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Old 23-12-2012, 10:11   #61
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

sailing south worked for me.....ought to try it. is a decent fix for bad weather. no more 38 degree F winter storms making so much wet that it is intolerable, no more need for heaters or boots for landing dink, etc....bathing suit weather all year round. perfect.
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Old 23-12-2012, 10:20   #62
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

One great trick that worked while we lived aboard in Portland Oregon was to use the shrink wrap window film (purchased at any hardware store), this kept the condensation on windows, portholes, and hatches from "raining" inside the boat, then in the spring time we removed the wrap...easy and worked fantastic! You will want to keep some fresh air ventilation and not completly "seal" the boat up...but this really does work wonders.
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Old 23-12-2012, 11:24   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag
sailing south worked for me.....ought to try it. is a decent fix for bad weather. no more 38 degree F winter storms making so much wet that it is intolerable, no more need for heaters or boots for landing dink, etc....bathing suit weather all year round. perfect.
Best tip I've heard yet, hope to try someday soon.
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Old 23-12-2012, 11:41   #64
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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Originally Posted by svWindfall View Post
One great trick that worked while we lived aboard in Portland Oregon was to use the shrink wrap window film (purchased at any hardware store), this kept the condensation on windows, portholes, and hatches from "raining" inside the boat, then in the spring time we removed the wrap...easy and worked fantastic! You will want to keep some fresh air ventilation and not completly "seal" the boat up...but this really does work wonders.
Actually, most windows made to take bug screens can take storm windows. Often it is a simple matter of cutting 1/8" acrylic to size. Yes, it really helps. In the off season I wrap them all in a single sheet (place one, flop over, place the next, flop, etc.) to prevent scratches and to store compactly.
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Old 23-12-2012, 12:35   #65
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

I am a new livaboard, only 2.5 months now, living in a marina on the Hudson River in my good little ship "Moonda Dance" a somewhat insulated 1976 Westsail 32. The OP has asked for livaboard tips and it appears to become a thread just about heat, so I will give my 2 cents worth on this and that a little on something else. NY on the river can get very cold indeed, however by our standards it has been relatively warm, days in the 40's to 50's with evenings in the mid 30's to 20's. It has been my experience that that the water definately insulates the boat. I have two sources of heat, a diesel bulkhead mounted pot burner as well as a small electric 1400 watt oil filled radiator. To date I have not winterized the motor as during the coldest days the engine space stays in the 40's, I start the motor every weekend to keep oil in the top end. When I go to work depending on what the forcasted temperatures are I leave the electric on a very low setting, this has typically been more that enough to keep the chill off the boat for when I return at night. When it gets very cold and the wind picks up like the last two days I will fire up the Dickinson and run a 12 volt cabin fan to circulate the warm air, this makes a huge diference. My dorades are open and I face the cowl into the wind to keep an ample supply of fresh air into the boat and I am always warm and comfortable and never a bit of condensate. It was my theory to have way more BTU capability, overkill when I sized the diesel heater, with the thought being on even the coldest days, I could have ample supply of fresh air coming into the boat and still be warm and not worry if every square inch of the vessel was insulated, or all the other things that some do to try and keep the heat in the boat. "Moon Dance" looks just the same on the outside as she does in the summer and is ready to sail, I am planning on sailing her on New Years day..

One of the things I didn't see mentioned is the issue of potable water on the boat in the northern lattitides. Most marinas shut down the water supply to the docks and livaboards have to carry their water in jugs periodicly to the boat. My solution to this issue has to become extremely frugal with my water usage, measuring my consumption at about a half a gallon a day. So my big tip regarding water has been to use the same fork, spoon and knife over and over again. They reside in my coffe cup in the sink and get a perfunctory rinse off with some fresh water and a wipe down with exactly one sheet of paper towel. The eurika momment was when I decided to start using paper plates and bowls, this has vurtually eliminated any washing and the little gallon jug with its built in spigot that nestles on the side of the sink usually lasts a whole week before I have to refill.

Peace to all my brothers and sisters from CF during the holidays, my wish is that everyone reflects on the things that really matter in life like love, kindness, family, friends and good health!
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Old 23-12-2012, 13:50   #66
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

Incentive for Zeehag's idea (next winter for me)
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Old 23-12-2012, 13:59   #67
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

I have a diesel furnace on board that I really only used underway on cold days in spring and in the fall in New York. I don't recall using it much at the dock. It puts out a nice dry heat that was great for drying gear and socks too.

At the dock I pretty much used a small 1400? watt electric cube heater that I would move around the cabin as needed. I put it on the sole directed at my feet when spending time at the table. I'd also place it on the companion way steps blowing into the main cabin which also warmed things up nicely.

For sleeping nothing beats getting under the cover of a nice goose down quilt heater or no heater.
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Old 23-12-2012, 14:39   #68
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

At the dock I have a ceramic heater 1000/1500w w/thermastat unlike most ceramic heaters the fan really kicks. I also have a Dickenson Solid fuel (wood)heater, which I "manufactured" firewoodburn, teak and other exotic hardwood scraps.
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Old 23-12-2012, 14:41   #69
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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At the dock I have a ceramic heater 1000/1500w w/thermastat unlike most ceramic heaters the fan really kicks. I also have a Dickenson Solid fuel (wood)heater, which I "manufactured" firewoodburn, teak and other exotic hardwood scraps.
Yeah the ceramic heater is the type I used too!
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Old 23-12-2012, 14:52   #70
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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For sleeping nothing beats getting under the cover of a nice goose down quilt heater or no heater.
Actually crawling under that goose down quilt on top of an electric mattress pad does beat having no mattress pad. Turn the mattress heater up high about 1/2 an hour before bedtime and then down to lo for the night. It doesn't get much better than that - in fact it can feel so good that its hard to get up in the morning.
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Old 23-12-2012, 15:12   #71
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

When I told someone how nice it felt to crawl in between nice crisp sheets. I was told "You live on a sailboat, you are supposed to sleep in a sleeping bag."
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Old 23-12-2012, 16:05   #72
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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When I told someone how nice it felt to crawl in between nice crisp sheets. I was told "You live on a sailboat, you are supposed to sleep in a sleeping bag."
Got to agree sliding into nice clean crisp sheets is one of the simple pleasures of being on board.
I've got a sleeping bag on board too. Use it for crew and as a backup for other sleeping locations on board. My boat came with a custom made spring mattress in the forward cabin and I'm not about to change that any time soon and crawl into the sleeping bag every night. No sir!
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Old 23-12-2012, 16:10   #73
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

We're on the "Zeehag Plan"! ...on the other side of the continent, but warm for the winter in Florida.
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Old 23-12-2012, 17:00   #74
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When I told someone how nice it felt to crawl in between nice crisp sheets. I was told "You live on a sailboat, you are supposed to sleep in a sleeping bag."
Crisp sheets? Nah! We sleep in flannel sheets this time of year. Wonderblond seems to be able to warm them up more quickly.
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Old 23-12-2012, 19:14   #75
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Re: Winter Liveaboard Tips and Tricks

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Crisp sheets? Nah! We sleep in flannel sheets this time of year. Wonderblond seems to be able to warm them up more quickly.
This time a year I sleep in a flannel sleeping bag liner...can't stand the feeling of cold nylon, almost as bad as sweaty nylon.
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