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Old 21-08-2010, 16:06   #1
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Bahamas and Beyond - Jan 2011

Hello, I have found this site very useful and thought I'd 'jump in'. My partner - Capt Ron (really!!!) and I are provisioning our 38' Lagoon Catamaran for our first long distance adventure.

Come the end of the year, when the boat is ready - well - ready or not - here we come! We are adding an additional solar panel, fixing the generator, having the sails repaired and resown, replacing the battery bank, installing a wind generator, making arrangements to convert our frige to 12V and purchase a stand alone freezer.
We have a watermaker on board too. There are lots of other things I'd like (being the female of the partnership - like new cabinets in the master cabin (to hold the few clothes and personal belongings we are taking), and perhaps a new cabinet in the galley to hold more of the much needed supplies.

We live in the Clearwater area of Florida and come January will set out on our sail to the Bahamas and then beyond - no return date in mind. I still have many questions and hope someone can help.

We have an income of $1500/mo. from pensions - what is the best way to make sure we have access to funds along the way. Is that a realistic number to go off on our adventure? We plan to moor most often and not use the marina's for other than dingy dock rental.

What about internet? I understand that wi/fi is available when we are close to land (which will be most of the time I suspect), and phone services? I think ssb would be great, but our boat is not outfitted for it and seems that it is a lot of money outside our budget to retrofit.

What about food and supplies? What should we make sure to bring and what is easily had elsewhere?

Are there others who are getting ready to make the same trip? Is there a place to really meet and speak wth others on the journey or who have experienced what is to come for us?

We like to bike ride - should we bring our full size bikes or invest in the fold up ones?

I would love to have any and all information that anyone would like to share.

Thank you.....and smooth sailing

Capt Ron and First Mate Marie
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Old 21-08-2010, 16:39   #2
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Welcome to CF.

My first bit of advice would be to breakdown your questions and post them separately under the appropriate sub-form and you will get better responses. Right now they are too many and too broad to address in the Meet & Greet forum.

Again, welcome aboard.
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Old 21-08-2010, 18:36   #3
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first question i would like to pose is where are you planning to get weather from? if we use our ssb and subscribe to chris parker and download gribs - yea we ponyed up the bucks for an ssb and pactor modem and by passed the make the boat pretty stuff at first to make sure we are safe --
oh yea it also gives us limited email
wifi in the out islands in not available --
you can subscribe to the sirius weather and i think they are moving beyond the us coast -
just something to think about

chuck patty and svsoulmates
on the hook solomons md
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Old 21-08-2010, 21:21   #4
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Regarding the Bahamas and not so much the points beyond:

Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyBloom View Post
We have an income of $1500/mo. from pensions...Is that a realistic number to go off on our adventure?
Like any budget, it all depends on your choices. Many cruiser's live on that. Do you own the boat out right? What boat maintenance might you have? Do you have to pay for health insurance out of that? etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyBloom View Post
What about internet?
Available from many towns in the Bahamas. A wifi extender will expand your range. Being able to get it with SSB or phone will extend it even more. With an average wifi extender, I still would often go a week or more with no internet. I purchased a Bahamas phone which was much cheaper than the roaming charges on my U.S. phone. There are a couple threads here about wifi extenders and wifi in the Bahamas which hopefully you can find with a forum search.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyBloom View Post
What about food and supplies? What should we make sure to bring and what is easily had elsewhere?
Places like Marsh Harbour, Nassau and Gerogetown will have many of the groceries one finds in the U.S. Other communities have stores that resemble small corner grocery stores or convenience stores. Prices are generally about 1.5 times higher. Unfortunately, it's the perishables that cost much more there. Rum is inexpensive. Wine is very expensive. There are a few things you just won't find there and a few things like condensed milk that are common there and not here.

More than food, be sure you have all the spare boat parts you need. Those can be very expensive and time intensive to replace in the Bahamas. Things like impellers, dinghy repair kit, spare bilge pumps, head parts, sail mending materials, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyBloom View Post
Are there others who are getting ready to make the same trip? Is there a place to really meet and speak wth others on the journey or who have experienced what is to come for us?
I prefer to stay away from flotillas so know less about that, but yes, there are some which I'm sure you can connect with online. Also, there are many jumping off points from Florida where you will find many cruiser's waiting for weather to cross. You'll bump into people in many locations.

