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Old 27-01-2019, 21:07   #1
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The Great Barrier Reef- resistant coral

Just watched a documentary about coral bleaching.

They believe the coral dies because the bacteria that live in the coral that provide 95% of the needed nutrition. They say the bacteria are not able to survive the change in temp and release a chemical when stressed that the coral expells with the bacteria and die.

They are working on bacteria resistant to the heat change and new strains of coral that can survive. They believe the temperature will max out around the year 2050, they are trying and succeeding in creating coral and bacteria that can survive in the expected maximum temps.

Question is should they introduce them to the reef ?

They concede cross breeding corals will result in less coral variety and GM bacteria, ........ who knows what the outcome might be.

History shows the reef will come back, not sure when, or if it will in fact go, I suspect not.

Should we interfere, should we try to keep things the same or let them change.

Will this be another cane toad or crown of thorns mistake?

Tricky questions with unconfirmed premises.

Interested to hear thoughts.
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Old 27-01-2019, 21:33   #2
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Re: The Great Barrier Reef- resistant coral

I'm sure this is very old fashioned of me, but no, i think we should not interfere at the genetic level with ourselves, or nature, either. It is only a feeling, but humanity seems bent on doing every single thing it can, and it seems to me that there is the possibility to do undreamed of harm. So, I think we should not, but I expect we will.

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Old 27-01-2019, 22:20   #3
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Re: The Great Barrier Reef- resistant coral

x2. Definitely not! Wanting to introduce a solution to a non-existent problem is just plain dumb.


https://sailing-whitsundays.com/arti...t-barrier-reef
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The Great Barrier Reef is the largest living organism on the planet, stretching over 2,600 kilometres in length and covering 344,400km2 of the ocean. It consists of 2,900 individual reefs, 900 islands and can be seen from space. It is home to 1,625 species of fish, 600 types of coral, 133 types of sharks and rays and 6 species of sea turtles.
The growth and evolution of the reef did not happen overnight. In fact, it is over 20 million years in the making. The reef as we know it today is built on the backs and bones of many millions of years of coral as the ocean levels have changed, islands have formed and land has settled.
The current formation that we know and love is about 6,000 to 8,000 years old and sits on the platform of a much older reef. The formation, location and depth have changed as the continental shelf and sea level have changed and will likely continue to do as sea levels change and the earth's crust shifts. The reef is always growing as it is a living organism and will continue to diversify and evolve as the years pass.
Our current reef began to form after the Last Glacial Maximum, or the peak of the Ice Age, when glaciers were covering most of the earth and sea levels were at a all time low. With sea levels 160 metres lower than they currently are and 20,000 years in difference, it is easy to understand why our current reef is so drastically different from where it began.
Most of the oceans' water was occupied in glaciers all over the world, drastically altering both ocean and land scapes. It was at this time that reefs began to form around islands that were created by a submerged coastal plain, formed by sediments of an eroding mountain range - The Great Dividing Range, Australia's largest. Reefs formed around these islands, but as the sea levels rose and the continental islands were submerged, they left behind coral formations with continued to grow. Those corals, which now sit alone out in the ocean, are what we know as The Great Barrier Reef. The reefs and cays that sit off the shores of Australia are the final evidence of long submerged mountains and islands on the former coast of Australia.
The Great Barrier Reef took many thousands of years to form as we know it today. It consists of three different types of reefs, including barrier reefs (reefs running parallel to shore with a lagoon between the shore and reef), fringing reefs (reefs that are close to shore, surrounding islands or hugging the coastline) and atoll reefs (a usually circular reef that surrounds a lagoon). The 2,900 individual reefs make up its entirety, which each continuing to grow and evolve with each passing day.
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Old 27-01-2019, 22:23   #4
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Re: The Great Barrier Reef- resistant coral

Not until they take care of the rabbits and foxes they introduced into the country.
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Old 27-01-2019, 23:02   #5
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Re: The Great Barrier Reef- resistant coral

I understand thoughts on both sides, I guess I don't know enough about it.

I hate to think that we might loose a bunch of reef and I hate to think we might stuff it up trying to fix it.

We are experts at making a mess of nature and pretty poor at fixing it.

What I think does worry me is that a small bunch of people will make this decision, probably made up of a majority of people who have worked closely on these solutions and are passionate about the work.

Hardly the right people for the decision.
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Old 27-01-2019, 23:20   #6
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Re: The Great Barrier Reef- resistant coral

Nature hates stability. Mankind strives for it. I argued with a science teacher about the concept of “climax community” (in essence, forests all end up old growth). If that was true, we’d never see new forests, young trees, shrubs, open meadows. Everything dies, things pop up in other places, etc. natural kills things off and creates new life. The more we muck with things, the more we screw things up.
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Old 28-01-2019, 05:19   #7
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Re: The Great Barrier Reef- resistant coral

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave_S View Post
I understand thoughts on both sides, I guess I don't know enough about it.
I hate to think that we might loose a bunch of reef and I hate to think we might stuff it up trying to fix it...
I also.

Coral reefs tend to be vulnerable to damage from warmer waters, but at least one coral species may be able to adapt to the higher ocean temperatures that may come with climate change.

Bacteria in certain microbiomes appear to help corals adapt to higher water temperatures and protect against bleaching, as shown by a KAUST-led research team.
Read more at: ➥ https://phys.org/news/2017-02-relati...teria.html#jCp

Scientists say good bacteria could be the key to keeping coral healthy, able to withstand the impacts of global warming and to secure the long-term survival of reefs worldwide.
Read more at: ➥ https://phys.org/news/2016-06-good-b...-reef.html#jCp
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Old 28-01-2019, 05:31   #8
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Re: The Great Barrier Reef- resistant coral

On the plus side, we're getting new reef growing further south than ever before thanks to the water warming. Unfortunately, that also means irukandji jellyfish are coming further south.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-...-coast/8153122
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