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Old 27-08-2006, 20:16   #1
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Hello from Georgia

New to this forum...I have never been sailing before, but am currently searching for sailing lessons offered in coastal Georgia. I hope to one day be able to fulfill this dream of mine...would love to hear from anyone that started sailing a little later in life with no prior experience. I am 36 years old and have put off many aspirations until my children have gotten a little older. Any responses will be appreciated.
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Old 27-08-2006, 20:31   #2
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welcome aboard Jenny. It is never too late to pursue a dream, and 36 is certainly not too late to learn how to sail. Go for it! I cannot offer any specific advice because I am on the other side fo the world, but check the phone book for details of local yacht clubs, and phone them and ask about courses for novice sailors. Alos, try your local community colleges and adult education facilities. Also, if you happen to live near a yacht club, there are, in the summer, usually, mid-week low-key "twilight" races where a novice can often get a crew spot. Good luck.
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Old 28-08-2006, 04:35   #3
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Though I had done a bit of sailing in "board boats" such as Sunfish when young, I didn't really start sailing till some 40 years later. So don't feel you are in any way coming too late to the game. Weyalan had some good points that should get you going in the right direction.

Best of luck,
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Old 28-08-2006, 15:25   #4
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I wouldn't waste money on sailing lessons. I'd buy an 8' sailing dinghy and a basic sailing book then go out and do it on the nearest puddle. You will learn everything you need to know about actually sailing very quickly and a whole host of previously inaccessable areas will open up to you. The boat can be thrown in the back of an SUV or on a roof rack so not a problem to get to water. Later, it can become the tender for your yacht, if you love sailing that much. If you don't want to go further, you might be able to sell it for a profit. You may even find your kids get into it, too. As you get more knowledgable your reading level should go up and you'll pick up the knowledge painlessly.

Typically, there are a lot of boat owners who are would love someone as crew. They would be glad to teach you just to have someone along. Check the local marinas and marine stores, post messages, and read local sailing publication's classifieds, if there are any, for crew wanted.

I started sailing at a young age but I've been totally self taught. Cleaned out my savings, bought a Sailfish do it your self kit with no building or sailing experience when I was 12 and never looked back. Don't know what inspired me other than "Robinson Crusoe" as there were no sailboats or sailors anywhere near me in central Michigan and certainly none on the small lake we lived on. Just knew I'd love sailing and did what I needed to do to make the reality. It's taken me up and down and both coasts and to the South Pacific.

Aloha
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Old 28-08-2006, 16:13   #5
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I sail out of St. Simons and Jacksonville. Email me and you can crew sometime. A good way to learn.
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Old 05-09-2006, 21:30   #6
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Hello Jenny,
I am from Mobile, Al. I learned to sail by going to a local yacht club. They are always looking for crew. This is a good way to get involved and meet boating people. I learned very fast and bought a Pearson 26. Sailing is very relaxing on the bay and you don't have the noise of a loud motor!
Good luck. I have a brother that went to Emory University, what part of Georgia are you from?
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Old 05-09-2006, 22:57   #7
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Hi Jenny, I just joined this board today too. I am like you just getting started in realizing my dream as my kids are now older. I have had no prior experience ,except for a US Sailing Course a year ago. So far the experience has been fantastic and I can't wait to get more time on the water in the near future.
Good luck with your quest.
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Old 06-09-2006, 12:18   #8
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Aloha Jenny,
Welcome aboard! To get an idea of how to sail get a copy of "Start Sailing Right." RoverHI stated that just getting a small dinghy is the key to learning. I will just say, "That's one way to do it." If you don't want to keep making the same mistakes over and over again then a short basic sailing course in a safe environment is a quicker and more efficient way to learn. Sailing in a small dinghy will sharpen your skills once you have the basics.
Kind Regards,
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Old 07-09-2006, 03:12   #9
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Jenny, the advice about contacting other sailors and crewing for them is very sound. Contact a local yacht club or find a bar where sailors go for a drink after a day's sail is a good place to start. They usually have a notice board where you can put a card with your details on and someone will call you. Learning this way you will get differing views on how people tackle situations and you can assess these and work out which one you think will work for you. Skippers are always looking for crew who are willing to learn as enthusiasm with little knowledge is sometimes better than lots of experience. Generally us crusty old salts enjoy passing on our knowledge and it gives us a chance to bore someone new with our salty sea stories!

Good luck, I'm sure that you will enjoy every minute of your sailing.

36? A mere slip of a girl
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Old 07-09-2006, 17:05   #10
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Aloha Again Jenny,
Yes to all who suggested that you find someone to crew for but be very careful about which skipper and what boat you choose. There are some skippers who you shouldn't be learning bad habits from. Local Sailing and Yacht Clubs can recommend reputable skippers.
A good skipper will appreciate someone with some basic knowledge so my original suggestion about a basic sailing course still applies.
Kind Regards, JohnL
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Old 09-09-2006, 06:45   #11
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Depending upon your risk-aversion quotient, a bar may not be the best environment in which to search out a sailing mentor. Notwithstanding, depending upon your level extroversion, it may be exactly the place.

"... the advice about contacting other sailors and crewing for them is very sound. Contact a local yacht club or find a bar where sailors go for a drink after a day's sail is a good place to start ..."
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Old 09-09-2006, 09:31   #12
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Jenny, email me. Lets go sailing soon. The weather is great. Where are you located? We can meet up for the drive to Jacksonville. I sail mostly Sunday and Mondays, so email when you are ready. David
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Old 09-09-2006, 22:45   #13
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Just wanted to thank everyone for your kind responses. Your advice has been much appreciated.
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