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Old 21-02-2011, 08:50   #31
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

There is this one I have had in my bookmarks that might be able to do it with some fuel bladders and a ?better? engine that is in your price range. A boat similar went from New York to England and Holland (find it on the Kadey Krogen web site). They added a wing engine.

Kadey Krogen 42

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Old 21-02-2011, 11:57   #32
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

Here's four I pulled off Yachtworld.com to give you an idea of what you can expect for the money. All will happily motor all day and night if you require but obviously do have the advantage if having sail power as well.

1983 Hudson Force 50 Sail New and Used Boats for Sale -

1980 Gulfstar SAILMASTER Sail New and Used Boats for Sale - uk.yachtworld.com

1980 Nauticat Motorsailer Sail New and Used Boats for Sale - uk.yachtworld.com

1987 Corbin Corbin 39 Aft Cockpit Pilothouse Sail New and Used Boats

My choice would be the Nauticat (the 3rd one), a great name and fantastic layout with a huge looking master cabin in the stern for you and plenty of space on deck for the dogs to run around. Check out that lovely big pilothouse with enclosed helm. All the toys, even including a plumbed in washing machine, all for 20k under budget!

Being big heavy motorsailors, they won't be quick but their bulk will give you a kinder ride than a lighter, faster 'proper' sail boat.

I see these kind of vessels as being the best compromise, giving you a fair amount of space for living aboard but still being able to go pretty much anywhere.

Good luck with your search!
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Old 21-02-2011, 21:21   #33
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

If you're still cautious about Cats and Tris capsizing in "rough seas", look at the 34'th America's cup. There was a cat and a tri, heeled at ~30 degrees most of the upwind race. I personally think it looks awesome to see 1/3 of a trimaran out of the water, but that's just me! As per your current predicament. You mentioned a "two boat" approach? I ask why not split the difference and buy a $325k power boat and then you can get a captain's license and rent out rooms on your massive yacht for each hop you're making. Then you'd make money as you went and you'd still have your "online" job!
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Old 21-02-2011, 22:13   #34
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Re: looking for advice on first large ship

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Originally Posted by perchance View Post
Just out of curiosity how much extra weight is that and would it affect the handling of the boat until you burned a good portion of it off?
I litre fresh water = 1 kilogram fuel is slightly lighter
1000 litres = 1000kg

etc
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Old 22-02-2011, 00:19   #35
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

G'day, mates. Diesel fuel has went from roughly $2.80 USD a gallon to $4.40 USD in the last six months in this part of the world. Odds are it's only to keep costing more. The option to use the wind to power us along has made the lifestyle more economically sustainable over the long term. With 300 gallons of diesel capacity, we also have the ability to motor between New Zealand and Tonga, Fiji, Vanuatu, or New Caledonia in light seas if the wind doesn't fill. Cheers.
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Old 22-02-2011, 01:58   #36
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Re: looking for advice on first large ship

Quote:
Originally Posted by scoobert View Post
i have given thought to sailing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by scoobert View Post
i dont like the healing. and i do not like the open cabin.
i am also one person, and many boats need more then 1 to handle them.
i wish i had the money for a 40' nordhaven. that would do it all.

price for fuel. 1000 gallons is 3000. and will take me 2000 miles in good weather. so 40K-50K for a circumnavigation is within reach.


99.98% of everyone who crosses oceans in pleasure boats, does it in a sailboat, not a power boat.

I've got nothing against power boats, but a power boat is simply the wrong tool for a circumnavigation unless you have something extremely specialized (and gigabucks) like Dashew's Wind Horse.

Carrying enough fuel, and the cost of fuel is only one problem.

Another is dependency on your machinery. If you have a twin engine boat you've got some redundancy, but even still, a few hundred hours or more hours between every place of refuge is really pretty risky in my opinion, unless you are a crack diesel mechanic plus crack marine engineer, and have a full workshop with spares on board.

But worst of all is that a 50-odd foot power boat without stabilizers is much less stable and seaworthy in bad weather than either a monohull sailboat or a cat. A monohull has got a few tons of lead in the keel and much less freeboard than a powerboat; a cat has got the wide base between the hulls.

You worry about handling a sailboat alone, but is handling a power boat alone any easier? You also do not want to be crossing oceans alone, I think. It is constant work running any kind of vessel, and human beings need sleep and rest. It can be done, of course, but unless you're trying to prove something, why would you? It will be much more pleasant and much safer with two or better three or four people.



