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Old 27-12-2007, 13:49   #16
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Originally Posted by Seeratlas View Post
A professor at Caregie Mellon who is dying of cancer, recently gave a rather remarkable lecture in which he said many things worth hearing among which was this one which resonated most with me." Walls (i.e. obstacles to your dreams) are there to weed out those who simply don't 'want it' enough". I have seen this to be true. If you really want it, GO FOR IT! If you don't, keep searching
I was moved by reading of the Carnegie Mellon computer-science professor in The Wall Street Journal last September, and saved the page. Here's a link to the original article: Moving On - WSJ.com

Worth everyone's time to read, I think.

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Old 27-12-2007, 13:59   #17
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the Last Lecture

If you search "last lecture Carnegie Mellon" on youtube you will find this speech in several parts. If you have not seen it, I would second Mr. Jones' recommendation but advise you to instead of reading a review, watch the thing as it was given. I don't know if he is still alive, but this was/is one impressive educator, and in my mind, a considerable man.

seer

oh, you can see the whole thing here also
Randy Pausch's Last Lecture - UPDATE | ETC Global News
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Old 27-12-2007, 14:15   #18
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I don't know if he is still alive, but this was/is one impressive educator, and in my mind, a considerable man.
He is indeed still alive, and the December 23, 2007 posting on his website stated that chemotherapy had, essentially, stopped his tumors in their present condition, giving him perhaps 3-4 more months to live.

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Old 27-12-2007, 19:02   #19
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Wow! Liberty16, …. You really tapped into some well seasoned advice and also some soul searching on a moonless night.
My career advice is simple and short: “Identify what it is you really like doing and then figure a way to make money at it”
Odds are you will be more successful than others because you are doing something you love, but if not at least your life will have been happy.
I will however, comment on a few digs some have made on the private Superyacht Industry.
Having reached the pinnacle of that industry in both project management and operations, I can tell you that the Owners are not “bone idle” or that they favour “yes men.”
It can be an incredible industry where the individual is inspired to always seek perfection and be given the tools to achieve it. Where the Owner’s who have reached the very top of their own global business can by association, teach you the methods and determination to achieve your own.
For me, after university I discovered that I loved the water and I enjoyed being around happy people more than anything. So I simply decided to become a “water sports specialist” who would help to fulfil their waterborne dreams, while they helped me to actually live my own. It is a decision I never regretted.
Good luck!
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Old 27-12-2007, 19:26   #20
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We have waited until our mid 40's to finally buy the boat we will live on for the rest of our lives but my oldest son has done it differently. He works at the local boat yard and recently bought his first boat. He only paid $600 for it so... He has access to free haul outs and unlimited advice and tools. He has a full quiver of sails and may make it out before us!!

There is no right way to do it. Just do it.
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Old 27-12-2007, 20:24   #21
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There is some good stuff in this thread. I think the advice given by Pelagic and Starfish62 is the most succinct in reply to the original post and worth taking in.

The real question I think you need to ask yourself is, what do I want to get out of a cruising lifestyle. This question isn't as simple as it may seem and is the reason that you may get a myriad of very different answers from experienced people without necessarily getting the most helpful answer. Is it that you enjoy the idea of spending time just floating at anchor in a boat existing? Is getting the most speed out of a boat the thing that really does it for you? Is it travelling to far away places that gets you exited, or would you rather spend endless days exploring up little creeks? Is it a combination of all or some of those things, or something else entirely?

My advice on a sea based career, if you feel that is important, would be as an officer in the merchant marine. There is no point aiming at a position with a low cap if you are going to head in that direction. Being private enterprise, the Merchant marine will also teach you business sense and at the end of it you could earn very good money as a ships harbour pilot when you have had enough of the big sea. If you don't want to go down that route, I would advise on doing anything in life that gives you enjoyment and work out how to add the cruiser lifestyle around it as you go. You will probably find that your idea of what constitutes the ideal cruiser lifestyle will change as you grow, develop and experience different things.