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Originally Posted by MollyBloom View Post
We like to bike ride - should we bring our full size bikes or invest in the fold up ones?
That depends on your storage space and ability to get them to shore in your dinghy. Realize many Bahama islands are small with not many roads and most have no roads at all. Of course, it all depends on where you choose to spend your time. Also, remember you will be in a salt air environment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyBloom View Post
I would love to have any and all information that anyone would like to share.
The Bahamas are shallow. I love that they have so many unpopulated islands. Wait for weather. Most lows pass north of the Bahamas so you'll usually see winds clock clockwise with the passage of these systems. Have a great cruise!

(Some pictures, especially the Abacos and some other Bahamas cruising relevant info. on my website: www.bahamasmariner.com Very much still in progress)
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Old 22-08-2010, 00:45   #5
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We cruised on $500 to $1000 per month on our Privilege 39 catamaran which we purchased new. That meant we did not have many boat expenses for the first five years. After that, the boat expenses increased.

Whether or not you can do it on $1500 depends on the condition of the yacht, whether you eat out alot, and if you take expensive tours and airplane flights.
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Old 22-08-2010, 10:36   #6
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Weather

WE were planning to use XM serius weather - thought they would be available everywhere - hmmmm - might have to re-think that one. Isn't ssb - old technology?
I guess we took the boat out of the water too early as it just got back in the water BEFORE we thought of ssb. My captain kept telling me that was old technology and everyone used satellite by now.......not so true it seems.
I think we are looking at another option (one where we don't have to take the boat out of the water again so soon). Sat phone?

We don't need wifi ALL the times - and I hear that with an antenna, most moorings have wifi available.......we'd like internet, but don't HAVE to have it.

I really appreciate the help - thanks, Marie


Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckr View Post
first question i would like to pose is where are you planning to get weather from? if we use our ssb and subscribe to chris parker and download gribs - yea we ponyed up the bucks for an ssb and pactor modem and by passed the make the boat pretty stuff at first to make sure we are safe --
oh yea it also gives us limited email
wifi in the out islands in not available --
you can subscribe to the sirius weather and i think they are moving beyond the us coast -
just something to think about

chuck patty and svsoulmates
on the hook solomons md
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Old 22-08-2010, 10:46   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyBloom View Post
Isn't ssb - old technology?
Works. Easy. Reliable.
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Old 22-08-2010, 10:52   #8
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Bahamas and beyond

Our boat is late 90's but has been very well maintained and upgraded/updated, so our hope is that maintenance will be relatively minor. NO boat payments - and there is no way we can afford health insurance too - so that goes I'm afraid - we'll take our chances I guess.

What did you mean ' being able to extend the wifi extender with a SSB or phone'? Do you use the wifi extender with ssb or phone? I did read the forum comments about wifi and plan to use the suggestions there to get and install a wifi antenna. Question: How did you get a bahamas phone? Do you need an address? I will have a gsm phone before I leave the US, so all I need is a Bahamas sim card - are they difficult to get?


THank you for the 'few' things list - condensed milk is going on my list.


Yes, still putting together a list - your addition helps! thanks


Marie, SV Molly Bloom




Quote:
Originally Posted by nautical62 View Post
Regarding the Bahamas and not so much the points beyond:



Like any budget, it all depends on your choices. Many cruiser's live on that. Do you own the boat out right? What boat maintenance might you have? Do you have to pay for health insurance out of that? etc...




Available from many towns in the Bahamas. A wifi extender will expand your range. Being able to get it with SSB or phone will extend it even more. With an average wifi extender, I still would often go a week or more with no internet. I purchased a Bahamas phone which was much cheaper than the roaming charges on my U.S. phone. There are a couple threads here about wifi extenders and wifi in the Bahamas which hopefully you can find with a forum search.



Places like Marsh Harbour, Nassau and Gerogetown will have many of the groceries one finds in the U.S. Other communities have stores that resemble small corner grocery stores or convenience stores. Prices are generally about 1.5 times higher. Unfortunately, it's the perishables that cost much more there. Rum is inexpensive. Wine is very expensive. There are a few things you just won't find there and a few things like condensed milk that are common there and not here.


