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Old 26-05-2010, 22:19   #16
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Don't save packaging, at all.
Yes, however each case is individual. When provisioning for a long cruise Nicolle had read too much on the internet about cockroach eggs in cardboard and wanted to remove all the packaging......

.... *thinking*........ 1 years supply of canned food.....

....rolling around the boat.

For bulk purchases in the original carboard cartons (or plastic) its much easier to stow the boxes than the 300 individual cans/toilet paper rolls etc.

So for each trueism make sure it will work for your situation


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Old 26-05-2010, 23:21   #17
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Thought not all storage relevant, there are some good tips here:

Small Boat Projects - Making Life Aboard Easier
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Old 27-05-2010, 09:09   #18
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Wow,so much good stuff here . Agreed ,a very reduced space but we will have a house . It is just that everything is in flux at the moment ,we are both selling our houses and the boats seems to be the thing that is coming along first . So ya gotta roll with it. Thanks everybody .Great tips .
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Old 27-05-2010, 09:29   #19
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It's a bit like solving a puzzle.

I made a diagram of all the storage spaces, noting their location and dimensions. I'm anal about taking aboard only what I'm going to use and if I don't it gets sold or given away. There never seems to be enough space for stuff!

I then tried to figure out: (1) the item's I'd use most often, (2) the items I'd use rarely; (3) the items that were heavy and therefore required some thought about storage; and (4) the items that required special storage (height, weight, caustic,...). The most used items get stored into drawers, with other items further outboard or lower. I also make sure the drawers have latches so they don't go flying underway.

I take off all the paper including labels. I used a permanent marker to write the contents on the top and bottom of the cans. Paper onboard is a breeding ground for roaches and bugs so as little paper and no cardboard onboard ever.

I try to maximize the storage space. If 3 tall layers are too high, then how about 2 tall and 1 medium height layers? I try to pad the layers and sides as well to prevent "clunking" or damage. I make notes in the layout and database.

I try to stack same shaped items together (round cornered bottles, round bottles, canned ham,...). I use old socks to protect the glass from breakage and movement. I have no problem squashing toilet paper rolls. I use reusable wipes instead of paper towels if I can. Sometimes pouring contents of a bottle into another style of container can make storage more efficient (and remove that thin walled container from the boat).

I vacuum bag as much as I can. 5# bags of rice, beans, flour, etc get repackaged into 1# bags for easier stowage and less chance of going bad. I remove the cardboard from the pasta boxes, label the packages with a permanent marker and repackage as well.

I'm not a fan of nets, hammocks, or hooks. I've seen the results of a hammock full of fruit gone postal.

Some items require air circulation so I give that special treatment. Some items don't co-habitate well (onions and potatoes for example). Some items require attention (turning eggs).

I stored the heavy items as low, aft (chain rode made that a requirement) and near the centerline as I could.

Getting things figured out the first time seemed the toughest task. After that, you may modify the locations but most of the work's done. Don't forget ventillation and adding a porous layer in the bottom of the storage space and allowing a bit of air to circulate can prolong the life of those cans and bottles.
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Old 27-05-2010, 10:00   #20
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Look in all the nooks and crannies of your boat. Our settee is curved and in two corners there is a stereo speaker. Great dry space below each speaker. We store crackers and cookies on the starboard side, and chip bags on the port side.

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Old 27-05-2010, 12:40   #21
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I find the areas under seats and big lockers can be helped by for trays holding the smaller items.

Sail Delmarva: Under Seat Storage

Sail Delmarva: Under-bunk Storage on the PDQ 32

Gear hammocks work for dirty laundry (they double as laundry bags. Other than that, I don't care for them.
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Old 27-05-2010, 17:42   #22
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You know, we bought some of those to try out and had them in the house here and there. They swelled up on us. We replaced them with the same problems occuring. We bought more expensive ones with the same results.

I don't know why we can't get away with using them.

I have this recurring nightmare that a locker packed with them explodes in the middle of the night.

?????????
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Old 01-06-2010, 05:32   #23
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You know, we bought some of those to try out and had them in the house here and there. They swelled up on us. We replaced them with the same problems occuring. We bought more expensive ones with the same results.

I don't know why we can't get away with using them.

I have this recurring nightmare that a locker packed with them explodes in the middle of the night.

?????????
Here on Peregrine, we use Space Bags. I have found that maybe out of 12 bags, 7 or 8 will work, the others don't. Also seems to make a difference what you put in them. Bedding, towels, heavy stuff will not compress, or stay compressed. Most summer clothing seems to stay compressed fairly well. Sometimes, if you mix stuff up, you may find the bags will work. Comforters, forget about it. The stuff will not come out unwrinkled, like they show on TV.

When they work, they work well, but they are fragile. You have to be sure they are not stored where they will get snagged or poked. And, the more you move them, or open them up, the quicker they will fail.
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Old 01-06-2010, 06:48   #24
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We have had good luck with the Space Bags but there is a difference in quality. The cheap brands do not work well. We always buy the better quality and pay the extra price. We have maybe one out of ten fail, but that can usually be traced to a puncture that we did not see at first.
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Old 01-06-2010, 11:12   #25
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It's a bit like solving a puzzle.

. ....I have no problem squashing toilet paper rolls. I use reusable wipes instead of paper towels if I can....
Sorry, for just a minute there........ carry on.
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Old 01-06-2010, 11:43   #26
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Stowage is not a one off job. We try to look in every locker (even the really hard to get at ones) at least once a year and dispose of stuff.

On vacuum bags, we've found that one way is to get them sort of in the space you want, then vacuum away till they are squidged hard into the space you have - we have sails/ropes/cockpit covers stored that way. And even if when we reopen the locker actually the bag is not a vacuum anymore, the other stuff and bulkheads around it has kept the items small and in place. No explosion.

Even on a small boat leave some space for the bits and pieces you love - even if it's just a favourite photo of loved ones laminated and mounted to a bulkhead. You may be keeping a house, but the boat will still be home.
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Old 01-06-2010, 11:53   #27
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One more suggestion: some plastic food containers are collapsible; some of them are microwave safe. We have some on our boat. Sort of makes things disappear. Yesterday I was fixing breakfast on the boat, and complaining that I didn't know where a measuring cup might be. Turned out a whole set of them was under my elbow, stored flat.
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Old 01-06-2010, 12:07   #28
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We sail a twenty-seven footer, so have had to be thoughtful about storage. As noted previously, finding and making use of all those voids and inaccesible/dead spaces which are in every boat, for things you don't use regularly is a good tip; though think about how quickly you'll need each item before you bury it - if it takes five minutes, twice a year to get to the bosuns chair, sump-oil pump or your wellies, that's not a problem, but whilst the flares, fire extinguishers and spot-light get even less (hopefully none) use, you'll need to access them fast when the moment arrives. Perhaps our best space saving idea has been the charts: The half dozen that we're currently/sonon to be, using live in a rack by the chart table, the remainder (perhaps 60 - 80) are rolled up and stored in two lengths of 5" plastic drain pipe, which are suspended on bungy cords and clips from the hull/deck joint bolts at the very front of the forecabin; dry, out of the way and there's still loads of leg room.
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Old 02-06-2010, 14:10   #29
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We keep many items on open shelves with the use of fids and battens fitted horizontally across the base and center of the shelving. Take care and joy, Aythya crew
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Old 02-06-2010, 14:44   #30
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If the boat has a vanity sink as well as a galley sink, consider replacing the vanity and vanity sink with shelving or other storage. You can alway wash in the galley sink, and on a 25-30' boat you are not going to have a whole lot of people on board regularly so it's not going to create backups.
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