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Old 15-09-2004, 21:36   #1
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Hello from Hong Kong

Hello to all the sailors
I am new here and have no experience in boats or sailing. My wife and me plan to retire in 5-7 years; buy a boat take our two daughters and cruise around the world.
It seams that there is so much to learn that I really don’t know where to start. I hope this forum can be helpful
A friend of mine suggested me to buy Tom Colvin’s “Gazzele”, which made in India.

http://www.kondosyokai.com/gazelle/

Since it is built in India, the price is cheap compare to other new boats. It also looks suitable for a family’s cruise. But the beam looks to narrow (11’) and the displacement looks to light – only 18,168 lbs for a steel boat, maybe it because the displacement is for a light boat. I really don’t understand.
Any thoughts about this boat?

Also, since I still have few years until that BIG day, any ideas of what to study and where to begin? I’ll appreciate any help.

Thanks,
Yona
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Old 16-09-2004, 05:17   #2
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Gazelle

The “Gazelle” appears (to me) to be a real abortion - I wouldn’t even consider such a boat (for any purposes). My reasons are legion.
OMHO
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Old 16-09-2004, 05:43   #3
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Why wouldn't you consider it? Can you please name at least some of your reasons?

Thanks
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Old 16-09-2004, 10:29   #4
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A few negatives:
1. Junk rig. Not a good choice for a “newbie” (or anyone?)
2. Steel mast, & galvanized steel rigging wire. A couple of poor quality construction details that may tell the tale on why it;’s cost-competitive.
3. Cotton sails.
4. intuition ...
Suggest you look at some good used (“modern”) boats.
Search JeffH’s posting (& others) for guidance - he offers some great advice.
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Old 16-09-2004, 14:57   #5
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No Mate, just because it is built in India doesn't make it cheap. This thing looks like it's built cheap to be cheap.
Honest, if I was in your shoes (and I was not so long ago) You need a proven vessel. Look for a Second hand vessel that has returned from world crusiing. It will have everything you need. Most mistakes are made with people thinking that the Boat is the expensive hurdle. Wrong. Fitting a vessel out for world cruising is the expensive part. You are best to find a vessel with all the required gear. Much much cheaper than buying it afterward.
As Gord has stated, there are many things that stick out like sore thumbs on this one. I would indeed be very very VERY careful about buying something like this. I can see this as being an expensive maintanance nightmare in a few years.
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Old 16-09-2004, 22:33   #6
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I feel real bad that you have had all these negatives. If I can just incourage you to not let go of the dream. There are many very sound boats to be had out there. Remember one important point. I put it at the top of my list of points.

It is far easier to buy a boat than sell a boat.

Keep posting here and keep the dream
Regards,
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Old 17-09-2004, 03:56   #7
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Gord, Wheels, thank you both for your replies.
I am really OK with getting these negative replies about “Gazelle”. I am here to learn. It will be a mistake to fall in love with a specific boat and especially in such an early stage. Only month ago I didn’t even know the different between a sailboat and a powerboat
I’ll do some more reading and also take your advice and look for Jeff’s posts. Then I’ll probably come back with some more questions.

Yona
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Old 17-09-2004, 21:13   #8
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Good on ya mate. Keep asking questions. You aren't the only one that learns when you ask a question.
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Old 18-09-2004, 07:45   #9
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first of all learn to sail. im sure there are sailing schools around. than charter different boats ie cats monohulls to get a feel for the sea and what you are comfortable with . it took me 30 years of playing with boats to learn what was ideal for me....at least for now jt
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Old 26-09-2004, 12:02   #10
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Exclamation Your a lucky man, Yona

You came to a site that will keep you on the straight and narrow.
Follow the advice here. These are people of expertise. Get some lessons and some time out on the water, smooth and rough. And take along the family after time. Some people can not handle the sea! It's best to know now, not after you have made a large investment........................_/)
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Old 30-11-2004, 08:16   #11
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newbie

newbie, that's me...
:-)

After 9.000 miles and 16 months at sea you still learn new things.
The nice part of living on land is that you have a good internetconnection, use it !