More than food, be sure you have all the spare boat parts you need. Those can be very expensive and time intensive to replace in the Bahamas. Things like impellers, dinghy repair kit, spare bilge pumps, head parts, sail mending materials, etc.




I prefer to stay away from flotillas so know less about that, but yes, there are some which I'm sure you can connect with online. Also, there are many jumping off points from Florida where you will find many cruiser's waiting for weather to cross. You'll bump into people in many locations.



That depends on your storage space and ability to get them to shore in your dinghy. Realize many Bahama islands are small with not many roads and most have no roads at all. Of course, it all depends on where you choose to spend your time. Also, remember you will be in a salt air environment.






The Bahamas are shallow. I love that they have so many unpopulated islands. Wait for weather. Most lows pass north of the Bahamas so you'll usually see winds clock clockwise with the passage of these systems. Have a great cruise!

(Some pictures, especially the Abacos and some other Bahamas cruising relevant info. on my website: www.bahamasmariner.com Very much still in progress)
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Old 22-08-2010, 11:01   #9
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We are new cruisers (1yr) and I can answer from my own experience. We are in the same boat so to speak (left from St Pete), and live on the same amount.

We use debit cards to access cash, retirement income is direct deposited.

For $1500 per mo - 18,000 per year: we eat well but not 'out', we tour islands by bus not on tours, we stock up on groceries where they are more affordable, we plan on airfare back once a year to visit family, and have boat maintenance budgeted for. Oh, and we anchor - 5 nights in marinas total (2 were free). For more info, budgets have been addressed in several strings.

I purchased tons of food before we left and I am so glad I did. The Bahamas are terribly expensive and selection poor if not in one of the two major cities. Foods to take have been addressed in several strings.

We love our folding bikes, easier to load on and off the dingy.
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Old 22-08-2010, 11:13   #10
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guess depends on how much money one has -- sat phones and that type of communications is great if you can afford them -- we can not -

ssb is old technology but as said above reliable and easy (kinda) -

we subscribe to chris parker at $295 a year and get his voice daily forecast and we can talk to him about our route and he will advise us on the weather and if it is good to go or not (our decision in the end) and if we have a blow coming when we need to be in by - we also get his daily email via ssb -

we download weather grib files to take a second look at the weather

we use shiptrak to update our travels on a google map so our family can tell where soulmates is how we are doing - you can view ours at www.shiptrak.org and type our ham call sign KI4SRY in the call sign box and click view all

we use airmail - as communication email with the family for important stuff

we use ssb to keep in contact with cruising friends who also have ssb - it is a family and use the ssb to plan meets several days out or where others are or if we have a boat problem check with others on fixes - we use the cruiserheimers net at 0830 in the morning --

old technology - maybe but very useful

we also have ssb set up as a distress call if the worse happens - vhf works for maybe 25miles on a great day but out side that no one may be listening - we can call maritime mobile at 14.300 if before 2200 if we need help or the coast guard on several ssb stations to get assistance - great if you are 200 miles out and crap hits the fan - what cg does best -


siruis i think is working to expand their coverage and they cover the carib by now but not sure

not sure why you need the boat out of the water for an ssb - we installed ours with the boat in the water and have a great reception - oh yea - we did not cut our back stay for an antenna - we use a gam electronics antenna and while some say they do not work ask the folks on cruiseheimers as at times i am a relay with a very strong signal --
you also can get a ham license without doing morse code now - so if you can read and do a bit of study it is easy to get

just our thoughts
chuck patty and svsoulmates
on the hook solomons, md
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Old 22-08-2010, 13:21   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janice View Post
... For $1500 per mo - 18,000 per year: we eat well but not 'out', we tour islands by bus not on tours, we stock up on groceries where they are more affordable ...
Indeed, to all of your contribution.
However, these quoted words almost say it all, on their own.
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Old 22-08-2010, 14:18   #12
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Bahamas and Beyond

Marie & Ron,
With an unlocked GSM phone, all you will need for the Bahamas is a Batelco SIM card(about $12US), and some prepaid time cards( $ 5.00,10.00,20.00 US). You do have to add time every 90 days to keep the same number working. Sims are available at any Batelco office( google locations). Service is generally good and calls are only $0.3-0.6 a minute. Good luck!
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Old 22-08-2010, 15:08   #13
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I just purchased a bahamas phone for about $50, but as Thanna5 indicated you can sometimes have a U.S. phone unlocked and get a new sim card instead. No address is needed. You buy prepaid minutes which is very convenient.

