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Old 28-09-2005, 16:41   #16
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i agree with kai nui. while some of us older dogs on this site take heat from time to time for being "negative" on new adventures taken on by the inexperienced - the idea of building a 60 footer from scratch is a big risk. if you buy a used boat, it will definitely cost less than building from scratch, and if things turn to crap, you can sell and get some bucks back. a half built dream will be worth zero. i promise you can put unlimited sweat equity and cash into upgrading a used boat. the cheaper the start price, the more work she will need. you might share some of your guesses on costs if you really want to get a reality check. a 60 foot hole in the water is going to eat a huge amount of dollars. having said that, if you want to build a 60 footer in arizona - give 'em hell. capt. lar
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Old 28-09-2005, 20:05   #17
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Ferro Cement

I have a Hartley 32 that was professionally built in ferro. I am in the process of fitting out, and she is on the hard near my factory.

The hull is very fair, and we have sanded it back in preparation for a 2 pack paint job. After this, she will look like any other boat in the marina.

Ferro gets a lot of unfair raps from people whose only experience has been to see the very poorly build "backyard" boats from the 60's and 70's when the material costs were very cheap, and it seemed nearly everyone was building one. This is also a major contributor to the poor resale prices. Don't get me wrong, I have seen some real shockers, but there are many out there that are pleasing to the eye as well as being good comfortable cruising boats.

A professionally designed and built ferro boat "Helsal" was a regular competitor in offshore yacht races in the 1970's, and always a good performer. Among other acheivements, she won the prestigous offshore races such as Sydney to Hobart, Sydney to Lord Howe Island and Sydney to Mooloolaba. She now has a more comfortable life being a charter vessel in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland coast.

I was looking for a cost effective way to get a decent sized cruising boat, and I came across this ferro project boat; it was built in 1980, and had been in the water for over 20 years with no signs of armature rusting, cracking of cememt, or patching of repairs. I figure that 20 years in the hostile marine environment is a good test, and that build quality problems would have arisen by now.

Working with a ferro hull is not without challenges, but what boat building project is ever as straight forward and easy as you initially thought? All building materials will have advantages and disadvatages.

For me, I am happy with the choice I have made, and I look forward with anticipation to the day when she is wet again.

Regards

Steve
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Old 28-09-2005, 23:02   #18
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I do speak from some personal experience. I bought a 40' Samson Sea Smoke a few years back. We were hauled out with our livaboard, and were not willing to live in a boat yard again.
The boat was home built, but exceptional. I bought it from the builders, who had cruised in Mexico with it for 6 years in the early 80's. I did not like the way it sailed, but that is just my opinion. The hull was fair and sound. The guy I sold it to, started a major refit, that never got done, and the boat is now a live aboard that will never see the sails raised. The only other objection I had to the boat is how it felt below. It just felt cold. Of course we were comparing to our wood boat. The bottom line is, I would have never known what I thought about ferro boats without spending some time on one.
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Old 02-10-2005, 08:49   #19
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Kai Nui,

So that man you sold the boat too. He never finished the refit? Cause it costs too much. Right?

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Kevin
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Old 03-10-2005, 05:18   #20
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I'd back this good suggestion, Kevin...

Quote:
Kai Nui once whispered in the wind:
Kevin, with such an ambitious project in mind, and the resale of ferro boats being what it is, you migh consider buying one out here in Ca, and doing some sailing on it. A 40-50 footer can be had for 15000-25000, sometimes less, and might give you some real perspective. Since you have the kind of time you do, after a year or so of trying out a boat, you can turn it for around the same money you invested, and be much more informed, but no poorer. Or you might even strip it to outfit your project. You can often purchase a ferro boat with a good rig, appliances, engine, and deck equipment for less than the value of the equipment.
I can understand the excitement of the planned project and I've even built a GRP yacht myself and got a lot from that process - but if you've never really cruised before it makes really good sense to purchase a smaller boat and get some sailing experience first as suggested above.

In my humble opinion it will make learning a less painful / expensive process; it will better equip you for any later building plans and possibly most important, you'll be risking far less cash, time and enthusiasm. The last one can go quickest on a really big project........

Good luck - whatever you choose to do

Cheers
JOHN
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Old 03-10-2005, 06:54   #21
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Re: I'd back this good suggestion, Kevin...

[QUOTE]swagman once whispered in the wind:
[B]I can understand the excitement of the planned project and I've even built a GRP yacht myself and got a lot from that process - but if you've never really cruised before it makes really good sense to purchase a smaller boat and get some sailing experience first as suggested above.

Kevin,

John has good point. Try it first. And it's not just the sailing experience. I think you will find that, after a few months of cruising, what you initially thought you wanted in a boat is not what you really want or need in a cruising boat. Case in point, a friend of mine put an engine driven fridge in before cruising because he'd chartered and all the charter boats seemed to have this fridge. After cruising a while he realised that most of the time is spent at anchor and a 12v system would be preferrable to running the engine twice a day. Trying it first in a smaller boat will definitely firm up your wish-list for the next boat!
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Old 03-10-2005, 20:35   #22
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Recommendation Noted !!

Gentlemen,

I have been doing some considerable thinking. I will follow your advice.

But, once I see that, "if" I need a bigger boat. Then I will do so. I will take your advice in consideration.

Thank you for your heart felt advice, guys. I thank you very much.

Regards,

Kevin
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