Quote:
Originally Posted by scoobert View Post
thats what i was thinking, was crossing at the coasts. safer in my opinion for bad weather as well. are there major places that way to get fuel? how long is the longest hop? was thinking of Alaska to Russia down to japan.
That would be an interesting trip! Chukotia, Kamchatka, Sakhalin Island -- are some of the wildest and most desolate places on earth. Also some of the harshest weather at such high latitudes. Almost no infrastructure for pleasure boats, hell almost no people. To travel from the U.S. to Japan via Alaska, Kamchatka, Sakhalin and the Kurills is probably one of the hardest ways to cross an ocean, if not THE hardest. You would want an expedition-quality boat and a very good crew for that. Crossing the Pacific via the tradewind route through Australia would be about 1000x easier and safer.


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Originally Posted by scoobert View Post
i had given thought to the cat or tri, someone told me thou they dont heal they will capsize?
Catamarans are much more stable and much less likely to get into trouble in a storm at sea, than a trawler. Much lower center of gravity, much less freeboard, and wider base across the two hulls.

As someone said, a trawler without stabilizers will roll at sea in bad weather as much as any sailboat heels. If you don't like heeling, then a sailing catamaran is what you want.
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Old 22-02-2011, 13:47   #37
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

i guess i will hold off the decision until i take the sailing class.
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Old 22-02-2011, 13:50   #38
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pirate Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

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Originally Posted by scoobert View Post
yes, i have been in huge seas with my 25'.
8-10' seas. rocking so hard when i stopped, i nearly puked.
that was off marthas vineyard.
ROTFLMAO..........
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Old 22-02-2011, 14:48   #39
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship


This 100% biodiesel-powered, 78 ft wave-piercing trimaran aims to set an around-the-world speed record while maintaining a net zero carbon footprint. The Earthrace left Sagunto, Spain, on April 27, and has already made excellent time across the Atlantic, landing in Panama just 8 days later.
Inspired by the desire to “connect with people about the need to get renewable fuels into our energy mix and to inspire them to do something,” the Earthrace has already generated a whirlwind of publicity. Much of this is due to the boat’s eco-technological appeal. It’s been described as “a rally car but for oceans”, with the ability to submerge up to 23 feet underwater while powering through the ocean. The “eco-” part doesn’t just include circling the globe on 100% biodiesel. Parts of the boat are made from a hemp-based composite, bedding foams are made from canola oil, and the operation’s total carbon footprint has been balanced by purchasing carbon credits.
The Earthrace also seems to have pretty good fuel economy for a powerboat. At 6 knots, it can go 24,000 km on one tank of biodiesel, which is over halfway around the world. 6 knots is pretty slow; at a more reasonable cruising speed of 25 knots (29 mph) the powerboat can go 3700 km (2300 miles) on a single tank.
Race rules state that the voyage passes through both the Suez and Panama canals, which makes the fastest route run close to the equator. The crew will make 12 refueling stops along the way in places where biodiesel is available, hoping to beat the previous circumnavigation record of 74 days, 23 hours and 53 minutes set by UK boat ‘Cable & Wireless Adventurer’ in 1998.
This will be Earthrace’s second attempt at breaking the speed record. The team left Barbados in March of last year, but ran into significant mechanical problems that prematurely ended their trip. Let’s hope they have better luck this time.
Check out the Earthrace blog where you can follow along with the voyage. Also check out the sponsorship video (sorry about the gratuitous corporate advertising pitch, just watch the first few minutes to see what the boat looks like):
[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/5VK6nSJCw58" width="425" height="355" wmode="transparent" /]


This 100% biodiesel-powered, 78 ft wave-piercing trimaran aims to set an around-the-world speed record while maintaining a net zero carbon footprint. The Earthrace left Sagunto, Spain, on April 27, and has already made excellent time across the Atlantic, landing in Panama just 8 days later.
Inspired by the desire to “connect with people about the need to get renewable fuels into our energy mix and to inspire them to do something,” the Earthrace has already generated a whirlwind of publicity. Much of this is due to the boat’s eco-technological appeal. It’s been described as “a rally car but for oceans”, with the ability to submerge up to 23 feet underwater while powering through the ocean. The “eco-” part doesn’t just include circling the globe on 100% biodiesel. Parts of the boat are made from a hemp-based composite, bedding foams are made from canola oil, and the operation’s total carbon footprint has been balanced by purchasing carbon credits.
The Earthrace also seems to have pretty good fuel economy for a powerboat. At 6 knots, it can go 24,000 km on one tank of biodiesel, which is over halfway around the world. 6 knots is pretty slow; at a more reasonable cruising speed of 25 knots (29 mph) the powerboat can go 3700 km (2300 miles) on a single tank.
Race rules state that the voyage passes through both the Suez and Panama canals, which makes the fastest route run close to the equator. The crew will make 12 refueling stops along the way in places where biodiesel is available, hoping to beat the previous circumnavigation record of 74 days, 23 hours and 53 minutes set by UK boat ‘Cable & Wireless Adventurer’ in 1998.
This will be Earthrace’s second attempt at breaking the speed record. The team left Barbados in March of last year, but ran into significant mechanical problems that prematurely ended their trip. Let’s hope they have better luck this time.
Check out the Earthrace blog where you can follow along with the voyage. Also check out the sponsorship video (sorry about the gratuitous corporate advertising pitch, just watch the first few minutes to see what the boat looks like):
[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/5VK6nSJCw58" width="425" height="355" wmode="transparent" /]


