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Old 07-01-2010, 06:27   #16
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sailing = sailing
cruising = sailing/living aboard
living aboard = living aboard

sort of
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Old 07-01-2010, 07:41   #17
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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
sailing = sailing
cruising = sailing/living aboard
living aboard = living aboard

sort of
Nah, it's all a state of mind. There are plenty of liveaboards who get barnacled to the dock - probably most. But there is a significant minority, perhaps 30-40 percent (and I'd like to include myself here) that don't let that happen.
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Old 07-01-2010, 08:20   #18
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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
sailing = sailing
cruising = sailing/living aboard
living aboard = living aboard

sort of
Maybe these equivalents apply for liveaboards that move to a boat from a house and are unable or unwilling to adapt. Most of us had a time in our lives when all our possessions would fit with us in a small car. My wife and I moved aboard at this stage in our lives and this allows us to remain with this status and plenty of clear and unused space within our boat. I would add to the list...

living aboard without "stuff" = sailing and cruising

'take care and joy, aythya crew
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Old 07-01-2010, 09:07   #19
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We certainly agree with the 30 minute rule. Nothing that's not fastened down, latched, tied or otherwise unbreakable goes away. I have to admit though that (because its my job) I'm a little slack at doing somethings daily, however, we try to remain in "cruising" mode. We have an older ketch with lots of rigging (running and standing) with traditional sails, but we can be up and running as fast as our neighbour with his new 42 Benneteau and its self-furling/cockpit automatic electric everything. Living in Southern California has its benefits especially for day sailing and we take every advantage we can to get out of the slip.
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Old 07-01-2010, 09:09   #20
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Maybe these equivalents apply for liveaboards that move to a boat from a house and are unable or unwilling to adapt. Most of us had a time in our lives when all our possessions would fit with us in a small car. My wife and I moved aboard at this stage in our lives and this allows us to remain with this status and plenty of clear and unused space within our boat. I would add to the list...

living aboard without "stuff" = sailing and cruising

'take care and joy, aythya crew
Ain't that the truth
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Old 15-01-2010, 15:01   #21
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We were warned about this before we moved aboard. We make a concious effort not to let stuff pile up and we go out as much as possible. Most things are always stored in thier place and the rest has a bungie cord nearby to strap in. Our prep time is about 10 - 15 minutes.
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Old 15-01-2010, 17:10   #22
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When I lived on Frolic in the S.F Bay area. I was single, and my posessions were that of a minimulist. Everything had a place, and everything was stored. Occassionally there were dishes, but they could be stowed in the sink.

I would come home from work, start the motor, and by the time it was warm I could sail. The bay area is a feast for your eyes to sail. The S.F skyline, Angel & Alcatraz Islands, the wooded hills with homes peeking out here, and there, micro weathers from warm sunshine to cold blowing like stink fog. All with a very small radius.

Living over 40 miles from the ocean in N.E. Florida. The St. Johns River does not inspire me to sail often. For a sail on the river. It takes Melanie & I about the same amount of time to warm the motors, and get Imagine ready. To leave for the ocean, and sail for the Bahamas it might take a wee bit longer, but not much. We still have no clutter, but we do need to strap down the tv.........i2f
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Old 15-01-2010, 19:08   #23
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I moved ashore quasi-permanently/temporarily last year. We rented a house 10 minutes walk from the boat that gets us a washer/dryer, parking spot for the car, a place for our 'stuff', (thanks George), and primarily a fireplace in the winter with a couple nice stuffed chairs in front of it!

We had/have extremely mixed emotion about it. Convenient, yes but come April we'll be back aboard for 6 months. The worst thing about not living aboard is that we sail less now. We're more involved in the community so one or the other of us are off to a meeting or whatever and, for me, going for a simple sail during a meal hour now means that I have to a) go hungry b)buy snacks or lunches c) actually commit to planning ahead and packing a meal. Having an empty fridge or freezer prevents taking off overnight on a whim. When we lived aboard, food was never an issue, we could just go when we wanted to with no special planning other than disconnecting the shorepower cord and letting go the lines. Now we have to check the calendar, pack a lunch, go 'only so far' so that we can be back for drill (local volunteer Fire Dept), quilting guild, hair app't, coffee with a friend, etc etc.

Ah, woe is me!
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Old 16-01-2010, 04:21   #24
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does it become to much work and hastle to "play..."
It has been years since I lived aboard regularly, but I recall I day-sailed probably at least as much as most non-liveaboards other than a few diehards – but I recall being increasingly frustrated over several years because I sailed much less than I thought I should be… The problem (or so I told myself) was that city-center marinas aren’t often in better sailing areas (Baltimore being a tolerable exception), but that was a fact of life for maintaining a 9-5. I did find that I kept up with maintenance far better when living aboard, but I guess that’s answering a different question, eh…
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Old 16-01-2010, 07:03   #25
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My wife and I were avid daysailors and weekenders in the 7 years we sailed before moving aboard this past October. Our thought was why own a boat if you're not going to use it every chance you get? When we moved aboard everything was stowed with the thought of being secure while underway, and we keep it that way on a daily basis. If something was not able to be stowed we either sold it, gave it away, or put it in a mini storage. There is nothing on board that can't be secured in the time it takes to warm up the engine and take in shore power. So yes we still enjoy our daysailing whenever we can. One advantage we now enjoy is that we don't have to worry about getting back in time on Sunday's to secure the boat for the week. Once we get to the dock we are already home.

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Old 16-01-2010, 07:27   #26
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Originally Posted by b-rad View Post
Do you ever take the boat out for day sails? or does it become to much work and hastle to "play" with you home?
The folks I know who have successfully cracked this nut do it by making plans. Some are fairly active in regattas and sail their own boat once a week, others invite folks over for Saturday morning sails, so Friday nights are used to clean house.
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Old 19-01-2010, 18:29   #27
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We are in the process of buying a 41' Choate for a liveaboard in San Diego, downsizing from a 2b/2b condo. Am in the process of purging excess stuff, and looking forward to the challenge of simplicity!
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Old 25-01-2010, 15:55   #28
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As liveaboards,we live aboard. We use our boat as a waterfront home in downtown Toronto. We love to travel and have taken our home to the Bahamas twice, for one year adventures. Yes it takes time to move your home, everything must be stowed. But when we do travel our home goes with us.....as does my bed, my toys, my coffee maker, kids toys....etc. We do not day sail much, but we sail a Byte and wakeboard behind our dinghy close to the marina. Make your boat your home and its a blast.

Scott
Do you stay somewhere else in the winter? We live in Toronto. It is bloody cold here and we dry dock in the winter
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Old 25-01-2010, 16:26   #29
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We live on the hook. We at least make a weekly trip to pumpout station. We move around a bit and get our sailing more in week long stretches once a month or so.
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Old 26-01-2010, 11:31   #30
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When I lived aboard one summer maybe one out of ten liveaboards took their boats out once a month. Either they were too settled in, with the plants and stuff, or they didn't want to risk losing their only place of residence. One girl, living on a 22 foot racing boat, went out nearly everyday.
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