Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 31-08-2010, 17:49   #31
Registered User
 
got seashells?'s Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Florida
Boat: Rinker Express Cruiser
Posts: 113
Is there a "break in" period like on a Harley (keep RPMs low change fluids at predetermined times? Is that what you are referring to?
__________________

__________________
got seashells? is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 18:32   #32
Registered User
 
janice142's Avatar

Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast of Florida
Boat: Schucker mini-trawler
Posts: 331
Send a message via AIM to janice142 Send a message via MSN to janice142 Send a message via Yahoo to janice142 Send a message via Skype™ to janice142
Planning shopping expeditions... when there's a car/transportation available, then I stock up on heavy items. Re-provisioning is a gradual process, and finding storage containers that work/fit and make use of space available is something that becomes second nature.

It's frustrating when I can't find something that we know is aboard the boat.
__________________

__________________
janice142 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 20:08   #33
Registered User
 
sabray's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Wash DC
Boat: PETERSON 44
Posts: 3,169
Showing up late for work still wearing a life jacket. No that's fun. uhhh laundry until I realized I didn't need so many clothes. Dish washing yes dishwashing is a head ache. Cutting grass is a head ache . Im cutting grass and loading a dishwasher. The luxury tax decal thing in the US was a head ache but we don't do that anymore. The head was until I found sealand. Insurance taxes why am I living in a house?
__________________
sabray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-08-2010, 21:12   #34
Registered User
 
Capt Phil's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Stateline NV
Boat: Prior boats: Transpac 49; DeFever 54
Posts: 2,749
I grew up living aboard and started commercial fishing and towboating before I was 15 so my response is more hearsay from other liveaboards. The biggest adjustment to living aboard in a marina or on the hook I have heard is the lack of schedules to meet. Those who are new to the marine environment seem driven to get somewhere or repair something according to a deadline which is many times unrealistic. Even on deliveries, I always cautioned the owner that the sea will determine the schedule but I would do what I could to get the vessel from A to B safely within a negotiated time window. My advice is to start working on goal setting more loosely while you are shoreside, tackle tough jobs first and take a relaaaaaxed approach to everything that isn't life threatening. Remember the time to board a liferaft is when you need to step UP into it. Cheers, Capt Phil
__________________
Capt Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2010, 06:11   #35
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingaway221 View Post
I have a 28 foot wide cat.... so far no problem anywhere in the Caribbean finding a marina and although the marinas charge a little more for a cat its generally 2 or 3 dollars a foot, certainly not twice. The general trend in the islands is more and more towards cats, so most of the marinas are catering to them. Also ..... the only time I am in a marina is if I have to leave my boat for work or to travel ... so it really has not been a headache at all in this part of the world.
That may be the case in the Caribbean, but certainly not the case on U.S. East coast marinas.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2010, 09:24   #36
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: CLOD in OH
Posts: 257
I like to compare cruising to the "old wilderness movies of the 70's". Mom and Pop bundle up the kids and head off into the bush and become self sufficient. Self sufficiency being the operative word. Knowing your boat inside and out is imperative if you are going to have peace of mind. This includes understanding the mechanicals, and being able to preform hourly and prevenative maintance. I know a Doctor who when he retired and moved aboard became obsessed with doing "all" of the mechanical work. Much better than depending on a sub-contractor. On the bread , have the ingredients, on-board. Not all islands have a convenient "bread lady". The Admiral provisions for 8 months at a crack, and we try to pick up fresh produce locally, sometimes we have gone for 5 weeks between opportunities. Again self sufficiency is the key. Enjoy the new lifestyle and embrace the "boat boot camp" both the mental and physical.
__________________
Paydirt
Mark Zarley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2010, 07:36   #37
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minggat View Post
Welcome Welcome. Do you livaboard plans include any cruising? Are you planning on living aboard on a mooring?

* marinas * storage * sometimes your neighbors are too available *

While you're asking about the headachs, don't forget to ask about the good things.
All true, plus powerboaters that can't read (the 6kt. buoy).
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2010, 11:48   #38
Registered User
 
First Mate's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Boat: Far From Turtle: 1980 Pearson 424 cutter rigged ketch
Posts: 326
to me, the most annoying thing is the stinking (literally) head. I'm hoping that can be fixed somehow.

