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Old 30-03-2008, 16:57   #1
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Hello All

Hiya. I'm a 35 year old sailer. I race Hobie 20's with my wife and I'm seriously thinking of getting into cruising and possibly (down the road) owning my own cruiser to eventually sail around the world at some point. Any hits or information you can point me to about what is Minimum required gear and boat specs for cruising around the globe would be much appreciated.

I'm getting through my ASA 101 - 104 this summer and will be ready to bareboat charter by the end of the year. That is step 1 in my dream.

THanks!

-beta
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Old 30-03-2008, 17:15   #2
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Aloha Beta,
Welcome aboard! You are really inviting a whole bunch of opinions. Let's start with the boat. Nearly anything will do but longer keel and heavier will be more comfortable. A longer boat will hold more stuff including fuel and water. I like to think of my limit as 36 even though I currently am working on a 42. I recommend cutter rig, fiberglass hull, diesel engine and aft cockpit. Pick a boat with a quality builder and a good maintenance history. Age doesn't matter. An epirb, liferaft, radar, dinghy and the basics in navigation are pretty much necessary.
That'll give you something to start with and others can chime in with what they think. Some will even suggest catamarans. Pay no attention. LOL
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Old 30-03-2008, 17:24   #3
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Beta,

Welcome!

I sailed a Hobie 16 for 28 years before buying our Island Packet 380. Great way to get the feel of a boat on the water. Poke around the subforums, and you'll see a lot of good advice on boats, cruising, and living your dream.
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Old 30-03-2008, 21:09   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiprJohn View Post
I like to think of my limit as 36 even though I currently am working on a 42. I recommend cutter rig, fiberglass hull, diesel engine and aft cockpit. Pick a boat with a quality builder and a good maintenance history. Age doesn't matter.
JohnL
Any thoughts on some "quality builders with a good maintenance history"? I'm currently looking at Hunter, Jeanneau, & Catalina. Although, none of those offer a Cutter Rig sail plan. Any thoughts on Roller Furlling Mains and Jibs to manage the sail area instead of working a Cutter Rig?

First off I'm looking to identifty a manufacturer and setup that will work for cruising the carribean and/or eventually doing a circumnavigation (years down the road).

Thanks in advance.
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Old 31-03-2008, 07:01   #5
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Hi Betachz,
Welcome. Of the three manufacturers you listed, IMHO the middle one has lots more yachts that have cruised some distances over the years.
Good luck
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Old 31-03-2008, 07:06   #6
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Beta,

I have roller-furling sails on my cutter rig, including mast-furling main. All have performed flawlessly in all conditions up to Force 8+ offshore. Would not part with my cutter rig--perfect for sailing offshore and amongst the islands in the tradewinds.
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Old 31-03-2008, 11:45   #7
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Aloha Beta,
Hud and Swagman own boats built by quality builders. Hans Christian comes to mind. Halberg Rassey is another. Of the 3 you mentioned (not to upset any forum owners) I would put the last two at the marginal level for ocean work and the first one for coastal cruising. Just my opinion. If you are really curious then start looking at what's for sale at marinas and get a broker to show you a few or talk your way aboard some that look salty. Good maintenance is better than age in a boat 5 years or older.
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Old 31-03-2008, 15:21   #8
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Welcome Beta! I bought a coastal cruiser for the interum while I hone my skills and research blue water boats. My current favorite is the Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34 or 37. Check them out. Welcome again.
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Old 01-04-2008, 01:06   #9
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Quote:
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Any thoughts on Roller Furlling Mains and Jibs to manage the sail area instead of working a Cutter Rig?
Years ago during my first life on the water, roller furling was limited to weekend warriors and days sailors. Serious sailor, even cruisers shied away due to cost, reliability, weight and windage. People also were very leery of 'reefing' a headsail by paritally rolling it. Now, with 20 years of technology advancements to take advantage of, rolling furlers seems to be commonplace. I see many postings about boats dealing with heavy weather using roller furlings.
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Old 01-04-2008, 14:41   #10
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Quote:
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My current favorite is the Pacific Seacraft Crealock 34 or 37. Check them out.
I checked out thier website... and although they have a great reputation.. I'm hesitant to buy a boat that is simply "ugly" (don't kill me). I'm a graphic designer by trade and the classic look of boats like this drive me crazy. I'm currently looking into the Hanse 400. That's more my styling. Are there any other manufacturers you know with a more sophisticated design, yet completely sea worth for blue water?

Thanks!
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Old 01-04-2008, 15:00   #11
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Beta, beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but the Crealocks were not primarily designed with a 'classic look' for reasons of esthetics, but rather for reasons of function in a blue water environment. I can't imagine anyone suggesting that a Hanse 400 would be half the boat of a Crealock for a circumnavigation - and this is not merely because they were better constructed.

If you are really into modern design (and currently sail a cat), you can no doubt find something more 'sophisticated' in a multihull. But the narrow beam, low freeboard, cast bronze or stainless portlights and overhangs on the Crealocks are all there for very sound reasons. Regardless of whether you ultimately end up looking at monos or multis for a circumnavigation, I would think that you had best put function before form.


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Old 01-04-2008, 15:09   #12
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Quote:
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If you are really into modern design (and currently sail a cat), you can no doubt find something more 'sophisticated' in a multihull. But the narrow beam, low freeboard, cast bronze or stainless portlights and overhangs on the Crealocks are all there for very sound reasons. Regardless of whether you ultimately end up looking at monos or multis for a circumnavigation, I would think that you had best put function before form. Brad
Well... yeah! Of course form should follow function... that is why I asked the question... Secondly, form is not defined by function in the case of brass fittings etc... they could easily design "non-classic" looking boats with the same function and even the same materials but with a more elegant design inside and out. I was wondering if any manufacturers are doing that these days. Maybe multi-hull is the way to go for me then. It's all the nasty curling wood trim and 1970's interior that really gets me nausious. It's the 21st century... I would think someone is designing boats out there with both form and function in mind. But maybe not.
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Old 01-04-2008, 19:43   #13
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Aloha Beta,
All a matter of taste. You might want to attend a few boat shows with modern (new) boats and see what appeals to you.
I truly can't stand a sea of white molded plastic interior with chrome or polished stainless and much prefer teak and mahogany with bronze ports and fittings. All in what we prefer and that's why there are so many options in the boat world.
Good luck in your search.
JohnL
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Old 01-04-2008, 21:26   #14
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so so true. Yeah I'm planning on looking around for quite a while before deciding on anything. THanks for all the advise.
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