Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 07-11-2015, 08:47   #16
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,395
Images: 34
Re: ...better late than never

So have you signed up in the Hans Christian Owners Association yet? You should, you don't need a boat to join. And search Hans Christian here, there are a bunch of posts about them. When that right 33 comes along, you won't need to get a survey, you'll already know more than most surveyors!
__________________

__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 13:29   #17
Registered User
 
NorthernSeaWolf's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: From Coastal BC, currently stuck in a corn field in Godforesaken, IN
Posts: 107
Re: ...better late than never

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
So have you signed up in the Hans Christian Owners Association yet?
Way ahead of you

Thanks!
__________________

__________________
“Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.”
NorthernSeaWolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 00:27   #18
Moderator
 
JPA Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 10,705
Re: ...better late than never

A friend of ours had an HC33, it had a serious weather helm problem. It is something to check out. Also, in case you don't know, there are some people who would not consider a Taiwan built boat, period, due to vagaries in their construction, black iron tanks made inaccessible by furniture, and other indicators. Not to denigrate your desires, but to raise your consciousness: look for boats that have had fuel and water tanks replaced on PO's dollars, no plywood decks[see the sinking of the Rebel Heart], please, and so on.

Ann
__________________
Ann, with Jim, aboard US s/v Insatiable II, in Oz, very long term cruisers
JPA Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 13:19   #19
Registered User
 
NorthernSeaWolf's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: From Coastal BC, currently stuck in a corn field in Godforesaken, IN
Posts: 107
Re: ...better late than never

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
A friend of ours had an HC33, it had a serious weather helm problem. It is something to check out. Also, in case you don't know, there are some people who would not consider a Taiwan built boat, period, due to vagaries in their construction, black iron tanks made inaccessible by furniture, and other indicators. Not to denigrate your desires, but to raise your consciousness: look for boats that have had fuel and water tanks replaced on PO's dollars, no plywood decks[see the sinking of the Rebel Heart], please, and so on.

Ann
I'm surprised to hear you say that, considering it isn't a stated issue and nobody else I've spoken with has mentioned weather helm as an issue on the HC33. It was a big issue with the 38T, but that was largely resolved in 1984 with the Telstar by increasing the lead of the mast.

As far as construction, I have done my research and I am a little particular about the year and designer of my s/v. The HC33 and HC38s I'm looking at are of Hardwood Ives design. Robert Perry was the designer of the HC36 Rebel Heart, and he openly admitted that he was new to Taiwanese boat building industry, and that he neglected to give precise enough instructions to maintain tight quality control. There seemed to be reasonable oversight on Hardwood Ives designed s/v's for the years that I am considering. As far as materials used, tanks, etc...it's going to have to be a vessel by vessel assessment.

I'd like to think I'm not going in with rose colored glasses, blind to the complications that can arise from an older Taiwanese built vessel. I would like to think that I'm a little more savvy than some new boat owners, (especially after reading so many of the posts found on CF ).

I'm also not "set" on a Hans Christian. If I stumble across a heavy displacement, well built vessel with the same appeal, of course I'll give her a second (and third, and forth) look.


Thanks Ann, I appreciate the heads up!
__________________
“Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.”
NorthernSeaWolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 15:25   #20
Registered User
 
Mike OReilly's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Good question
Boat: Rafiki 37
Posts: 4,034
Re: ...better late than never

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernSeaWolf View Post
...I'd like to think I'm not going in with rose colored glasses, blind to the complications that can arise from an older Taiwanese built vessel. I would like to think that I'm a little more savvy than some new boat owners, (especially after reading so many of the posts found on CF ).

I'm also not "set" on a Hans Christian. If I stumble across a heavy displacement, well built vessel with the same appeal, of course I'll give her a second (and third, and forth) look.


Thanks Ann, I appreciate the heads up!
Ann is one of the wise ones here on CF. She definitely knows what she speaks of.

As a fellow Taiwanese boat owner I agree with your aesthetic and seaworthiness choice, but would also offer caution considering some of the negatives of our boats. My Rafiki-37 is a well built, proven ocean going craft. Her lines and her teak would make your heart go pitter-patter (as she does for me), but they are not boats for everyone.

It sounds like you know what you want, which is great. But there are a lot of similar "leaky-teakies" out there: Everything from Tayanas and Rafikis, to Babas, Tashibas, Fast Passages, and of course Westsails. Lots to choose from in this category.
__________________
Why go fast, when you can go slow.
BLOG: www.helplink.com/CLAFC
Mike OReilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 21:20   #21
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,395
Images: 34
Re: ...better late than never

...so we are going to be tempted to offer up some other good choices in the solid, sea-worthy, heavy and cozy category. Do you want to consider some comparison shopping? Also, I forgot, are you planning world travel or PNW cruising (or both)? I wouldn't blame you if you were homesick for B.C.! Just curious, I suppose it doesn't change the recommendations. I haven't sailed any in that category but I do have a good old friend with a Freya 39 who has cruised all over the South Pacific with it. And it still looks like new. I have no idea how he does it. Well I actually did sail a Downeast 38 a bit in my younger days, I guess that falls in that category.
__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 08:03   #22
Registered User
 
