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Old 20-01-2012, 12:23   #46
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Re: Life & Voyaging...

It never ceases to amaze me the reaction you get when you tell someone you either live aboard, earn your living at sea or find pleasure in voyaging and passagemaking. Probably, 99.9% of folks have no idea what you are talking about and are unable to understand what your experience base is. The idea of sef sufficiency and self reliance is foreign to most everyone. Those down on their luck in a first world country like America or Canada have a rather sophisticated social safety net to fall back on. Europe an even more extensive one to the point that millions of third world citizens move there illegally to raise their families and live off the welfare of the state in conditions far better than that which they left. This isn't criticism but fact.
I still have a copy of a book written several decades ago called 'The Self-Sufficient Sailor' which outlines what it takes to survive a minimalist existence afloat. It was written long before the days of GPS, EPIRB's and watermakers and catalogues the observations of Smeeton, the Pardeys and other well known maritime pioneers.
It has been my experience that those who have chosen to work and live at sea are more at peace with themselves and their fellow man ashore or afloat.
At the risk of sounding political, I believe that the pervasive philosophy of entitlement we find ashore has truly undermined the self sufficient lifestyle offshore passagemaking requires.
Our political institutions discourage self reliance and foster the general welfare mentality which is probably one of the main reasons many of us flee to sea never to return. Capt Phil
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Old 20-01-2012, 12:55   #47
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Re: Life & Voyaging...

You are correct. Therefore I do not discuss my lifestyle with strangers. It is my family most of all who are appalled about my attitude.
I am reasonably satisfied with my present boat but still looking for a wooden one.

Do not ask me the reason .....
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Old 20-01-2012, 13:29   #48
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Re: Life & Voyaging...

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Originally Posted by msponer View Post
Well, this thread is long past the Sterling Hayden quote, but you guys read him too literal. He's not saying that poverty is good, but that the pursuit of money is a diversion, because the security and toys that money yields are meaningless. .......etc.
That is it in a nutshell (Similar to the Gandhi quote regarding the whole irony).

Too many people I know just don't get my chosen lifestyle. For decades, I was obsessed with making as much as I could with a reasonable $150k income, and buying everything I wanted. A year ago I gave almost everything I had away and bought a boat, and moved onto it. After a few months of further inspiration, I even emptied my storage and gave all that away too. I have little left in the way of items or money, and am happier than I have been in my 50 years. I am currently learning to become a cruiser, to sail south in the next couple years when I think I am ready.

My friends and family think I am crazy. I simply just don't want to spend the next 20-30 years trying to posses more and more things, only to lose it all in death anyway. Material things are no longer important to me. Instead, I will savor life, with little means, and focus on the awesome serenity of the cruising lifestyle. I am learning new skills that will allow me to do most repairs myself, and make a little money here and there for food, parts, etc.

I couldn't do this if I was still obsessed with money, and I think that is what was implied here. I was inspired a couple years ago by a rich multi-millionaire who gave away everything he had, thinking he would be happier without all of the money. He made the news as people don't understand. Some folks will get it, and most won’t. In the end, it just doesn't matter.
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Old 20-01-2012, 15:25   #49
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Re: Life & Voyaging...

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Originally Posted by msponer View Post

David, you really should google Insane Clown Posse (ICP) and re-evaluate your avater.
You really should. You don't want to be taken for a juggalo. Those people are a problem.
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Old 21-01-2012, 12:27   #50
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Re: Life & Voyaging...

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Originally Posted by msponer View Post
Well, this thread is long past the Sterling Hayden quote, but you guys read him too literal. He's not saying that poverty is good, but that the pursuit of money is a diversion, because the security and toys that money yields are meaningless. And then he adds on that there is little time to waste.



Quote:
There is a saying in Tibetan that “at the door of the miserable rich man sleeps the contented beggar.” The point of this saying is not that poverty is a virtue, but that happiness does not come from wealth, but from setting limits to one’s desires, and living within those limits with satisfaction.
Dalai Lama
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Old 21-01-2012, 15:03   #51
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Is it better to have a reason to live or better to have a thing worth dying for?
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Old 21-01-2012, 15:10   #52
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Re: Life & Voyaging...

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Is it better to have a reason to live or better to have a thing worth dying for?
Everybody has a reason to live. It's built into our dna. If that's not enough, then you'd probably need to go find a 'better' reason to live...

Once you're alive, you might find things worth giving that life for. But you won't find those things until you've lived.

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Old 21-01-2012, 16:49   #53
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Re: Life & Voyaging...

Well, I'm not dying for my boat, I'm gonna get a little richer and buy me a life raft.
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Old 21-01-2012, 17:02   #54
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The ones who have think they have nothing to live for never had beer & bar-b-q
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Old 22-01-2012, 06:08   #55
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The idea that money and hapiness are mutually exclusive is ridiculous.

One makes thousands of choices in one's life. Some accumulate choices that make them rich and miserable. Then they give away all their money, buy a crap boat, write a book and tell everyone how miserable "they" are for working for a conglomerate. Bullspit...

