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Old 19-11-2012, 21:34   #16
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

Welcome!

Try to keep things light. Tackle your to do list one thing at a time and it will not overwhelm you.

Most important, as others have said, don't spend all your time working on the boat - get out and sail!

Good luck.

Bill.
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Old 19-11-2012, 21:35   #17
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

To reduce maintenance and repair costs, reduce everything to its simplest form. You need a hull and deck which don't allow water in. A mast which is upright and will stay that way, a couple of sails which (if they are a bit dodgy) can have life prolonged by not sailing hard, and by having them resewn if necessary, and it is nice to have a reliable engine (nothing wrong with an outboard on a 26' er). Then, you need drinking water, a bed and not much more. Have fun!
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Old 19-11-2012, 21:55   #18
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

I dont know, the boating life isnt really a penniless drifter's thing, those end up with a shabby boat in a harbor that the local authorities want to get rid of and so make rules that negatively effect the other 99% of boaters. Sorry, just trying to be honest. Get a job, get some resources and go cruising on a budget with some ogf the great advice given above..
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Old 19-11-2012, 22:06   #19
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

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I dont know, the boating life isnt really a penniless drifter's thing, those end up with a shabby boat in a harbor that the local authorities want to get rid of and so make rules that negatively effect the other 99% of boaters. Sorry, just trying to be honest. Get a job, get some resources and go cruising on a budget with some ogf the great advice given above..
Yeah I wanted to ask if the OP is still a "hobo". This is a difficult mindset to deal with. On one hand, there is the desire of a person to be autonomous and free of the constraints and expectations of society.

Then OTOH, there is the person who leaches off the dredge-tailings off society, constantly seeking to get something for nothing but rarely or never seeking to contribute to society as a whole.

I think that this mentality fails to take into account that men cannot naturally survive on their own in any environment, that it always takes a community of people to harness the resources of any land.

I think of it as being put into a giant jail where you are expected to sleep 8 hours, work 8 hours, and spend your remaining time providing for the needs of others, then being expected to enjoy being there.
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Old 19-11-2012, 22:16   #20
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

Thanks for all the advice. Maintenance is something a couple of you have brought up, and I'm grateful. I've also had maintenance planned out as essentially what my money will go to (since I'll be anchored out, what else?). Even this time of year, I'm in a well protected bay (Richardson bay), even though it can all experience heavy weather. The heavy weather is what I'm preparing for, and I figure there's no such thing as being too prepared for heavy weather.

For those who are worried that a "penniless drifter" or a "hobo" can't make it in a world that requires struggle, consider that it's not all that different. A hobo isn't a penniless drifter, a hobo is somebody that rides the rails to get to where they need to get to make their money. Needs may be few, but they can be the difference between life and death. Maintenance can be important, and attention to detail, and you can never ever trust your method of transportation because it will kill you the instant you turn your back no matter how much you love it.

Sound familiar?

I made the money to get the boat, and I'm motivated to make her more than what I got her as because I eventually want to trade up, but I'm also still aware of her maximum value.

Not offended that people think I haven't thought of the maintenance aspect, I'm grateful for any and all advice, and every beginning sailboat owner SHOULD be aware of the maintenance aspect!
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Old 19-11-2012, 23:27   #21
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

FWIW,

Dameon, every winter some of the many poorly maintained vessels in Richardson's Bay are cast ashore in stormy weather. The big winds are often from the S'ly quarter and the protection isn't so hot then.

You might well be better off moving up into the Delta area... don't know how that fits with the rest of your life, though!

Wish you good luck with your new lifestyle, where you have swapped the RR cops for teh BCDC and the Coasties.

Cheers,

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Old 20-11-2012, 05:45   #22
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

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FWIW,

Dameon, every winter some of the many poorly maintained vessels in Richardson's Bay are cast ashore in stormy weather. The big winds are often from the S'ly quarter and the protection isn't so hot then.
I don't know OP's area, but that is something to bear in mind when anchored out - a change of wind / sea direction. Depending on location an anchorage can change from safe and secure to uncomfortable to dangerous....and you do always need to keep an eye out for the "other guy" whose anchor does not hold - and that includes having a plan to up anchor / re-anchor even when not your fault..........and you may even lose an anchor in the process.

At the risk of stating the obvious, whilst most folks with boats are very happy to share knowledge / give advice (their are always exceptions ) - not everyone with a boat knows ass from elbow .....and whilst length of ownership is a fair indicator, certainly no guarantee (when things are not going badly then any idjut can get away with a lot - or very little!).......At the risk of upsetting any liveaboards you might also want to bear in mind that where folks use their boat simply as a liveaboard (especially if on a minimal budget / as a substitute for living under a bridge? ) that they might not be quite as aufait as others.........everyone defines "Innovative solution" and "bodge" differently (usually the latter is what other folks do - yours are the former!), some things you can get away with at the dock that would not be prudent when the swim home is further away.

.....on which note, if you keep your boat looking shipshape then will find that goes a long way towards keeping your welcome ashore freindly. By shipshape I don't mean all polished and shiney - simply looking like she is used as a boat / does not look out of place amongst others by not looking like a floating skip (dumpster) . Their is an old joke that the international sign for a liveaboard is a rusty bicycle hanging from the rigging .....although a fridge or washing machine on the deck might be the more modern version......
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Old 20-11-2012, 06:16   #23
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

I'd advise you to find some way of learning about weather. Understanding the forecasts and being able to "read the skies". If you can this, you'll know when to make sure your anchor is really set (set two), and when to button up and wait for the blow.