This 100% biodiesel-powered, 78 ft wave-piercing trimaran aims to set an around-the-world speed record while maintaining a net zero carbon footprint. The Earthrace left Sagunto, Spain, on April 27, and has already made excellent time across the Atlantic, landing in Panama just 8 days later.
Inspired by the desire to “connect with people about the need to get renewable fuels into our energy mix and to inspire them to do something,” the Earthrace has already generated a whirlwind of publicity. Much of this is due to the boat’s eco-technological appeal. It’s been described as “a rally car but for oceans”, with the ability to submerge up to 23 feet underwater while powering through the ocean. The “eco-” part doesn’t just include circling the globe on 100% biodiesel. Parts of the boat are made from a hemp-based composite, bedding foams are made from canola oil, and the operation’s total carbon footprint has been balanced by purchasing carbon credits.
The Earthrace also seems to have pretty good fuel economy for a powerboat. At 6 knots, it can go 24,000 km on one tank of biodiesel, which is over halfway around the world. 6 knots is pretty slow; at a more reasonable cruising speed of 25 knots (29 mph) the powerboat can go 3700 km (2300 miles) on a single tank.
Race rules state that the voyage passes through both the Suez and Panama canals, which makes the fastest route run close to the equator. The crew will make 12 refueling stops along the way in places where biodiesel is available, hoping to beat the previous circumnavigation record of 74 days, 23 hours and 53 minutes set by UK boat ‘Cable & Wireless Adventurer’ in 1998.
This will be Earthrace’s second attempt at breaking the speed record. The team left Barbados in March of last year, but ran into significant mechanical problems that prematurely ended their trip. Let’s hope they have better luck this time.
Check out the Earthrace blog where you can follow along with the voyage. Also check out the sponsorship video (sorry about the gratuitous corporate advertising pitch, just watch the first few minutes to see what the boat looks like):
[kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/5VK6nSJCw58" width="425" height="355" wmode="transparent" /]
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Old 22-02-2011, 16:15   #40
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

G'day, mates. In case you didn't know, Earthrace is sitting on the bottom of the Southern Ocean after it came into contact with a Japanese whaling vessel. Cheers.
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Old 22-02-2011, 17:23   #41
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

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i guess i will hold off the decision until i take the sailing class.
Id reccomend you use the time to view some motor sailors and see what kind of accomaodation they have to offer.

As you can see in my sig, I own a large motoryacht, 57ft long and I can tell you that even if mine had the range I wouldn't think of using it for proper blue water ocean passages. I use mine in the coastal waters near southern Spain and only take her out in moderate conditions at the worst. The main reason for this is that even just for an hour or two the motion can be very unpleasant, never mind a week solid crossing a big sea. Not that a sail boat would be much different, my point is that the idea that a 40-50ft power vessel would give a better ride is simply an illusion. Even huge cruise liners and container ships can get thrown around in the big blue, compared to the ocean, a 40ft trawler is still tiny.

So, if you want to motor most of the time but have sail for long hops, get a motorsailor.

If you want the best combination of space and ride comfort, get a cruising cat'.

Again, best of luck in your search.
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Old 22-02-2011, 17:54   #42
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

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G'day, mates. In case you didn't know, Earthrace is sitting on the bottom of the Southern Ocean after it came into contact with a Japanese whaling vessel. Cheers.
lol. i hate those idiots on whale whores.
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Old 22-02-2011, 19:13   #43
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

it might sound silly, but can any boat be converted to a have a sail?
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Old 22-02-2011, 19:37   #44
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

Scoobert, Have a look at one of these.
Buy & Sell
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Old 22-02-2011, 19:45   #45
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Re: Looking for Advice on First Large Ship

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it might sound silly, but can any boat be converted to a have a sail?
Well I guess you could convert any boat to sail, but about as effectively as converting a VW bug to race in the Daytona 500.
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