NorthernSeaWolf's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: From Coastal BC, currently stuck in a corn field in Godforesaken, IN
Posts: 107
Re: ...better late than never

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike OReilly View Post
Ann is one of the wise ones here on CF. She definitely knows what she speaks of..... there are a lot of similar "leaky-teakies" out there: Everything from Tayanas and Rafikis, to Babas, Tashibas, Fast Passages, and of course Westsails. Lots to choose from in this category.
I agree; it didn't take long for me to identify Ann as a 'go to' person.
...and I do like the leaky-teakies!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
...so we are going to be tempted to offer up some other good choices in the solid, sea-worthy, heavy and cozy category. Do you want to consider some comparison shopping? Also, I forgot, are you planning world travel or PNW cruising (or both)?
I am definitely up for checking out other choices, but I would probably want direction on make/model/year, as opposed to a particular boat for sale - since I'm not ready to buy 'just yet'.

Coastal and blue water cruising...which creates other dilemmas. The big heavy broad isn't so awesome on the coast, with her deep keel and need for a decent gust, but I would definitely be toodling around the PNW. I also have definite plans to explore the South Pacific, Caribbean, and Mediterranean... hence the blue water needs.

Thanks everyone!!! I'd love to check out any sailboats you think might suit my fancy. At least 33, but not too big - I need to be able to single-hand her.
__________________
“Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.”
NorthernSeaWolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 14:20   #23
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,395
Images: 34
Re: ...better late than never

Well bluewaterboats.org has a bunch of good candidates with write-ups and then look at the "boats to vote for" too, because there are a lot of good ones there too. A heavy boat in light air... yes,but if you pack a big genoa, and a fresh diesel, it's all good. But some heavy boats do surprisingly well in light air strangely enough. A lot is made of draft by folks cruising the Caribbean, but really, if you draw 4 vs 6 feet over the rest of the world, does it make that much difference? If you are in 15 feet of water, watch out, no matter what boat you are in. At least where I am, there are a few places where you could be in 20 feet of water and an 18 foot tall rock could be underneath you, showing not a ripple. Not trying to scare you, just saying you don't need shoal draft to cruise coastally safely!
__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 14:48   #24
Registered User
 
NorthernSeaWolf's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: From Coastal BC, currently stuck in a corn field in Godforesaken, IN
Posts: 107
Re: ...better late than never

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
Well bluewaterboats.org has a bunch of good candidates with write-ups and then look at the "boats to vote for" too, because there are a lot of good ones there too. A heavy boat in light air... yes,but if you pack a big genoa, and a fresh diesel, it's all good. But some heavy boats do surprisingly well in light air strangely enough. A lot is made of draft by folks cruising the Caribbean, but really, if you draw 4 vs 6 feet over the rest of the world, does it make that much difference? If you are in 15 feet of water, watch out, no matter what boat you are in. At least where I am, there are a few places where you could be in 20 feet of water and an 18 foot tall rock could be underneath you, showing not a ripple. Not trying to scare you, just saying you don't need shoal draft to cruise coastally safely!
I've spent a lot of time on bluewaterboats.org, but I will check it out some more. When there's a list, such at Cruising Worlds "40 GREATEST PRODUCTION MONOHULLS OF ALL TIME", I sift through one by one... which is how I started the path to my favorite leaky-teakies!

Scared of taking a big, heavy girl into coastal waters? Nope; not even a little.... more tired of hearing everyone say how unpractical it is.


Thanks Don!
__________________
“Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.”
NorthernSeaWolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 16:07   #25
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,395
Images: 34
Re: ...better late than never

I didn't think much of that "40 greatest list." I think it sold magazines; everyone wanted to see if their boat was on it. And if it wasn't they all wrote in, furious. Mine wasn't on it and it certainly should have been! (In my humble opinion.) And who is saying it is unpractical to sail a heavy boat coastwise? Seems a silly thing to say to me.
__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2015, 18:14   #26
Registered User
 
NorthernSeaWolf's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: From Coastal BC, currently stuck in a corn field in Godforesaken, IN
Posts: 107
Re: ...better late than never

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
I didn't think much of that "40 greatest list." ...And who is saying it is unpractical to sail a heavy boat coastwise? Seems a silly thing to say to me.
Some of the boats made me
...and I'm sure it did sell a LOT of copies!

I have to agree - coastal sailing can be rough! It makes sense to me to be in a solid, seaworthy vessel... and like you said - I can *(hopefully) always fall back on fresh diesel!

Even with continuing to look at other boats, I'm feeling better and better about my personal favorites; largely thanks to chatting this up. Any criticism that stuck is slowly falling overboard...so thank you!

__________________

__________________
“Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.”
NorthernSeaWolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anchoring with better than better........ foggysail Anchoring & Mooring 9 19-07-2012 08:10
Better late than... Wyoming pirate Meets & Greets 7 06-03-2011 11:55
Better Late Than Never Windstorm1 Meets & Greets 5 28-07-2010 01:12
Better late than never? Mata'irea Meets & Greets 3 09-04-2008 14:52



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:13.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.