I kept my U.S. Iphone active so I could download weather forecasts when needed and when I was not within Wifi range, but could get a phone signal. I should note that it was rare, I got wifi, but common I could get a phone signal. That of course will depend on your own situation to some extent.

Having someone send a 5-day forecast as a text message is also affordable. (50 cents on my AT&T plan)

I found a SSB receiver only a useful way to pick up Chris Parker's forecasts much of the time, but had times I just couldn't get it.
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Old 22-08-2010, 16:12   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyBloom View Post
Hello, I have found this site very useful and thought I'd 'jump in'. My partner - Capt Ron (really!!!) and I are provisioning our 38' Lagoon Catamaran for our first long distance adventure.
<snip>

We have an income of $1500/mo. from pensions - what is the best way to make sure we have access to funds along the way. Is that a realistic number to go off on our adventure? We plan to moor most often and not use the marina's for other than dingy dock rental.
It costs whatever you want to spend but many folks with well prepared boats and realistic requirements have done it for less.

I used a debit card for my cruising but carried several credit cards as well. I carefully tracked expenses and one of the first things I did when I got to an internet connection was either Skype or check my balance to make sure things agreed. I found it less stressful to do transactions at banks rather than ATMs and I was very leery of using credit cards, carrying more cash than I wanted to lose in a day, and left the jewelry home.

You should probably arrange for direct payment of any bills you get regularly. I contacted my credit card company before I left an island to make sure they knew I was leaving, there were no strange charges, and told them where I'd be next and about what time. When I got to my next destination, it took a quick email or Skype call to get the card back in operation. I do this not because I'm that paranoid, but having traveled in the past to areas where credit card theft was high, the credit card company wanted to cut its losses by having me on a rather short leash.

I collected a rather esoteric collection of change and bills. Many are used in other locations with no problems and others could be converted to the currency of the island/country. I wish change was convertible as well. I also carried a few hundred dollars in low denomination US currency in case the bank was closed or I needed the cash immediately. USD seemed to be accepted everywhere.

If you're planning on anchoring/mooring then you should have good ground tackle - anchors, chain rode, nylon rode, snubbers, windlass, etc. Anchors get lost and fatigue and rode wears through so budget for that. Chain needs to be re-galvanized every 5 years or so and the process weakens the chains strength. That means that you could probably get 10 years out of a next larger size chain before replacing it.

Many locations now have mooring fees and either very small or rolly anchorages. The going rate in the Caribbean is about $15/night for a mooring so you need to consider that. Many marinas charge for dinghy access and that can add up as well. Since you're mooring/anchoring out you've got to consider gas, 2-cycle oil, and depreciation on the tender as a cruising cost.

Many countries require cruising (and) fishing permits. Most have fees for checking in and out and some have insurance and documentation requirements. I'd suggest doing a bit of research about the places you're likely to visit to get an idea of costs and time limits. All these will impact the cost of cruising.

Quote:
What about internet? I understand that wi/fi is available when we are close to land (which will be most of the time I suspect), and phone services? I think ssb would be great, but our boat is not outfitted for it and seems that it is a lot of money outside our budget to retrofit.
Depending on your location you may be able to grab a free wifi signal from your boat. These wifi boosters aren't expensive and do a good job of bringing the world to you. The biggest problem I've found is that many wifi signals are locked. The good news is that many places that cater to cruisers have free, or very inexpensive, wifi. It may require you going ashore and buying a beverage but the wifi will be cheaper that way.

Phone service is interesting. Places like the Bahamas still use analog cell phones and SIM cards. I'd recommend getting a quad-band or world phone that works on all frequencies. You then buy a SIM card for your location and then a time card and start using it. Many cell services don't include internet as a feature of the cell phone. The further offshore of off the beaten path you get, the poorer the coverage. In the Caribbean where countries are within sight of each other, what works on one island may not work on the other. If you're wanting to make calls, then I've always found it cheaper to buy a local phone card and use the pay phones. You connect for a cheap price then use the card to make the calls.

