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Old 09-01-2009, 20:20   #16
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Boeshield: I've found it to be excellent as a protectant for metals when you need to shield them from corrosion during expended layups.
WD-40: the best hornet/wasp/bee/fireant killer, bar none. Exoskeletons seem to be very vulnerable to the petroleum content - nearly instant death to flying bees/wasps/hornets as well as their nests. I won't open up a boat (after storage) without a can of WD40 at the ready.
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Old 09-01-2009, 21:06   #17
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I seems there are some serious lubricating and knife snobs out there. I have used all the high tech lubes, and special formulas for those special components my whole life and end up going back to WD-40 for most of them because it works, it is handy, convenient, cheap and plentiful. The best oil to use is the one you use the most.


A Ginsu knife can cut a shoe in half (don't know why you need to do that) and then slice a tomato so thin, you can feed a family for a week and they don't cost that much if they do break which I have not have not seen yet. I have Chicago Cutlery and Wustoff knives costing way more and they take a ton of care and take up space in my drawers. I only use them when the ginsus are in the dishwasher. I'm sure that the really expensive knives do a much better job in a 5 star restaurant with their correct blade and handle balance, but I'm in a hurry and want a thinly sliced turkey sandwich and don't really care if the tomato slices may have a slight flaw on the third slice. I'm on a boat, not competing on the Iron Chef. The best knife is the one you use the most.


If it works for you, use it. Name, price and reputation should not be a factor.
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Old 09-01-2009, 21:32   #18
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I couldn't agree more about name and price, though it is a reputation-based economy and eventually, we hope, that comes to reflect reality. Advertising is largely a way to subvert that process; forums like this are a way to restore it.

I use the standard cheapie knives most of the time also, but have one special little Japanese one that takes the most amazing edge when I run it through the Spyderco. There are things that it does better than anything else, for purely metallurgical reasons... though it requires more care (not stainless) and thus spends most of its time on the rack. An acceptable trade-off...

Same with the lubricating potions (and WD-40 does have its place; I have a couple of cans around as well).

Cheers!
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Old 09-01-2009, 21:56   #19
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I am new to boeshield T-9 as a can came with my boat...I sprayed a new combination lock with the stuff and it turned it into a waxy mess in a week..so far Im not impressed with its lubrication ability but it might just be the cats meow for long term storage of metal parts if they dont have to function speadely..
It's not a good lubricant IMHO but rather exactly what you saw a rather waxy barrier to prevent rust & corrosion which I find it does only an ok job with. For rust protection I like TC-11, hard to find, but works quite well & CRC Heavy Duty Corrosion Inhibitor. For straight spray lubes I like Super Lube & Tri-Flow. For penetrating oils I like PB Blaster, Kroil or Thrust. For a dry film lubricant for sailboats I love McLube Sailkote!


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I collect firearms to some degree and am thinking it might just make a great long term storage protectant..but it would defintly need to be cut back off with hoppies #9 to get the smooth action back.
I would not feel comfortable using it on my Italian double guns... I do love the smell of #9 though. Is that not one of the best smells on the planet..?
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Old 09-01-2009, 22:08   #20
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10-4 to that...
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Old 10-01-2009, 00:32   #21
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DO use WD as a knife lubricant.

DO NOT use WD as a "personal" lubricant.

IMHO...

Although....


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Old 10-01-2009, 12:18   #22
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DO use WD as a knife lubricant.

DO NOT use WD as a "personal" lubricant.

IMHO...

Although....


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You've been there too, huh. Sometimes life deals painful messages.
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Old 21-02-2009, 22:56   #23
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A 62-year-old man, new to the suburban Dallas neighborhood, walks into a local hardware store and announces he's looking for a job. He spends an hour in the store, shopping and talking to other customers, before purchasing some flashlights, batteries, a few night lights and a can of WD-40.

Question: What is this elderly man (with a history of alcoholism, a C student college grad who has never had an honest job, married with two children already living on their own) going to do with this particular assortment of products?

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Old 21-02-2009, 23:41   #24
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#44

We use it in the shop for polishing shafts and valve disks.

You spray a little on the part and then some on the emery cloth and then polish the part (lathe or sanding disk). WD-40 works as a vehicle to keep the abrasive from loading up and adds to the cutting power of the grit.

I buy it by the 5 gl. container about once a year. Other then that it's only used as Water Displacement. It washes right off with Windex.
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Old 22-02-2009, 06:37   #25
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I once saw a similar lengthy list of uses for " Skin so Soft"
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Old 22-02-2009, 07:32   #26
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I use it all the time, I buy it by the gallon and use the refillable plastic spray bottles. When need a penetrant, a corrosion blocker, electrionics cleaner, I use a product made for those jobs.
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Old 22-02-2009, 07:33   #27
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I once saw a similar lengthy list of uses for " Skin so Soft"
Avonís Skin-so-Soft is a proprietary blend of mild detergents & emolients.

Unconfirmed list of ingredients for Skin-so-Soft:
water
glycerin
ethylhexyl palmitate
dimethicone
steareth-20
aluminum starch octenylsuccinate
simmondsia chinensis (jojoba) seed oil
amaranthus caudatus seed extract
saccharomyces lysate extract
retinyl palmitate
tocopheryl acetate
butyrospermum parkii (shea butter) extract
cetearyl alcohol
steareth-2
glyceryl stearate
caprylic/capric triglyceride
imidazolidinyl urea
methylparaben
carbomer
ceteareth-20
disodium edta
propylparaben
potassium hydroxide
trimethylsiloxysilicate
fragrance
polysorbate 80
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Old 22-02-2009, 08:32   #28
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The potion I have found best for loosening a rusted fitting is brake fluid mixed with acetone. Have to to be careful where you spill it, it ruins paint fast but makes most penetrating fluids seem rather slow working. I have gotten head bolts off 70 year old tractor engines with this mixture, when nothing else worked including all the rust busters at the auto part store.

If you want something to rust for sure Spray it with WD-40 and come back in a year, works everytime IMO. Stuff is good for chewing gum and road tar removal, and maybe noisy hinges if you don't mind the mess of dust that develops later.

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Old 22-02-2009, 10:18   #29
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The potion I have found best for loosening a rusted fitting is brake fluid mixed with acetone.
michael
bluzzin/Michael, do you mix them 50/50? I'd like to try that for a frozen padlock.
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Old 22-02-2009, 12:42   #30
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50/50 works fine, it is not critical. Time really helps. Way cheaper than Kroil and works about as well or better IMO.

Another one that works was written up in Home Shop Machinist Magazine , below are the results of their test and cost .

"The April/May 2007 edition of Machinist's Workshop did a test of penetrating oils where they measured the force required to loosen rusty test devices. Buy the issue if you want to see how they did the test. The results reported were interesting. The lower the number of pounds the better. Mighty interesting results for simple acetone and tranny fluid!

Penetrating oil . Average load .. Price per fluid ounce
None ................. 516 pounds .
WD-40 .............. 238 pounds .. $0.25
PB Blaster ......... 214 pounds .. $0.35
Liquid Wrench ... 127 pounds .. $0.21
Kano Kroil ........ 106 pounds .. $0.75
ATF-Acetone mix.. 53 pounds .. $0.10

The ATF-Acetone mix was a 50/50 mix (1 to 1 ratio)."


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