Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 24-09-2007, 19:48   #16
cruiser

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Tampa to New York
Boat: Morgan 33 OutIsland, Magic and 33' offshore scott design "Cutting Edge"
Posts: 1,594
Kim and I partially disassemble ours and they fit on a shelf in the setee. Our morgan 33 outislander is pretty roomy inside. the wheels and tires go into a hanging locker. I have a 27"fuji racer and she has a schwinn aluminum frame bike with similiar size tires in metric. Hers is better suited as it came with stainless spokes and very little ferrous metal. I made some nice backpacks with plenty of reflective tape. We often travel over a hundred miles a week as this is our only land based transport.The hardest part is the dingy ride ashore with them but Im working on a rack that doesnt interfere with the dingies rig. Now I lay them across the bow and only use the main when sailing in dingy with bikes. The rack will extend off stern behind boom.
__________________

__________________
forsailbyowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2007, 20:03   #17
Registered User
 
sluissa's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pensacola, FL, US
Boat: Westfield UK Kingfisher 20+ - Rabbit
Posts: 402
Images: 4
Send a message via AIM to sluissa
I remember reading something, possibly on here, or somewhere else, not sure. Anyway, that person bought a cheapo bike from a yard sale, for 20 bucks or so. Took a hacksaw to it and cut it in half. They then rigged something up so that they could refit the bike together with just a couple of locking pins or something of that sort. (sort of like those S&S threaded things someone mentioned earlier, but more Macguyverish) They said the thing broke apart after 6 months or a year of moderate use, but since the total cost was around 25 bucks they just bought another yard sale bike and did the same again.
__________________

__________________
sluissa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2007, 20:22   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: North Carolina
Boat: 44 footer
Posts: 923
Good idea that... My Bianchi however will remain un-chopped. (Grin)

I've got a welder, and machine shop up at work...

Wonder if the triton's engine compartment would hold a bike! (Did I really just say that?)
__________________
Zach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-09-2007, 23:49   #19
Senior Cruiser
 
roverhi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kona, Hawaii, Carlsbad, CA
Boat: 1969 Pearson 35 #108 & 1976 Sabre 28
Posts: 6,003
Send a message via Yahoo to roverhi
If you are serious about riding, look at a Bike Friday <bikefriday.com>. They are small wheels but serious bicycles. Rims are 405 for the touring/offroad designs and 451 for the serious road types. All sorts of sophisticated treads are available for those wheels except sew-ups. They make a variety of designs from off-road, touring, road, suspension types, both on and off-road, tandem, tridem (2 adults and a kid) and recumbent. All fold up into a suitcase(s) that can be turned into a trailer and towed behind the bike. Bike will ship as luggage on the airlines with no sur-charge.

Technically, the bikes are not 'folders'. Some disassembly required to fit in the suitcase but it's very well thought out and can go from road to luggage in about 15 minutes. For the boat, they have a storage bag which requires little disassembly yet still folds to a pretty small package. The bag protects the bike from spray when rowing ashore and protects the boat when stowing on deck at anchor or in the forepeak underway.

I've got the NWT (touring model) and it rides just as well as my full sized road bike, actually a little more comfortable. About the only way you know it's got small wheels is it accelerates faster and handles a little quicker because of less inertia and gyro effect in the wheels. I've done a couple of 50+ mile rides and getting around when I'm on the boat. Seems to scoot along pretty well but I haven't been doing any serious conditioning to set any speed records. LeMond can feel safe in retirement.

They are basically a custom bike so can be ordered in all sorts of different configurations and groupo levels. They are regularly listed on Ebay if you want to save a little money but they seem to hold their value pretty well so still aren't cheap.

Aloha
Peter O.
__________________
roverhi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 04:51   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Galveston
Boat: C&C 27
Posts: 724
What is the latest on composit frames and other materials that might make much of the corrosion problem go away?
__________________
Pura Vida is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 05:03   #21
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: North Carolina
Boat: 44 footer
Posts: 923
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pura Vida View Post
What is the latest on composit frames and other materials that might make much of the corrosion problem go away?
Carbon fiber, though all the threaded bits are aluminum sleeves.

Titanium would be the best bet.

I'm thinking a powdercoated steel frame with a bunch of oil running around inside might be a solution.
__________________
Zach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 11:45   #22
Senior Cruiser
 
S/V Antares's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Annapolis, Bahamas
Boat: 1983 Gulfstar 36
Posts: 1,249
Images: 1
Deals on Weels

Wow, the tube connectors are very nice.