SSB is a great accessory, but it's expensive. If you don't want to be able to transmit and talk long distance, I'd still recommend a good general coverage radio. You'll get to listen to the SSB nets, get weather reports, listen to foreign and US stations, and get coverage of the local stations (which can be a laugh riot in themselves) as well.

One of the benefits of SSB is that you can send emails (but not attachments) for a small fee (or free if you're a licensed ham). Marine SSBs are fairly simple to use.

I'd suggest chatting up the other boaters in the anchorage or along the way on the VHF (and a couple handhelds can make finding each other much easier). Cruisers are a great group and willingly share hard earned tricks, suggestions, and secrets.

Quote:
What about food and supplies? What should we make sure to bring and what is easily had elsewhere?
You can get most anything you need along the way; but not in every location. The cost will be higher and the names you're not used to probably won't be available but supplies are out there. That, to me, was one of the interesting and special things about cruising; using what was locally available and being willing to try new things.

You didn't say where you'd be cruising but lets take the Bahamas and Caribbean in general. The best places to provision in the Bahamas are probably Marsh Harbour, Nassau, and Georgetown, Exumas. In the Caribbean, it'd probably be San Juan, PR, St. Thomas, USVI, St. Martin, St. Lucia, Martinique, Grenada, then Trinidad/Tobago.

Many cruisers I chatted with brought quantities of: shampoo, conditioner, perfume, aftershave, deodorant, dental floss, makeup, suntan lotion, bug spray, etc. Many found equal or better substitutes further in their travels; others didn't. The non-US familiar goods can be excellent if you're willing to try them.

I'd suggest bringing enough for the first 30 days or so. I'd also suggest bringing a 6-month supply of things you can't live without (with me it's Crest toothpaste, powdered lemonade, and good coffee). You'll find that many paper products aren't as 'smooth' as what's available so you might add some of that to the list. Don't forget special medications, especially OTC ones. If you're on prescription meds, then you should talk to your doctor about getting extended quantities or non-US regulated OTC substitutes, the best way to prolong the life of the meds (heat can really kill the potency of many medications), and get your shots current.

If you have special dietary needs (such as lactose intolerant or a need for soy milk) then you should carry an extra quantity as these items can be difficult or impossible to find. If you have special ambulatory requirements (EEEEE wide feet for example) you might consider bringing an extra pair of shoes. You will walk a lot and much of that will be in salt water so plan accordingly.

On the mechanical side, I'd recommend a selection of fuel filters (engine and RACOR), oil filters, spare engine/genset belts, some 5-gal plastic buckets, enough oil for a couple changes, and a good tool kit. A chat with the service department at your engine mfgr may suggest some items worth adding to the spares kit. Don't forget: wire, splices, hose clamps, bulbs, water/bilge pump repair kits, toilet repair kit, sail repair kit, fasteners, spare line, manuals, cruising guides, and some charts.

Quote:
Are there others who are getting ready to make the same trip? Is there a place to really meet and speak wth others on the journey or who have experienced what is to come for us?

We like to bike ride - should we bring our full size bikes or invest in the fold up ones?
I carried a folding bike when I cruised the Caribbean but found the cost didn't equate to comfort or durability. They do store small though. I'd recommend getting a good quality bike that suits your riding style and have a bag fabricated for it. I'd make sure the wheels came off and it could be stored inside the boat. You'll have to be more diligent about maintenance (cleaning, oiling) and probably should carry a spare set of tires, a couple of chains and spare pedals, and a half dozen tubes along with an extended repair kit and pump. I'd also recommend a good lock that goes through both tires and the frame, and I'd recommend an easily removable seat as well. BTDT. If you can get parts that work on both bikes then you'll be better off.

I'd also suggest getting some canvas bags to carry items in and a backpack that you can fill with shopping goodies or enough for a long ride.

Quote:
I would love to have any and all information that anyone would like to share.

Thank you.....and smooth sailing

Capt Ron and First Mate Marie
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Old 30-08-2010, 13:47   #15
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Aloha and welcome aboard!
You've got lots of responses already. I'll just chime in on the bike thing. Most foldups are not as efficient as the regular sized geared bikes and are a bit heavier due to the folding apparatus. I'd opt for some good sunbrella covers for your bikes and store them on deck since you have a huge boat. Wheels could be taken off and stored below.
Good luck in your preparations.
Kind regards,
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