I suggest you read up on that issue so you can get it under control ASAP when you take possession of your boat when that lovely day arrives for you.

It doesn't seem to matter whether it is a cheap boat or an expensive boat. The head still smells like a construction site porta potty/honey bucket camp. The more fittings and joints in the septic system, the worse it smells.

In trying to end this olfactory assualt, we spray the head bowl with fresh water, empty the tank religiously, it's a new head.....still S.T.I.N.K.S.!! I'm hoping the new fangled composting toilets will end this misery for us. But I see from a thread that the smell is only better, not gone

There are probably all kinds of tricks for this one issue. But knowing the drill before you move on-board and have to smell it day in and day out would be really nice. If we weren't at dock, I'm sure movement through the air while sailing would get rid of most of it.
__________________
First Mate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2010, 12:04   #39
Senior Cruiser
 
Minggat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hawaii, South Pacific bound
Boat: Islander 36
Posts: 1,220
Quote:
Originally Posted by First Mate View Post
to me, the most annoying thing is the stinking (literally) head. I'm hoping that can be fixed somehow.

It doesn't seem to matter whether it is a cheap boat or an expensive boat. The head still smells like a construction site porta potty/honey bucket camp.

In trying to end this olfactory assualt, we spray the head bowl with fresh water, empty the tank religiously, it's a new head.....still S.T.I.N.K.S.!! I'm hoping the new fangled composting toilets will end this misery for us. But I see from a thread that the smell is only better, not gone
I would say, minimal AND better smelling. That's miles ahead of "honey bucket". But I agree. The first week I owned Minggat, the toilet and holding tank system got ripped out. My next slip neighbors (powerboat) had a beautiful interior and a smell that would knock you over. What a shame.
__________________
Minggat
Minggat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2010, 12:10   #40
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minggat View Post
Thread drift alert.

That seems excessive. Not disagreeing, Just never heard it before. Is that more particularly aimed at old tanks?

But yes, that would be a headach (thread anchor)
I got that from Nigel Calder, and I pretty much believe anything he says about the care and feeding of a diesel engine. He's talking about a constantly in service, ocean going vessel. For that reason, and how easy it would be to clean in a year, I can see where he's coming from.

The nasty job (like everything else) is if you let it go too long (like I and probably everyone else does). His further argument is that the only things the engine needs is clean fuel and lots of air, so taking a few hours every year to ensure that *the* source of fuel contamination is kept clear is a small investment in time.

If I remember correctly, he views the changing of any fuel filters more than once every several hundred hours to be a sign that something is very wrong. In his world they're replaced proactively and never because there is any kind of fouling or goo in the filter bowls.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2010, 12:59   #41
Registered User
 
josie30's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Maryland
Boat: Tayana 37'
Posts: 5
Plastic Containers

We have been aboard for a long time and have tried various containers. About 2 years ago we discovered Lock & Locks. They are plastic containers that come in every size imaginable. They lock down on all 4 sides, are supposedly air tight and water tight and have a removable gasket you can clean. I had one in a cooler once that let in a little water, but I had grapes in the container so no harm.

I use them in the icebox to store leftovers, rices, cheeses, nuts and other items.

We have almost everything else aboard in these containers: spare parts, food, baking needs like flower and baking soda, first aid kits, shampoos and soaps, you name it we have it in a lock and lock. What I love most about these is that they FIRMLY lock down and nothing is going to get out of them. You could do a 360 and at least the stuff in Lock and Locks would still be there.

I first found them at K-Mart but the store discontinued them. I now buy them at Heritage Mint on-line.

Heritage Mint

I have given them as gifts to other boaters and they love them.
__________________

__________________
josie30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
living aboard

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Living Aboard in New York ViribusUnitis Liveaboard's Forum 10 04-07-2009 20:44
Living Aboard Troubledour Liveaboard's Forum 8 07-08-2007 09:26
Living Aboard in the EU ssullivan Liveaboard's Forum 21 27-12-2006 15:29
living aboard des4d Meets & Greets 6 11-10-2006 05:26



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:12.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.