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Old 28-02-2008, 12:50   #31
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Of course, there are many Navy sailors that don't know a mast from a telephone pole but, honest, they are not all that way.
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Old 28-02-2008, 14:16   #32
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I don't even know where to start with this. There are Navy and former-navy types on this forum, who'll take offence to this slander. You've clearly never been on a warship, and I doubt you've even met any sailors. I don't know what your prejudice stems from, but would advise that you refrain from insulting the vast majority in the Navy who serve their country with honour.
Kevin
Actually Kevin (and others) I've been on warships many many times hence the seasick and rolling comment. Some of those are mongrol boats in a sea.

I married the daughter of the longest serving member of our Navy, was the Commodore of the Navy Sailing Club (the only civilian in it's history), spent over 20 years living within 1000mts of our biggest navy base, got married on a Navy base and the list goes on. My children are in a programme where they get checked for things medical due to their grandfather being sprayed with Agent Orange and he was on a frigate at the Nuke testing protest many years back when the Nth Hemisphere was crapping in our back yard not their own.

Due to this I am well aware many joining the Navy can't swim and know sweet bugger all about boats. A very large proportion of people joining our Navy come from rural backgrounds and tend to get less opportunity to swim and boat like us who live next to the sea. Some learn, some don't.

The drinking comment was made as it happens and is an issue our navy has as I suspect many navies would have. Sure mostly the young fellas more than the older, usually. I'd be very surprised to find that is not a common situation in most if not all Navies and probably all armed forces actually.

Where I live, work and play the Navy is everywhere, always has been. I do work on their yachts, have raced their yachts in Inter-Services (usually a fantastic if not overly alcohol fuelled event) and Inter-Navy regattas, which we won each time by the way. Only a month ago we kicked the Aussie and English Navies arses in a Race Week, go the boys. I have and still do spend evenings at the Senior Rates mess as well as the Jnr Rates mess (and it often becomes a big mess, lots of fun)

The truth is not slanderous or shows any prejudice, sorry. If you find the truth an insult I'm sorry but that's your issue not mine.

Personally I don't have any issue with our or anyones navy. In fact I seriously thought about joining many years back and later today I'm going to be a reference for one of my younger staff members who wants to join, which I'm actively encouraging as I think it would be good for him and he for the Navy.

And I never said any 'sailors' didn't do their job well, weren't proud of what the do for our country or anything along those lines.

I will say however, Yes I'd happily let some Navy I know take my boat out but there is many I wouldn't even let use my dingy.

Holding Pattern - good post.
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Old 28-02-2008, 14:25   #33
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I am not pushy or a braggert, however, am opinionated. I have many friends who are the same.
Aren't many of us

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None of us ever wanted to be discriminated against or demeaned while we were in uniform but we often were.
I'd agree completely with you, I've seen it many times. But rest assured I'm not one of them.
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Old 28-02-2008, 17:41   #34
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I know this is going to offend a lot of the politically correct readers...

To us who have actually spent our lives working on boats there is a term used to describe ourselves...it's "Boat ******."

There is even a group called the IBNA "International Boat ****** Association" complete with a burgee.

Why the "N Word?"

Can you think of any other occupation where workers refer to their bosses as "my owner?"

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Old 28-02-2008, 18:02   #35
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And before the thread is locked, you Navy guys should hear about this:

My brother in law finished up serving in the Navy recently. Did he serve in Iraq? Yup. Did he serve in Afganistan? Yup. So what kind of hard, seamanlike job did this kid from NY have?

BAR TENDER!!!

You heard me right. They gave him the job of pouring beers. Lucky guy... ha ha

He's in the See-Bees (if I spelled that right). When he wasn't pouring drinks, he was tacking together 2x4's to make shelters for whatever.

An example of a funny story and a guy that wasn't so "water based." In fact, he's never been on a boat, ship or anything.
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Old 28-02-2008, 18:42   #36
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As I remeber when crusing ~20 years ago the Pardey's in one of there books said something like, "Yachtie's is a term we don't like." I used it quite a bit as a generic term to describe people on boats in general. I especially liked using it in reference to this one guy who was offended by it. LOL I only met two peopl between Mexico and Australia who were offended by it.
Ya...well, you had to know the Pardey's to appreciate that comment.