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Old 27-12-2007, 20:29   #22
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[quote=Pelagic;121637] I can tell you that the Owners are not “bone idle” quote]

Yes, I know. I was just being naughty

Quote:
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“Identify what it is you really like doing and then figure a way to make money at it”


I took your advice 20 years ago... but must have stuffed it up: I said to myself "what are the 3 jobs you could do if you were never paid for them?"
I listed them and did them I've had a great time and now we are about to rent our house out and go.

But if I was 21 again the 3 things may have been different!
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Old 28-12-2007, 09:21   #23
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Wow, some amazing advice, thanks for your replies.

Several things stick out in my mind: that I should lead different lives and appreciate all of them, that I have a free-pass til 30, that I should "go small, go now," that I should try many things and figure out how I fit into this world, that I should "don't hit anything, and don't fall off." These are great!

I've read much philosophy and I truly believe that Youth is a great gift that we all lose, and Life is a great gift that we all lose. I don't want to squander it, so I've paid great mind to the wisdom of elders. I'll have to give it much more thought, but I certainly won't worry over it, as they say: on his death bed, no man ever wished he had worked more or made more money. Randy Pausch's last lecture is fantastic.
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Old 28-12-2007, 10:29   #24
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Just a quick note, the environment in the Coast Guard and Navy have change a lot. There are lot of people with a lot of years invested getting out. The Coast Guard used to be a lot of fun and I was quick to recomend it but now its moving heavily to port security, the want-to-be Marines. There are still some good situations in both services but be carful you don't get stuck in a sucky job. Of course any experience you can look back on fondly, but don't believe your recruiter, really.
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Old 28-12-2007, 16:12   #25
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I'm not in any position to give advice, as generally I know just enough to be a menace to society... but when I mull through this question heres the answer I most often find. (The other one involves a passion for sports cars and automobile restoration... the two lifestyles don't mix.)

I'm 20. Bought the boat in July. Fixing it up, 2 years left on the degree... taking that time to save up enough to head out. I don't make much, but my expenses are low and lots goes into savings.

My thoughts are that with compound interest on our side, we can put 3k into a Roth IRA every year and end up with a tidy nest egg for retirement. Might not have a lot of assets by then, but plenty of adventures!

The alternative is to work for twenty years, sell it all and buy a bigger boat... blow everything cruising at a higher level of comfort, leaving a a little nest egg for retirement.
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Old 28-12-2007, 17:26   #26
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I'll have to give it much more thought, but I certainly won't worry over it, as they say: on his death bed, no man ever wished he had worked more or made more money. Randy Pausch's last lecture is fantastic.
I like to tell people, "What if this is heaven?" So you die and meet the "maker" and he says, "What's wrong with you? I gave you an entire planet with unlimited opportunity and you spent your whole life , waiting for retirement to have fun, and then you died right away. But's that's OK because you're thinking , I'll get my reward in heaven. Boy are you a dumbass."

I do what I love - It has its frustrations but that's why they call it work - All the best 4-letter words were already used.

With an Anthropology degree and some hard work, I bet you could get on in an environmental agency doing field work. The environment is a huge growth industry. It's predominantly research but I think if you could get out in the field it would be a cool career.

My nephew is finishing his last year and has interned with Alaska Wildlife. He has been "transported" on his own to remote Alaskan villages to conduct census and count mooose and stuff like that. Pretty interesting stuff.
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Old 28-12-2007, 20:32   #27
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Liberty16,
Majoring in Anthropology doesn't really set you up well for any particular career choice unless you are really good and can get a job as a forensic anthropoligist for an agency like the FBI. Our younger son was in his fifth year of college in Anthropology when he decided he wanted to become a chef instead. After 18 more months of school, he is now working at a job he really likes but that doesn't pay much. Many of his anthro classmates are driving trucks.

In April 2003 immediately after my doctor told me I had prostate cancer, I realized that life is too short not to enjoy it. Hence my decision to retire and cruise as soon as I could do it in a degree of comfort my wife would accept. I am now cancer free living my dream.

If I were 21 again I would seize the opportunity presented to me the first time I was 21 - attend the Armed Forces Medical School and become a doctor. Had I done that, however, I most likely would not be where I am today (aboard my beautiful 43 foot catamaran anchored in San Carlos Bay, Sonora, Mexico) because I probably would not have met my wife who was very instrumental in helping me achieve my dream. This may sound contradictory so please read on for clarification.

