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Old 12-12-2013, 11:10   #121
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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Originally Posted by Abrain View Post
We use a wood stove and so far a quarter cord of solid wood. fans keep humidity down and we are partially insulted - in fact looking at different insulation's to finish off the V birth project. The wood stove works good but temperatures are below 20F lately and so sweaters and long underwear are being employed by the crew.

We are sick of this weather so soon we are moving south :P
The type of boat people are trying to live on as well as the interior volume makes a huge difference in the effort required. A full keeled deep bilged Westsail that is mostly insulated with half the living volume below the water line is much easier to keep warm than my neighbors 76 Egg Harbor that is thinly built with massive glass area and all living area above the water line and exposed to the wind. Temps here to day are in the 20's and with the windchill factored in closer to 11. The boat is ok during the day with just the small electric oil filled radiator running. In the evening for real warmth and to remove moisture I kick off the diesel heater and I can lounge in my undergarment. As I sail in the winter there is no change to the exterior of the boat and she is ready to go when we wish. Another issue is how the boat is orientated, since the prevailing winds here in the winter are from the N-NW the boat is spidered out in a slip facing due west, really makes a difference.
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Old 12-12-2013, 12:08   #122
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

We been a live aboard for 16 years, and over the years we have added canvas for the stern deck and pilot house. The canvas is 80% clear plastic to allow day light in and we can see out. Each year cover the bow with a frame of 1” PBC that is duct tape together so it gives in the wind but strong enough for snow. The PBC frame work taken apart for easy storage along with the tarp. The cover is a blue tarp that is held down by bungee cords connected with Tarp Grabbers. http://www.tarps-tarps.com/acatalog/Tarp_grabbers.html.

Being the frame, tarp, and bungee cords flex they give in the wind, 60+ mph, but strong enough to support snow and 2 to 3 years. Next year going to make a heavier/thicker tarp, and the frame work will be steeper to shed snow better. The large salon windows are covered with 3/8” plex a glass so the heat is retained, and do not have condensation on the windows as they are sealed with weather stripping. So 75% of the boat is covered/protected.

However the best is the Webasto diesel boiler, 100,000 btu, that heats the entire boat between 60 and 70+ degrees including the engine room and most of the bilge down to out side temps of 0 F. The Webasto is run 24/7 October thru April. The Webasto is the best investment we have made in the boat and the main reason we been a live aboard for so long. My wife made thick/heavy thermal curtains for the salon window which also hold in the heat.

This year we bought an electric stove with the fake flame for ambience. Nice to snuggle up in our blankest with a e reader, with the flame flickering. Makes the boat look/feel so cozy.
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Old 12-12-2013, 15:59   #123
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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Originally Posted by Tim R. View Post
.... Ribs are 3/4" PVC conduit. ......
LOL...I did "read" it, but clearly didn't comprehend....

Ribs = bows.

Still, can you give an idea of what grade or type the 3/4 conduit is? The local sparkie wholesaler has three different grades, depending on where used and price - grey, orange and white, with a further thicker-walled orange coloured one tha tis specifically for underground use, which is what I was looking at...

But it's 25mm, not 20mm as you used, hence the question...from what you're saying the 3/4 (20mm) would be OK..??
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Old 12-12-2013, 16:26   #124
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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Originally Posted by Buzzman View Post
LOL...I did "read" it, but clearly didn't comprehend....

Ribs = bows.

Still, can you give an idea of what grade or type the 3/4 conduit is? The local sparkie wholesaler has three different grades, depending on where used and price - grey, orange and white, with a further thicker-walled orange coloured one tha tis specifically for underground use, which is what I was looking at...

But it's 25mm, not 20mm as you used, hence the question...from what you're saying the 3/4 (20mm) would be OK..??
I think it barely matters. I have seen people build frames with all different types of conduit. Many people use 1/2" galvanized conduit, the type you might see electrical wire running through in an industrial building. I used 1/2" thick pine strapping. Really cheap flimsy stuff. When you put the heat gun to plastic it pulls down on whatever frame you've built and snugs it to the boat, likewise it pulls up on the line you've run around the boat to secure the wrap with. The entire thing becomes a solid shell and the frames are sort of secondary. Just use your instinct. It is hard to screw up. Just DO NOT set your boat on fire like I seem to do once a year.
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Old 12-12-2013, 16:53   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzzman View Post
LOL...I did "read" it, but clearly didn't comprehend.... Ribs = bows. Still, can you give an idea of what grade or type the 3/4 conduit is? The local sparkie wholesaler has three different grades, depending on where used and price - grey, orange and white, with a further thicker-walled orange coloured one tha tis specifically for underground use, which is what I was looking at... But it's 25mm, not 20mm as you used, hence the question...from what you're saying the 3/4 (20mm) would be OK..??
I used the gray type that is used for electrical wiring. 20mm should work fine. This conduit is flexible unlike the sch 40 or 80 that is used for plumbing.

http://t.homedepot.com/p/JM-eagle-3-...454/100129197/
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Old 18-12-2013, 18:47   #126
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

I have a question. We are living aboard in southern Maine, (the high temp yesterday was 10F) and have ice forming on the mattress where it touches the outer part of the hull. I want to keep the ice away from me and outside as well as the moisture it brings. I shoved a couple of car windshield screens between the mattress and outer hull but the screen things get wet. We have "central heat" with a diesel heater that is in the "engine room" so the interior temp is about 65 in the hull. We also run a dehumidifier at night so we don't get dripped on! Any ideas?
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Old 18-12-2013, 18:58   #127
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

I went to Home depot a few years back and bought several 2 foot by 8 foot sheets of inch thick foam house siding and cut it to fit under the mattress. Condensation is gone. I suggest you do the same and perhaps pick up a couple of sheets of half inck as well as they will bend and conform to the hull sides.
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Old 18-12-2013, 19:11   #128
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzzman View Post
LOL...I did "read" it, but clearly didn't comprehend....

