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Old 21-01-2011, 06:25   #16
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right now I can only visualise...but Iv never don it, so help me get the picture

so I come back from work at 4pm....................
When I look back at the original post and the question of how to deal with heat, I note that you are speaking of living aboard with daily work and not languishing in the island breezes. Boatman61's advice excels for me when cruising, but for the times that I was daily at work in Florida and at the dock; I only did well with an air conditioning system aboard. I never had problems with cold at our latitude, but the AC was essential up the river or canal and without the open breeze and home after work.
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Old 26-01-2011, 11:14   #17
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You lot are making me really jealous. I'm stuck in the UK for the moment, where my problems of living aboard are at the opposite end of the scale.

If I run my heaters with the hatches open, it is freezing cold drafts. If I close the hatches I get condensation. So I heat all the time with hatches closed, and run dehumidifiers 24-7.

OK, it does get better in the summer. But right now that seems so far away.
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Old 26-01-2011, 12:02   #18
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I think it is a good question Jobi and I don’t believe in sugar coating the reality.

Basically, living on a yacht is like camping!

Regardless of the size and type of yacht you may own… that boat investment would have provided you a much nicer home on land, with at least 6 times the living/cooking/laundry/work spaces and amenities at a 1/3rd of the maintenance cost.

I have lived on yachts most of my life and consider myself a happy camper
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Old 26-01-2011, 20:15   #19
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Originally Posted by Pelagic View Post
I think it is a good question Jobi and I don’t believe in sugar coating the reality.

Basically, living on a yacht is like camping!

Regardless of the size and type of yacht you may own… that boat investment would have provided you a much nicer home on land, with at least 6 times the living/cooking/laundry/work spaces and amenities at a 1/3rd of the maintenance cost.

I have lived on yachts most of my life and consider myself a happy camper
With those costs it is mad to run a yacht and a house. I have always preffered the great outdoors and camping, so you can guess what option I have choosen. Nothing like that free seabreeze to keep cooling costs too nil.
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Old 26-01-2011, 20:32   #20
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i find tarping the boat -- whether that is with canvas/sunbrella or the tacky nasty plastic ones, my boat stays drier and cooler in summer and drier in winter.....and when it rains i can leave ALL my hatches and ports open and still enjoy dryness and comfort.
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Old 26-01-2011, 20:41   #21
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great thing about a yacht if you don't like your neighbours you can just move...............
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Old 26-01-2011, 22:55   #22
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Originally Posted by Pelagic View Post
I think it is a good question Jobi and I don’t believe in sugar coating the reality.

Basically, living on a yacht is like camping!

Regardless of the size and type of yacht you may own… that boat investment would have provided you a much nicer home on land, with at least 6 times the living/cooking/laundry/work spaces and amenities at a 1/3rd of the maintenance cost.

I have lived on yachts most of my life and consider myself a happy camper
iv owned 5 houses alredy...dont think I will ever miss doing the lawn, garden, maintenance and winter shoveling the driveway, cars speeding by, noise polution, light polution and all the rest...but being stuck in one place whatching time passing by and peoples getting old (most living a miserable life) I know that I am at present miserable, but I am making the changes, now if this endless winter can go away

honestly I can wait to get on my boat and leave...somehow I have a feeling I wont go back to land...not in this life
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Old 27-01-2011, 02:09   #23
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Originally Posted by Pelagic View Post
I think it is a good question Jobi and I don’t believe in sugar coating the reality.

Basically, living on a yacht is like camping!

Regardless of the size and type of yacht you may own… that boat investment would have provided you a much nicer home on land, with at least 6 times the living/cooking/laundry/work spaces and amenities at a 1/3rd of the maintenance cost.

I have lived on yachts most of my life and consider myself a happy camper
I think that depends where in the World you are. An average three-bed house here will cost you £200,000 ($328,000?). You can get a pretty nice boat for that. Perhaps not as nice as your's Pelagic, but something well able to be lived on.

I allow about £5,000 a year for maintenance, which is a tad less than the house was. But that was mostly becuase my kids kept breaking things. When you add berth costs and all the sundries, I am spending about the same on the boat as the house was.