Typically, when they arrived in port, they took their suit cases and headed for the local hotel. I never once saw them sit down and have a beer with us, "Yachties" in a foreign port. I saw this in New Zealand, Fiji and South Africa.
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Old 28-02-2008, 19:25   #37
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Typically, when they arrived in port, they took their suit cases and headed for the local hotel.
Is that like all the boats that 'cruise' from marina to marina.
Isn't that just the same as backpacking from the Sheraton to the Hilton
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Old 28-02-2008, 19:39   #38
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Well, we always called boats that are big, motored, and usually going fast where they should be more considerate, as "pukers". To me, a yachtie is a puker. However, our boat, though it's a sailin' boat, does have an engine, and we use it when we get impatient, (and we're not commercial fishing folks, which is the opposite of pukers). At those times, you could probably call me a yachtie and I'd bow my head and accept it. To me, a yachtie is one who is not too concerned about others, will pass you at 10 knots in a tight cut by a bridge, and will leave a huge wake when none is needed. Wearing a blue blazer is not required--just being inconsiderate.
Now I've said all that, I guess it definitely IS a derogatory term to me. Call me a yachtie and I'll sling a water balloon at ya! Or send you a digital message.
Call me a sailor and maybe I'll offer you a beer.
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Old 28-02-2008, 19:45   #39
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To me, a yachtie is one who is not too concerned about others, will pass you at 10 knots in a tight cut by a bridge, and will leave a huge wake when none is needed. Wearing a blue blazer is not required--just being inconsiderate.
Here they are called 'dickheads' and the boat won't have sails
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Old 28-02-2008, 20:27   #40
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Yachtie...schmachtie....I don't care.....
I get more po'd at PhD's who own boats that insist I call them "Doctor"<pitooey>
Before I got into this field I was in a line of work where Letters after your name were IMPORTANT....what a bunch of hooey. BA,MA,CDC,MSW,L-CSW,ESQ, NE14U
My customers who are M.D.s wanna go on a first name basis.
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Old 29-02-2008, 12:16   #41
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Actually Kevin (and others) I've been on warships many many times hence the seasick and rolling comment. Some of those are mongrol boats in a sea.
I wonder what class(es) of ship you refer to? I know your current frigates are based on Meko's and previously you had Leander's - both have been used by many navies and have excellent reputations for their seakeeping abilities. Never sailed on either type, but have plenty of experience in mountainous seas in similar-sized vessels. It's a fact that warships are not built for comfort - speed and manoeuvrability are their desired traits, but excellent seakeeping traits are usually a direct side benefit of warship design. Warships generally have gobs of power, twin screws, massive rudder(s), bilge rails and/or active stabilisers. Your observation may simply be due to the fact that warships will often put to sea in conditions that no-one else will (often to rescue 'yacties').

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I married the daughter of the longest serving member of our Navy
Have you told your father-in-law that he's a drunk arse who gets seasick and doesn't know anything about seagoing boats? Have you shared this opinion of him with your wife? I'm curious because women often marry men that are like their fathers.

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he was on a frigate at the Nuke testing protest many years back when the Nth Hemisphere was crapping in our back yard not their own.
There you go with the broad brush again - there are only a handful of nuclear powers, so the majority of the Nth Hemisphere is NOT crapping in your backyard, thank you very much.

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Due to this I am well aware many joining the Navy can't swim and know sweet bugger all about boats. A very large proportion of people joining our Navy come from rural backgrounds and tend to get less opportunity to swim and boat like us who live next to the sea. Some learn, some don't.
Well you could say this about the general populace as a whole, since this is from where the Navy recruits. "A very large proportion of Kiwis come from rural backgrounds and tend to get less opportunity to swim and boat like those who live next to the sea. Some learn, some don't."

Quote:
The drinking comment was made as it happens and is an issue our navy has as I suspect many navies would have. Sure mostly the young fellas more than the older, usually. I'd be very surprised to find that is not a common situation in most if not all Navies and probably all armed forces actually.
Have you ever been to a university town? Young adults like to drink! Lots! Go figure! Heck, put any group of people together in close confines, have them work long, hard hours; spend extended times away from home; encourage teamwork and esprit de corps and see if alcohol is not involved in their celebrations. Try to convince me that rugby teams don't go out on piss-ups down-under. I think you'll find that most Western navies, much like Western societies these days, tend to encourage healthier lifestyle choices and discourage excessive drinking.