Ribs = bows.

Still, can you give an idea of what grade or type the 3/4 conduit is? The local sparkie wholesaler has three different grades, depending on where used and price - grey, orange and white, with a further thicker-walled orange coloured one tha tis specifically for underground use, which is what I was looking at...

But it's 25mm, not 20mm as you used, hence the question...from what you're saying the 3/4 (20mm) would be OK..??
I'm not living aboard but wanted to be able to work on the boat during breaks in the weather in Wisc.
I built one very similar for my 42 foot trawler. I used 3/4" schedule 40 pvc pipe. I copied my design from another guy in the yard. He has used the same "heavy duty" silver tarp from Farm and Fleet for 2+ years. He said the light duty stuff barely made it one year. I put the the bows about 3-4 feet apart depending on stress expected in the area. One thing the experienced guy said was that it is important to tie the bows together front to back every couple of feet. I used the cheap $50 for it think it was 1000 yards banding tape. I'm not close enough for pictures now but will let you know in the spring how it stood up.
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Old 18-12-2013, 19:45   #129
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seastream View Post
I have a question. We are living aboard in southern Maine, (the high temp yesterday was 10F) and have ice forming on the mattress where it touches the outer part of the hull. I want to keep the ice away from me and outside as well as the moisture it brings. I shoved a couple of car windshield screens between the mattress and outer hull but the screen things get wet. We have "central heat" with a diesel heater that is in the "engine room" so the interior temp is about 65 in the hull. We also run a dehumidifier at night so we don't get dripped on! Any ideas?
We also are in Southern Maine living aboard. We run our dehumidifier during the Day and have a hydronic diesel furnace that does not introduce more moisture into the air. To fight the frosty wet side of the hull next to the mattress, my wife lays a fleece blanket against the hull at night. We hang the blanket to dry over the cabin door every day. We also have a membrane under the mattress to allow air to circulate.
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Old 18-12-2013, 21:21   #130
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Jody found some heavy-duty material at the fabric store made for old drafty windows that works great for insulating the boat. It has a mylar core that really insulates. Here is a pic of our cover for the companionway. It really kills drafts and cuts down on the hydronic/electric heaters' run time.

I'm thinking of adding this between my headliner/ deck (hidden from view), and maybe along the exterior wall near our bed (visible).


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Old 19-12-2013, 08:00   #131
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If you want to save some money then instead of shrink wrap, go buy a roll of vapor barrier. Cost us $100 and we did the whole boat. No leaks, let's the heat in and has held up to 50kmph winds. Next year we'll make it look better but it works well.
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Old 19-12-2013, 08:40   #132
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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Originally Posted by The Other Gary View Post
I went to Home depot a few years back and bought several 2 foot by 8 foot sheets of inch thick foam house siding and cut it to fit under the mattress. Condensation is gone. I suggest you do the same and perhaps pick up a couple of sheets of half inck as well as they will bend and conform to the hull sides.
that is a brilliant thought and I have a sheet of it left over from helping on another project. I will be doing this once my boat gets wet again I think.
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Old 19-12-2013, 08:51   #133
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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Originally Posted by Seastream View Post
I have a question. We are living aboard in southern Maine, (the high temp yesterday was 10F) and have ice forming on the mattress where it touches the outer part of the hull. I want to keep the ice away from me and outside as well as the moisture it brings. I shoved a couple of car windshield screens between the mattress and outer hull but the screen things get wet. We have "central heat" with a diesel heater that is in the "engine room" so the interior temp is about 65 in the hull. We also run a dehumidifier at night so we don't get dripped on! Any ideas?
we have had a simillar problem here in the uk not ice forming but condensation,what we do now is use a dry mat under the mattress but every day lift the mattress up on the damp corner just to let it dry during the day I think this is a real problem where the temp fluctuates several times a day,I have also drilled holes where I can to help circulate the air around the bedding.we also try to keep some hatches slightly open during the night.I allways make the wife sleep on the damp side!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 19-12-2013, 09:14   #134
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

I can get into a whole big discussion on how and why condensation happens but as a mechanical engineer designing HVAC systems the only way to get rid of unwanted condensation is airflow/ventilation. The amount of water vapour that can be stored in air can be increased simply by increasing the temperature. I know this isn't what a winter liveaboard wants to hear but in order to reduce the amount of condensation you will need to either ventilate more or increase the temperature or both.
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Old 19-12-2013, 10:01   #135
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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I can get into a whole big discussion on how and why condensation happens but as a mechanical engineer designing HVAC systems the only way to get rid of unwanted condensation is airflow/ventilation. The amount of water vapour that can be stored in air can be increased simply by increasing the temperature. I know this isn't what a winter liveaboard wants to hear but in order to reduce the amount of condensation you will need to either ventilate more or increase the temperature or both.
Good info but you can create artificial ventilation by using a dehumidifier. No need to open the hatches on those cold winter nights.
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