Understanding the weather might also just get you home alive when you do go sailing
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Old 20-11-2012, 07:44   #24
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

My advice would be to get a library card and check out books by Nigel Calder.

Good luck.
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Old 20-11-2012, 07:50   #25
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

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Guess I should have specified...I'm looking for advice on what I don't know that I don't know. There's always things experience teaches that books never can.
How about the OCEAN? If you plan to travel in a sailboat you best get to learning how to deal with it, NOW,,

And danforths anchors... They don't like wind shifts...They tend to pull out and not reset with a 180 wind shift. They foul on a shell , they suck...experience, as in being put on a shore twice is what taught me this...I would never sleep hanging on a danforth, never...
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Old 20-11-2012, 07:58   #26
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

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Just like to make sure I'm not missing anything that would be obvious to somebody who knew what the hell they were doing, but the more actual sailors I talk to the more I hear "go do it!"
The "go do it" crowd might have missed your current anchoring solution. Richardson bay has semidiurnal tides, which means you'll be shifting 180 degrees every six hours or so. Using two danforth anchors in that situation is not wise, because you're going to twist them around each other slowly but surely.

Get out your binoculars and look due northwest from where you're anchored. See the riprap (large rocks) along the shoreline over by Tiburon? Every time a big winter storm blows through, up to half a dozen anchor-outs end up on those rocks.

Those winter storms are not all that far away.
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Old 20-11-2012, 08:10   #27
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

If the inboard is completely dead you might try and sell the ancils then deep six the rest (might make a good anchor). Then buy some solar to give you 12v on board for lights and stuff. Also fix the leaks soonest, that will make life on board so much more comfortable and warm if its dry.

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Old 20-11-2012, 08:20   #28
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

Wow, lots of responses, good community. Appreciate all the advice and warnings.
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The "go do it" crowd might have missed your current anchoring solution. Richardson bay has semidiurnal tides, which means you'll be shifting 180 degrees every six hours or so. Using two danforth anchors in that situation is not wise, because you're going to twist them around each other slowly but surely.

Get out your binoculars and look due northwest from where you're anchored. See the riprap (large rocks) along the shoreline over by Tiburon? Every time a big winter storm blows through, up to half a dozen anchor-outs end up on those rocks.

Those winter storms are not all that far away.
Yup! I've already been warned about those rocks several times, and I'm taking them very seriously. Also taking the winter storms very seriously; I'm not interested in being one of the boats on the rocks. Thus, this post.

You brought up the problems with my anchoring solution, what would you suggest instead? Bow and stern?

It's interesting that people don't like danforths...they're what were recommended to me by people anchoring out in the area. Difference in bottoms in the area, maybe?


And just to be clear, I'm not interested in being one of "those" liveaboards. When I'm not working to make money, I'll be out sailing. I fully intend on having my boat maintained and using it as much as I can.
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Old 20-11-2012, 08:37   #29
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

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Wow, lots of responses, good community. Appreciate all the advice and warnings.

Yup! I've already been warned about those rocks several times, and I'm taking them very seriously. Also taking the winter storms very seriously; I'm not interested in being one of the boats on the rocks. Thus, this post.

You brought up the problems with my anchoring solution, what would you suggest instead? Bow and stern?

It's interesting that people don't like danforths...they're what were recommended to me by people anchoring out in the area. Difference in bottoms in the area, maybe?


And just to be clear, I'm not interested in being one of "those" liveaboards. When I'm not working to make money, I'll be out sailing. I fully intend on having my boat maintained and using it as much as I can.

Good. We have enough of "those" liveaboards.

I don't recommend bow and stern, or any double-anchor solution. If you are committed to the danforths, you can set them in opposition, connecting them with a ring and then going from the ring to a stout mooring line or chain. This will make them difficult to retrieve without diving on them, so they'll be more of a permanent mooring solution.

One way or the other, your best bet is to build a permanent mooring. If you use a mooring block, use the danforths to keep it from dragging. Second best is to invest in an oversize anchor. Twin anchors invites them to foul each other at the worst possible time.

I've spent a lot of time anchored in Richardson Bay. It pays to remember that you're anchored more in silt than in mud. Plow-type anchors such as CQRs and Deltas tend to plow in the silt, so stay away from them.

It also pays to remember that when the storms pipe up, most of the liveaboards out there who have been offering you anchoring advice will be dragging into each other.
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Old 20-11-2012, 08:46   #30
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Re: You'll Think I'm Crazy

I'll second the suggestion that you head up the Delta & find some cheap moorage for the winter. Then you can rustle-up some work &..well, from there, nature will take it's course.

Sail as much as you can, read all you can on boat maintenance, navigation, seamanship, etc. After your 1st winter aboard, you'll know exactly what upgrades, modifications &/or repairs to prioritize.

Your past life as a "hobo" is excellent training for liveaboard life..resilience, ingenuity & a positive outlook will serve you well.

Good luck from another "crazy"...
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