My background briefly to help put this reply in perspective:
Attended US Naval Academy right out of high school;
Served 20 years in nuclear submarines before retiring;
Worked 15 more years at Hanford Nuclear Reservation in central Washington State before retiring a second time shortly before my 56th birthday;
Started cruising full time two weeks after my 56th birthday.

My Navy pension pretty much pays for the mortgage and insurance on the boat and the Hanford pension covers most other expenses. The wife still works part time from the boat for grocery money. So far after cruising from Seattle around Vancouver Island, down the U.S. West Coast, around the Baja Penninsula, and along the Mexican West Coast for two years, we have been able to cover all but about $10,000 of our cruising expenses, including some pricey upgrades to the boat, with the income mentioned above. I feel like we are doing quite well as that ten grand came from earnings on my retirement funds (not principle) accumulated during my second career.

BOTTOM LINE: The military is one of the few industries in which a person can still be reasonably certain of receiving a pension.

Just a word of advice regardless of what career you choose, start saving for retirement immediately. If you set up an automatic payroll deduction to a 401K plan at your first job, you will quickly learn to live on the rest of your income. In several years you will be miles ahead of most of your peers in developing a nest egg. Our older son has accumulated around $100,000 in his 401K after working only six years.

To correct what David M stated, if you become an officer in the Navy (other than a flyer) you will have plenty of experience in boats plus you will learn a great deal about vessel maintenance. I don't know if OCS teaches sailing but USNA includes at least a dozen hours of sailing instruction in the first summer indoctrination. The rationale is that an officer of the deck who understands how sailors think will be better prepared to maneuver his ship intelligently should he meet a sailboat underway.
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Old 28-12-2007, 22:32   #28
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I work in software development. I was in the Navy, went to school, got into software, joined a band and played shows all around the country, went back to software, did a morning show on a radio station, went back to software, did a bunch of sailing for a year, went back to software, bought a new boat, and am back to software again.

It's a great gig. I get paid well, I have great job security, I can travel anywhere, and since I've been doing it for a while I can even go into teaching at this point.

If I was 21 again, I'd pretty much do the same thing that I did before. I had my eye on my career, and got a lot of experience. I took jobs that required travel and staying in remote locations, because I didn't have a family at that point. I met a lot of people (girls included, of course), and did some amazing things. But I kept my resume alive at the same time. Fast forward ten years, and on paper it looks like I had a solid career going, when in reality I had a lot of "me" time in there.

In software one of the tricks is that you and your friends always have pet projects you're working on: someone always has an idea, and no money, so you work for free. Maybe 10 hours a week. Do that while you're sailing, backpacking in Europe, or whatever. You keep your skills sharp, and you have on your resume that you were doing that for a year, not backpacking.

Have a career that allows you to make a bunch of money, and is flexible so you can come and go as you wish. I wouldn't recommend software development; that's a field that picks you, you really don't pick it. You'd already now if you were a software geek.
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Old 28-12-2007, 22:38   #29
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Also, I wouldn't spend my career in the Navy or any other branch for that matter. I put my time in, and my old man did three tours of duty as a fighter pilot for the Marines in Vietnam. I didn't think I wanted to do anything with my life except fly jets for the Navy, but now that I've been a civilian for a while, and have a lot of friends who are still active duty, I'm so very glad that I'm out.

There's a lot more to life than pensions and job security. Your kids like to see you every now and then too. And daddy being gone on a battle group for 9 months straight isn't exactly being an active dad. It sucks, but it's reality. Wars aren't solely faught by childless men, but you really need to think out the impact that being active duty in the armed forces is going to do to your family. Much easier to do when single, or at least with no kids.

One thing you learn quick about the military is that you have no personal life, and you have no freedom. This also means your wife and children will have no freedom, as they will have to move when you are told to move. Everyone in your family will take a backseat to your wishes, and your pen stroke on your commission will lock your family into military service via proxy right along with you.

Go Navy, beat Army.
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