I have never "worked a day in my life." My career is awesomely fun. If it wasn't I wouldn't do it. I balance working with many wonderful and enjoyable past-times. When I check out I will have done almost everything I could imagine I wanted to do.

When I was 8 I lived in a condemned building. We broke up the furniture one winter for firewood. I never understood I was poor but I understood I didn't want to break up furniture for heat and cooking. Later in life I saw poverty in Asia. I was never as poor as some in Asia and I suspect Asians are a lot better off than some Africans. My difference is that I could work at a crap job and get a cheap education. I also lived in the west that even "had" the industry I eventually worked in. Yes, I was born in a land of opportunity but I had to get off my butt and convert the opportunity.

I have worked for a Dow top 10 company for 30 years. My sister tells me I am miserable. She is wrong. I am so lucky and happy!
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Old 22-01-2012, 06:41   #56
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pirate Re: Life & Voyaging ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ex-Calif View Post
The idea that money and hapiness are mutually exclusive is ridiculous.

One makes thousands of choices in one's life. Some accumulate choices that make them rich and miserable. Then they give away all their money, buy a crap boat, write a book and tell everyone how miserable "they" are for working for a conglomerate. Bullspit...

I have never "worked a day in my life." My career is awesomely fun. If it wasn't I wouldn't do it. I balance working with many wonderful and enjoyable past-times. When I check out I will have done almost everything I could imagine I wanted to do.

When I was 8 I lived in a condemned building. We broke up the furniture one winter for firewood. I never understood I was poor but I understood I didn't want to break up furniture for heat and cooking. Later in life I saw poverty in Asia. I was never as poor as some in Asia and I suspect Asians are a lot better off than some Africans. My difference is that I could work at a crap job and get a cheap education. I also lived in the west that even "had" the industry I eventually worked in. Yes, I was born in a land of opportunity but I had to get off my butt and convert the opportunity.

I have worked for a Dow top 10 company for 30 years. My sister tells me I am miserable. She is wrong. I am so lucky and happy!
Way to go...
There are many paths up the mountain...
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Old 22-01-2012, 08:11   #57
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Re: Life & Voyaging ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ex-Calif View Post
The idea that money and hapiness are mutually exclusive is ridiculous.

One makes thousands of choices in one's life. Some accumulate choices that make them rich and miserable. Then they give away all their money, buy a crap boat, write a book and tell everyone how miserable "they" are for working for a conglomerate. Bullspit...

I have never "worked a day in my life." My career is awesomely fun. If it wasn't I wouldn't do it. I balance working with many wonderful and enjoyable past-times. When I check out I will have done almost everything I could imagine I wanted to do.

When I was 8 I lived in a condemned building. We broke up the furniture one winter for firewood. I never understood I was poor but I understood I didn't want to break up furniture for heat and cooking. Later in life I saw poverty in Asia. I was never as poor as some in Asia and I suspect Asians are a lot better off than some Africans. My difference is that I could work at a crap job and get a cheap education. I also lived in the west that even "had" the industry I eventually worked in. Yes, I was born in a land of opportunity but I had to get off my butt and convert the opportunity.

I have worked for a Dow top 10 company for 30 years. My sister tells me I am miserable. She is wrong. I am so lucky and happy!
i'm 48 and live in a condemmed building,or should be,bloody landlords!!!!!
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Old 22-01-2012, 09:12   #58
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Re: Life & Voyaging ...

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Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
Way to go...
There are many paths up the mountain...
Spot on Boatman! As the Grateful Dead song goes:

"There is a road, no simple highway,
Between the dawn and the dark of night,
And if you go no one may follow,
That path is for your steps alone"


I can also certainly understand Hayden's thoughts especially after spending so much time on board myself and knowing how it has influenced and continues to influence how I spend time on land. Though even Hayden came back to land on occassion to go to work (if you can call acting in Hollywood work). It's all a balance between wants and needs and for me my time spent on my boat has shown me that my needs can be pretty basic and has lead to a much happier life and a number of "pinch me" moments that I never would have experienced if I spent more time on land. Yes, there are things I can do now that I could not do when I was younger and there are things I won't do now that I could do when I was younger. Somewhere between those two thoughts is my comfort zone. That zone IMO is different for each person and that zone has changing parameters, at least for me. Things I once wanted to do when I was younger, do not compel me as much as they once did. But, they are not regrets either. Others like this fellow just make the leap to follow their dream:
THE BIANKA LOG BLOG: BETWEEN HOME AND COMFORT ZONES
I and expect others draw inspiration from him and others like him as we make our future plans.
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Old 22-01-2012, 09:57   #59
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Re: Life & Voyaging ...

What seems to be ringing through all of these posts is a degree of contentment with ones lot in life. Those that find find happiness in awaking to a morning sunrise on the ocean seem to have a special connection with this world that others cannot or will not understand. We are the lucky ones... we deal with adversity confident that tomorrow will be better, help those among us who are dealing with difficulty and don't expect anything in return but their company and we never lose sight of the fact that we are truly fortunate no matter how much we have or don't have. Life is good! Cheers, Capt Phil
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