Quote:
Where I live, work and play the Navy is everywhere, always has been. I do work on their yachts, have raced their yachts in Inter-Services (usually a fantastic if not overly alcohol fuelled event) and Inter-Navy regattas, which we won each time by the way. Only a month ago we kicked the Aussie and English Navies arses in a Race Week, go the boys. I have and still do spend evenings at the Senior Rates mess as well as the Jnr Rates mess (and it often becomes a big mess, lots of fun)
Now you admit to your own involvement in drinking events - of course you're not a drunken arse; alcohol surely makes you more charming, witty and erudite than you already are

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The truth is not slanderous or shows any prejudice, sorry. If you find the truth an insult I'm sorry but that's your issue not mine.

And I never said any 'sailors' didn't do their job well, weren't proud of what the do for our country or anything along those lines.
Sorry, but when I read this:
Quote:
A Sailor is in the Navy. They don't know anything about yachts and very little about any seagoing boat actually. They usually can'r even swim and are throwing up 1Nm from the wharf, mind you those warships rock n roll very badly so that is a bit understandable. A Sailor is usually in uniform so easily spotted. If not in uniform they are again usually easily spotted as they are drunk and making arses of them selves.
I didn't see where you said "most" or "not all" sailors. As written, it's a generalisation - that is, it's implied that most, if not all sailors are puking, drunken arses, who know very little about boats. If you can't see how someone in the Navy would find that insulting, then you are truly an idiot.
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Old 29-02-2008, 12:25   #42
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Yachtie...schmachtie....I don't care.....
I get more po'd at PhD's who own boats that insist I call them "Doctor"<pitooey>
Before I got into this field I was in a line of work where Letters after your name were IMPORTANT....what a bunch of hooey. BA,MA,CDC,MSW,L-CSW,ESQ, NE14U
My customers who are M.D.s wanna go on a first name basis.
Driftin away... (thread drift):

Ha! I would never call someone "doctor" after the 1st intro, be it PhD, Med, Stephen Hawking, the US Surgeon General, or Dr Who.

We had a "doctor" (he wanted to be called that) come out to see our boat when it was for sale. Very fancy guy, but he had trouble coming up with the deposit.

If anyone is so self-absorbed as to bring their professional title to the water, you probably don't want to talk to them anyway.
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Old 29-02-2008, 12:53   #43
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I wondered why this thread had kept going.........so dropped in for a look .

I would share my "Navy" story - but it seems that some peoples are soooooooo sensitive to being told that others know the world is not flat..........

Yachtie? Meangingless / harmless..........but "Sailor" just sounds so YMCA
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Old 29-02-2008, 13:12   #44
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I like the term Sailor, never had anyone call me a yachtie ?? Not sure if that is good or bad. Enjoy it when I hear someone say "hey Sailor" as long as it is NOT anyone from the YMCA.

Whether or not this thread is banging on the navy, the thing to remember about navy personnel is they are us. The military is a microcosm of society, demonstrating some of the best and some of the worst traits. They don't pop out of thin air, they are someones son/daughter/brother/sister/father/mother. If they act good congratulate them,if they act bad punish them. Just like anyone else.

Bill
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Old 29-02-2008, 13:42   #45
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Enjoy it when I hear someone say "hey Sailor" as long as it is NOT anyone from the YMCA.

Reminds me of the time we pulled into Provincetown, MA with my boat once. It was my wife and I on my old O'day 302.

We pull up to the dock and I jump off to start handling lines, when all of a sudden this guy comes flying - and I mean *flying* over to help with lines and stuff. He's all like, "Hey sssssailor! Where you from? Where you going?" etc... etc...

He's one of the most helpful guys on the dock I'd ever met, even though he's dressed in fancy sandals and a "Gilligan Hat."

Then my wife hops off the boat.

The guy takes one good look at her, makes a funny face at her and vanishes. ha ha

I seem to have a problem with this. It happens in grocery stores and stuff too. My wife likes to laugh at me about it.
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