Living on board a bit like camping? Yes, you are right there. Especially in the way you have to think about things. You cant just buy a new kettle or the like, you have to think about wattage and such stuff, the Footprint of everything and so on.
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Old 27-01-2011, 02:27   #24
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i find tarping the boat -- whether that is with canvas/sunbrella or the tacky nasty plastic ones, my boat stays drier and cooler in summer and drier in winter.....and when it rains i can leave ALL my hatches and ports open and still enjoy dryness and comfort.
I have a bit of a wind problem. With covers. I've tried one over the boom, but when the wind gets up it becomes a problem.
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Old 27-01-2011, 02:38   #25
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Moonlightshadow…

The price you gave for a 3 bedroom…. What would be the sq ft ?

If I take my 3 bedroom Stargazer’s total usable living area it is only about 55’ x 12’or 660sq ft.

If you were to pro-rate the maintenance per sq ft and compare to the house, I am sure the boat comes out much more expensive.

Having said that, I love the water, so I have little choice. I either live upon it on a boat, or beachfront where the ocean’s sound and dynamics dominate my view.

If I ever moved inland it would have to be by a riverside or a lake well away from any development. I love fly fishing!
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Old 27-01-2011, 02:46   #26
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You lot are making me really jealous. I'm stuck in the UK for the moment, where my problems of living aboard are at the opposite end of the scale.

If I run my heaters with the hatches open, it is freezing cold drafts. If I close the hatches I get condensation. So I heat all the time with hatches closed, and run dehumidifiers 24-7.

OK, it does get better in the summer. But right now that seems so far away.
Having lived on a wooden trawler in the Solent, I can sympathise with the damp problems. Best thing we did was fit a wood burning stove, as it draws out the damp air and heats the boat, very quickly. For a smaller boat I would recommend one of the diesel heaters SigMarine etc we had one before the wood burner but it wasn't quite big enough for a 62' trawler.

Back to the O.P. Despite having a trawler with plenty of room, we spent most of the time out on deck regardless of the weather (except heavy rain), which may explain why you see so many people out on deck. It's just nice to be able to watch the world go by.
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Old 27-01-2011, 02:46   #27
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Moonlightshadow…

The price you gave for a 3 bedroom…. What would be the sq ft ?

If I take my 3 bedroom Stargazer’s total usable living area it is only about 55’ x 12’or 660sq ft.

If you were to pro-rate the maintenance per sq ft and compare to the house, I am sure the boat comes out much more expensive.

Having said that, I love the water, so I have little choice. I either live upon it on a boat, or beachfront where the ocean’s sound and dynamics dominate my view.

If I ever moved inland it would have to be by a riverside or a lake well away from any development. I love fly fishing!
Oh yeah. Absolutely. On the basis of space you are totally right. My house was about 1,000 sq ft (houses tend to be smaller in the UK than USA), compared to about 250 sq ft I have now. By that comparison, living on the boat is more expensive as you say. But...

Look at my salt water aquarium !!!
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Old 27-01-2011, 02:51   #28
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Having lived on a wooden trawler in the Solent, I can sympathise with the damp problems. Best thing we did was fit a wood burning stove, as it draws out the damp air and heats the boat, very quickly. For a smaller boat I would recommend one of the diesel heaters SigMarine etc we had one before the wood burner but it wasn't quite big enough for a 62' trawler.
Hi Artif,

I have just fitted a deisel heater. The problem is in the back of lockers which are against the hull sides. They are lined with vinyl with foam back, but after a while everything at the back of the locker gets damp as the warm air inside touches the liner. I am thinking of perhaps having a liner which leaves an air gap between the existing sides, maybe.
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Old 27-01-2011, 03:07   #29
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Hi Artif,

I have just fitted a deisel heater. The problem is in the back of lockers which are against the hull sides. They are lined with vinyl with foam back, but after a while everything at the back of the locker gets damp as the warm air inside touches the liner. I am thinking of perhaps having a liner which leaves an air gap between the existing sides, maybe.
TBH our lockers had an air gap but we still had the same problem with damp. Ventilation is key, as with any boat. I think insulation is the only real solution, spray foam (not recommended for wood) for lockers etc but could mean a lot of work.
We put our clothes etc in plastic suit covers in the hanging lockers and plastic boxes in the cupboards, helped by the fact I built all the lockers to suit.
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Old 27-01-2011, 07:11   #30
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That's an idea. Do the plastic suit covers work? And plastic boxes, yes, that sounds cool. I shall experiment with the foam as well.

Someone suggested carpeting the inside of the lockers, but I am trying to think how that would work. Surely the carpet would just get damp instead.

Cheers Artif.
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