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Old 21-11-2012, 07:42   #1
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A Dream...

As far back as childhood I always dreamed of living on a boat and traveling .I just surpassed the milestone birthday of a HALF a CENTURY and realized I truly am not getting any younger. Both kids are on their own and the husband is self employed and is ready for anything. I live in a GREAT place... Southern California and I work as a General Manager in retail. I am grateful to have a job but my passion has always been with the sea! I want to take the GIANT step and I am looking for any and all advice on how to make my dream a reality! I am interested in all aspects of the journey... how to prepare for a life on a boat, life on a boat with a dog, finances how much money you may need, how you learn all the things you need to know, any and all information to help me transition from this life of corporate America to a completely different lifestyle all together! I am scared to make the step but am also scared that at some point in my life I will look back and say " I should have" Can anyone shoot me some answers???? Thank you so much!
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Old 24-11-2012, 08:33   #2
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Re: A Dream...

It's hard to give any advise not knowing your prerequisites – what experience do you and your husband have? Anyway, don't be frightened by your age – it's never too late to start something new. And statistically you have lots of time yet if you're healthy.

One place to start planning (also recommended by SkiprJohn) could be Mahina Expedition - Selecting A Boat for Offshore Cruising

You got to have a dream,...If you don't have a dream,...How you gonna have a dream come true?
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Old 24-11-2012, 10:42   #3
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Re: A Dream...

I have known people with the same dream and the only traveling they really did was on and off the dock because they bought the biggest boat they could afford without thinking about fuel cost, marina cost, and
maintenance cost etc. Best thing is buy the smallest boat you can afford for the traveling you plan on doing.
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Old 24-11-2012, 10:49   #4
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Re: A Dream...

1) Buy a boat
2) Set the date
3) Go

It's easy really. Just do it and you'll figure it out as you go.
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Old 24-11-2012, 11:09   #5
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Re: A Dream...

A few recommendations...your sailboat should be 35-40 ft, if you plan on cruising the "seven seas" with some comfort...the boat's keel should not exceed 6 ft, preferably 5 ft or less...you need basic knowledge of seamanship and piloting skills (a few courses from a sailing school should give you the basics that you need to build on; study "Chapman's seamanship textbook")...take a course in bare-boat chartering, then try a charter or two before investing in your new endeavor...check local marinas for "old salts" who have traveled much of their lives for "must have electronics on board" vs "it would be nice to have"...attend a few boat shows and home-in on a few manufacturers, in addition to taking "test sails"...never ever rush in your decision...spend as little money as possible...boating is not a cheap life style, so figure on spending about $1500 USD/month for expenses...you should have about $10-$15K in the bank, for emergencies while cruising...know your health limitations, and stay fit...get advice from engineers and architects, if you have technical questions (source: college professors). Opinions are like Supreme Court Justices; each Justice got one! Good luck!
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Old 24-11-2012, 15:54   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teknav
A few recommendations...your sailboat should be 35-40 ft, if you plan on cruising the "seven seas" with some comfort...the boat's keel should not exceed 6 ft, preferably 5 ft or less...you need basic knowledge of seamanship and piloting skills (a few courses from a sailing school should give you the basics that you need to build on; study "Chapman's seamanship textbook")...take a course in bare-boat chartering, then try a charter or two before investing in your new endeavor...check local marinas for "old salts" who have traveled much of their lives for "must have electronics on board" vs "it would be nice to have"...attend a few boat shows and home-in on a few manufacturers, in addition to taking "test sails"...never ever rush in your decision...spend as little money as possible...boating is not a cheap life style, so figure on spending about $1500 USD/month for expenses...you should have about $10-$15K in the bank, for emergencies while cruising...know your health limitations, and stay fit...get advice from engineers and architects, if you have technical questions (source: college professors). Opinions are like Supreme Court Justices; each Justice got one! Good luck!
Wow! If everyone listened to this advice, there would not be very many people out cruising!
Cruising is a part of life just like anything else, either you do it or you dont! You can live your whole life in one place or many, it is up to you!
Some people are happy reading about other parts of the world and some are happy seeing other parts of the worked personally.
"Some are dreamers and some are doers! Which are you?"
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Old 24-11-2012, 16:02   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhelewski
As far back as childhood I always dreamed of living on a boat and traveling .I just surpassed the milestone birthday of a HALF a CENTURY and realized I truly am not getting any younger. Both kids are on their own and the husband is self employed and is ready for anything. I live in a GREAT place... Southern California and I work as a General Manager in retail. I am grateful to have a job but my passion has always been with the sea! I want to take the GIANT step and I am looking for any and all advice on how to make my dream a reality! I am interested in all aspects of the journey... how to prepare for a life on a boat, life on a boat with a dog, finances how much money you may need, how you learn all the things you need to know, any and all information to help me transition from this life of corporate America to a completely different lifestyle all together! I am scared to make the step but am also scared that at some point in my life I will look back and say " I should have" Can anyone shoot me some answers???? Thank you so much!
Try reading some books by: lin and larry pardey
They have built two boats which they lived and travel the world . They lived and worked along the way. Their boat is the simplest boat of anyones .
They live a very simple and enjoyable life.
"Go simple, go small, just go" is there motto.
You can learn alot from them!
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Old 24-11-2012, 16:09   #8
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Re: A Dream...

