped used boat. Fortunately, in a used boat, you can spread the expenditures out over time.

If it was me, I'd look at a smaller trailerable boat for a starter. If you can find one, check out the South Coast line. They make a range of small, well constructed vessels that are suitable for coastal cruising. They are more responsive, lighter and more easily trailered than the NorSea. It would be a good boat to get your feet wet on and not a lot of money required. If you get the bug, selling the boat and moving up would be relatively painless.

Anyhow, you've got a great idea. The NorSea is excellent for what you are trying to accomplish.
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Old 17-03-2010, 14:16   #10
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Sounds like you are and extreme sports person.. tell you something, you aint going to be happy if you dont have something to kick ass with...
I started sailing after I broke both wrists and my ankle in a bicycle pile-up.. 8 of us were in a sprint to the finish when the lead guy went down and took all of us with him.. Thus ended my bicycle racing...
Like yourself, I'm an extreme person and I live live on the edge.. and always felt, if your not on the edge, your taking up to much room......
Mono Hulls are fast but cats are faster and the tri-s will boggel the mind..
If I were in your position, Id check out the "P-38s" or a "Prindle"
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Old 19-03-2010, 08:01   #11
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roverhi, Thanks again! I am starting to think not on the build. I got a truck hope to get 16mpg in tow. No trailer yet some boats come with.
"South Coast line"I was not familiar but I have read a lot about Carl Alberg. An Alberg 30 would be my 2nd choice to Nor'sea. The South Coast look nice for the size and are cheap. I am going to think about that. I also saw a compac 23 with trailer for 5k I liked. I am not in a hurry to buy. I am about to get busy working on the river.

Randy or3, I really hate to hear abut the wreck that ended your racing! I can relate with that much more than I like. I was a paid firefighter in training in 97. I had a muscle strain while running and a blood clot formed. I had more than 6 pulmonary emboli and almost died. This did cost me my job. I am on a blood thinning medication and will be for life. (Kayaking is very dangerous for me because of the medication. I am worried about a HEAD INJURY!) I have daily swelling in my legs due to residual clot and veinus problems. I was given a 80% volcational disibility to the body as a whole. This is unaccurete today but I will never be near what I was. For reasons I do not know employers since my injury will not touch me with a 10' pole even though I have a B.S. degree! I did recieve a less than 6 figure workmans comp one time only claim. I wasted most on an SUV and the stock market. I did buy one nice toy which is about to go up for sale for my boat. This toy appriciaed 300% in value since my injury/ I bought it. :-)

As for having some thing to kick ass with... I am not going to stop kayaking or kicking ass! I also cave/spelunk(what a dumb word!) and snowboard and have enough adrenaline sports. Like yen and yang, I need some more yang! I wish I was rich, I do like the speed of the tri hull. A roomy, trailerable boat that I can afford is my goal. I looked at the corsair f 24. For a weekend boat that would be bad ass! It looks small inside compaired to the Nor'sea 27. I would rather have more room and go real slow. I wish I could have both! I looked for P-38s. I only found planes and a large motor yacht. Looks like prindle is a nice hobie?? Is this correct or did I not find your suggestions? Thanks and do hate to hear about the wreck!
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Old 19-03-2010, 08:23   #12
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I need a get away from lifes frustrations. Just now some ass hole called from 1-731-599-4487 asking for donations for disabled firefighters. I told him I am a disabled firefighter and need info on accistance rather than giving him money. He hung up on me!
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Old 19-03-2010, 08:26   #13
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I just wanted to make sure it is clear that although this forums primary emphasis is on cruising sailboats, it certainly is not limited to this subject. Most any subject that relates to water craft of all types and the oceans is fair game. We also have an Off Topic category, but we highly encourage members to post topics that relate somehow back to boats.
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Old 19-03-2010, 11:48   #14
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Compacs are nice trailerable boats. If you decide to go smaller, they would be a good choice.

Too bad about your health problems though it sounds like you are dealing with them. There is a friend of my fathers who has had serious heart problems and has been on coumadin forever. It's not a take and forget drug.

Sometimes we just have to slow down and enjoy the quieter things in life. In my younger days, was a Navy Jet Pilot, owned a string of Porsches, raced bicycles, and puttered around with motorcycles. Got back into sailing and the extreme thrill hobbies just melted away. Something about sailing that made all that dangerous stuff irrelavant. Actually sort of irrelavant as I got into mountain biking until two separated shoulders curbed my enthusiasm.
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Old 19-03-2010, 14:36   #15
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David, Thanks for the heads up! I am not sure yet is sailing is or me. It is off subject things like the fact I am going to be on coumadin for life that makes me think possibly so. I have a lot of 1st time kayakers/students ask me about boats. They have to sell me on why they need one before I will recommend one. Most people don't they just got a dumb idea like, lets go white water kayaking and spend some money on gear. It is usually not a fit for them for one of many reasons. In the end a lot people pay me to show them why kayaking is not for them. It is a fit for some and those we really enjoy. I want you to do the same.

roverhi, thanks bro! "Sometimes we just have to slow down and enjoy the quieter things in life. In my younger days, was a Navy Jet Pilot, owned a string of Porsches, raced bicycles, and puttered around with motorcycles. Got back into sailing and the extreme thrill hobbies just melted away. Something about sailing that made all that dangerous stuff irrelavant."

This is what I want to hear! What about sailing "made all that dangerous stuff irrelavant." ? For example I tell my students. In white water I go to some very remote and beautiful places. Some are very close to city's but due to the gorge it is very remote. I never see any one unless they are in a white water boat while in these places. My friends and I are a team. I trust them with my life and they fell the same. It is very challenging, dangerous and almost always in a beautiful place. It is as much about exploring as the adrenaline.

A compac or southern coast would be a learner boat. I really like the Norsea! I like the Falmouth Cutter too but the 27' has more room.

I would like more info on how many could day sail on this boat. I would like to be able to take the family out. We are starting annual Mobile Bay family vacations.

Thanks every one!
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