If you look at a boat to cruise the world, look at the sites of these people. Look who has been out there, and in what kind of ship they did/do that.
There are a lot of vessels that are up to the job, but I agree on what's been said earlier; the most expensive part is not the boat, but it's gear. And another one, looks don't count, designs neigther.

I hope you can do something with this advice, and we may see each other some day (we're coming your way....).
:-)

John
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Old 05-12-2004, 05:20   #12
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John,
I visited your site before (via the link from cruisenews.net). And I will be happy to follow your journey, just don't forget to update the English section
Since my last post, I did quite a lot of reading but didn't find the time to go on a boat. There is a yacht club just 10 min of walking from my home. I know that they are looking for crew in Saturdays. But since my wife works then, I have to be the babysitter. Anyway our first priority now is to build the cruising kitty - without it, our cruising dream will never come true.
Maybe the solution will be to buy the boat earlier, move aboard and by that gaining some experience before we leave for good. Any thoughts?
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Old 04-04-2005, 00:45   #13
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My first sailing

Last Saturday I had my first sailing experience. I joined as a crew to Impala 28’ racing. As a newbie, I didn’t do much – just puling and releasing the line for the main (don’t know what you sailors call it). I thought it could be a good way (and free) to study sailing. But I was disappointed.
First, there is no time to learn. All the other crewmembers are too busy with the race to explain anything.
Second, cursing is much more than just sailing – anchoring, navigation, mechanics etc… – you can’t study all this in a 2 hours sailing.
Third, it is not fun. Don’t want to insult any one here, but I can’t see the fun in circling few buoys inside a harbor. Maybe it is because I am not a competitive guy. Who cares if we got first or last? I just wanted to enjoy the water and relax.

So now I think that free is not always the best way to go, and I’ll need to put some money here. I think of buying a small and cheap boat (less than 6K) - something that I can use in the next few years until I’ll buy THE boat. It should be big enough to accommodate the whole family (2+2) for one or two nights (some of us can sleep on the duck with sleeping bags).

I will keep you update, and again I will be happy to hear your thought about my plan or suggestions for a suitable boat.

Thanks,
Yona
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Old 06-04-2005, 13:41   #14
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Racing is NOT a good way to learn the gentle art of Sailing. Unless you are reaaallly into sailing and have an aggressive competitive personality, DON'T go racing. I took up racing, (one season) about 15years ago. I had a very stressful job and thought a nice sail around the harbour in the evenings in the "twilight series" would be a good end to a hard day. Mate was I wrong. I would come home a Nervouse wreck. Mostly because I was new to Sailing big boats,(30 to 60ft). New to sailing with other boats in close proxcimity, and that was sheer hell for me, when we would all end up rounding the last mark onto the finish line after a handicap start. I couldn't believe these owners would play dodgem cars with their beautiful boats. And then the real nice skippers that I knew became someone totaly different for the duration of the race, yelling and swearing at everyone.
Nup! not a good thing for a newbie to wet his.her feet on for the first time in my opinion.
Ask the person you sailed with if you could go for a lovely relaxing sail one afternoon evening and enjoy a "Sunset over the Yard Arm" in the process. That will change you view.
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Old 12-04-2005, 22:09   #15
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Racing can improve your sailing skills, but I have to agree, it is a horrible way to learn to sail. Depending on the type of racing, harbor, moderate, or long distance, you will get varying amounts of instruction. I think the 2 hour harbor type racing is the worse. There is just no time, and all the seconds count. On some of the longer distance races there is much more time to learn. To get to understand points of sail, tactics, sail trim and the like.

I have to agree, again with Alan, join a sailing/yacht club. Folks are always looking for help in going places and most of the fun is having company. You'll learn a lot more about what cruising is about might even learn to sail!

Good luck.

Keith
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