Anyone out there ever use a Segway? Know how they really hold up? I rented one in seattle and did not want to give it back. You could put it in a plastic trash bag. It would be fun and stow well but they are very pricey. $4K
__________________
Will & Muffin
Lucy the dog

"Yes, well.. perhaps some more wine" (Julia Child)
S/V Antares is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 12:24   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Los Angeles/St Petersburg Florida
Boat: Gemini Cat Hull #100
Posts: 56
We are living on the water now and have our bikes. Before we go underway we coat the exposed metal with a wax like coca butter then lash the bikes down to the deck. (be careful as they like to grab anything that gets close to them from a luffing sail to your ankles)
We have the Walmart inexpensive bikes, and only wish we would have opted for a stainless chain as the chain rusts up really badly when chained to the bike stand. We started out with folding bikes but they were simply too heavy and rusted even worse. These cheap bikes are very light and as someone said "disposable" The bike is not lashed in this photo
as somone said disposable.
__________________
Ativa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 15:46   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 125
I am an avid cyclist, 8000 km/y.

My bike frame is entirely aluminum, the rims and spokes are aluminuim, the bearings are sealed cartridge bearings 316 SS with ceramic balls.

Stepping through all the parts, all are corrosion resistant, except for.

The chain, I am quite sure that slathering some vasoline on it would work, I would just remove the chain, and seat and store them below. I do have a 100% titanium chain but that ain't staying outside anyway.

I think for a 7 day sail I would remove the wheels, and store in a locker, I have wheel bags.

I would get a couple of quick release clamps and attach these to the outer hull, then I would clamp the bike on and go.

For an ocean passage I would get a bike case, and store in a locker.

The bike transport cases are for airplanes, these cost about $150 I think and are robust plastic cases, that have fittings for all the wheels etc inside. See JensonUSA.

Lastly there is a Lapierre Mountain bike that is designed to fold into a case, This bike is a very good bike, not to be compared with the classic foldable bike.

I have not done this as yet because all of my sailing vacations have been very sail oriented, and all of my bike vacations have been very bike oriented, and neither have been for very long times. (I guess I am a little too focused at times)
__________________
jscott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 16:27   #25
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
Did I hear mention of a SparkBook notebook?? Wow! I never even knew those existed! I was on SparcStations at the time, but I had never seen a portable version. Neat.

(Sorry for the thread drift.)
__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 16:28   #26
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Galveston
Boat: C&C 27
Posts: 724
Check this out...
http://www.cncpolymers.com/?gclid=CK...FRceYQod_37vTA

I may see if I can find one to fit my folder.
__________________
Pura Vida is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 18:02   #27
Senior Cruiser
 
44'cruisingcat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,454
Images: 69
Room for two bikes and plenty more in here..

__________________
44'cruisingcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 18:23   #28
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 4,525
Quote:
Originally Posted by 44'cruisingcat View Post
Room for two bikes and plenty more in here..


It's a nice boat, but hauling bikes in and out of an area below decks like that would get tiring very quickly. It's enough work just loading them into the dinghy and bringing them ashore. Getting them in and out of that bow locker would be back breaking.
__________________
ssullivan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 20:05   #29
Registered User
 
Microship's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: living aboard in Friday Harbor, WA
Boat: Vic Franck Delta 50
Posts: 699
Images: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssullivan View Post
Did I hear mention of a SparkBook notebook?? Wow! I never even knew those existed! I was on SparcStations at the time, but I had never seen a portable version. Neat.

(Sorry for the thread drift.)
No thread drift at all, actually... I was riding a unixcycle! The aluminum case behind the seat had a custom repackaged SPARCstation with a prototype color LCD driver, and the Tadpole SPARCbook is sitting on the solar panels in the photo below, showing the BEHEMOTH in its final form, circa 1991... pretty much at the end of the journey. There's a quick list of components over yonder; going into too much detail would count as thread drift!

The bike now resides at the Computer History Museum... it probably wouldn't fit on my boat anyway (13 feet long, including trailer). But maybe with those folding couplers........

Cheers!
Steve
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	beh-fullsystem-sm.jpg
Views:	71
Size:	150.2 KB
ID:	1874  
__________________
M/V Datawake
Nomadic Research Labs
Microship is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2007, 20:10   #30
Senior Cruiser
 
44'cruisingcat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,454
Images: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssullivan View Post
It's a nice boat, but hauling bikes in and out of an area below decks like that would get tiring very quickly. It's enough work just loading them into the dinghy and bringing them ashore. Getting them in and out of that bow locker would be back breaking.

It's easy. Maybe our bikes are light, (I doubt it, they are not alloy framed or anything) but it's no trouble at all. I take the front wheel off (quick release) and I can easily lift them in and out with one hand.
__________________

__________________
44'cruisingcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 15:48.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.