"Some are dreamers and some are doers! Which are you?"[/QUOTE]

i guess this sums it up -- we met a couple in maine a few years ago - we were on year 3 and they had just cut the dock lines - we knew our boat needed work as well as the crew - the other folks tried to talk us into heading to mexico for a circum nav - now remember this was their 1st yr out -
we went to the bahamas for our 2nd year down there and then back to the cheaspeake for some major boat upgrades and then headed out - met the same boat in the bay islands of honduras, we were headed to panama and they were headed northbound - boat was put up for sail and they went land cruising -
they found this life was not for them -
so take it slow and your time - it is a great life but not always easy - the slick publications don't tell you about all the not so pleasant times - but gosh give it a try -

just our opinion
chuck patty and svsoulmates
in trinidad
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Old 24-11-2012, 16:31   #9
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Re: A Dream...

It is one thing when you are very young and full of energy. You can do a lot of things and if you don't succeed, you can try again. Once you hit your 50's plus, it does not mean that you are about to die. It means that you need more comfort in travel, less spent energy and you have to be very careful on how you spend the money that you have; not easy to replenish your finances when they are gone. That is why I recommended a medium size sailboat. I also recommended to see/sail several models at boat shows. I also recommended basic seamanship education to build on. When it comes to technical issues, I recommended to call practicing engineers and architects. I am an engineer and a biochemist. I have been sailing for over 30 years, on someone else's boats (35ft-50ft); charters and friends. I know what it takes to own a boat; it is not for everyone. I stand by my advice! Happy holidays!
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Old 24-11-2012, 19:09   #10
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Let me add another book recommendation:
Buy, Outfit and Sail, by Fatty Goodlander.
Excellent dream fodder, and a great overview of what it takes to get out there.
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Old 24-11-2012, 19:24   #11
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Re: A Dream...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teknav View Post
A few recommendations...your sailboat should be 35-40 ft, if you plan on cruising the "seven seas" with some comfort...the boat's keel should not exceed 6 ft, preferably 5 ft or less...you need basic knowledge of seamanship and piloting skills (a few courses from a sailing school should give you the basics that you need to build on; study "Chapman's seamanship textbook")...take a course in bare-boat chartering, then try a charter or two before investing in your new endeavor...check local marinas for "old salts" who have traveled much of their lives for "must have electronics on board" vs "it would be nice to have"...attend a few boat shows and home-in on a few manufacturers, in addition to taking "test sails"...never ever rush in your decision...spend as little money as possible...boating is not a cheap life style, so figure on spending about $1500 USD/month for expenses...you should have about $10-$15K in the bank, for emergencies while cruising...know your health limitations, and stay fit...get advice from engineers and architects, if you have technical questions (source: college professors). Opinions are like Supreme Court Justices; each Justice got one! Good luck!
+1 This should be etched in granite! I have had around 5 Ocean going boats. Some too small, one too large to single hand. This one (so far) seems to fit the single hand rule if necessary. An older boat with under $50K invested in it and moderately equip'd with electronics. I always warn people...don't fall into the gadget trap. If you do, you'll end up an armchair sailor on a forum somewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teknav View Post
It is one thing when you are very young and full of energy. You can do a lot of things and if you don't succeed, you can try again. Once you hit your 50's plus, it does not mean that you are about to die. It means that you need more comfort in travel, less spent energy and you have to be very careful on how you spend the money that you have; not easy to replenish your finances when they are gone. That is why I recommended a medium size sailboat. I also recommended to see/sail several models at boat shows. I also recommended basic seamanship education to build on. When it comes to technical issues, I recommended to call practicing engineers and architects. I am an engineer and a biochemist. I have been sailing for over 30 years, on someone else's boats (35ft-50ft); charters and friends. I know what it takes to own a boat; it is not for everyone. I stand by my advice! Happy holidays!
I planned since my early 30's. But always an obstacle...children, mortgages, careers. Now in my 50's it's all coming to an end. A home paid for, rental income, a well found vessel. And yes, I now like to rough it only a little compared to my 30's. I have always worked with my hands, so boat maintenance was a fun education for me.
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Old 25-11-2012, 03:00   #12
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I love it when first time posters come on and ask a dreamy question that has to be answered with long replies and then never returns to comment. This same post was made in the live aboard section and there are lots of advisory posts going there too but no replies from the poster.

Oh well, I enjoy reading the replies myself. Moderators might want to consolidate the threads.
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Old 25-11-2012, 03:14   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PamlicoTraveler
1) Buy a boat
2) Set the date
3) Go

It's easy really. Just do it and you'll figure it out as you go.
This is simply not good advice. The cruising ports of the world are full of discarded dreams, of grumpy men on their own etc.

Firstly dip your toe in the water, charter, crew , build experience see the bad and the good sides, build an informed view, then act. Absolutely start now, but the last thing is buying a boat.

Dave
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Old 25-11-2012, 03:18   #14
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Originally Posted by seagypsy2012

Try reading some books by: lin and larry pardey
They have built two boats which they lived and travel the world . They lived and worked along the way. Their boat is the simplest boat of anyones .
They live a very simple and enjoyable life.
"Go simple, go small, just go" is there motto.
You can learn alot from them!
Of course it is, if you have the superb skills and boat building experience that Larry Pardy has. Experts always make things " look" easy. Larry Pardy has been sailing since he was 9.

The "go now" brigade is all very well, a few that do actually survive and prosper in the activity. They are the ones you hear about. The ones whose dreams collapses are very much in the majority but of course you rarely hear those stories.

the best way is to begin, but begin in an orderly and measured way, try chartering, experience sailing with friends or crewing . Do you actually like the lifestyle, can you handle the lows with the highs. sailing can be wearisome, cold and frightening, living on a boat can be confining and a detriment to relationships. Take it slow, build experience.

don't just Go, Learn

Dave
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Old 25-11-2012, 06:44   #15
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Re: A Dream...

Funny how a thread comes alive once someone starts posting...

And how a users name can contradict his message ;-)
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