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Old 20-02-2007, 16:26   #1
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Thread colour & UV light

Over time we have heard from various sources that black thread ages slower than white because the colour reflects more UV, hence less wear.

A seamstress recently told us this is untrue because hers faded to white and is now wearing thin.

What is your experience?

It seems to me black may wear longer because even though it is a dyed thread, the black would be more protective until it wears off and then becomes more vunerable.

Thoughts?
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Old 20-02-2007, 17:02   #2
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Black is what we don't see because it absorbs all the frequencies in the visible spectrum of light. White is what we see because it reflects all frequencies in the spectrum of visible light. If white reflects all visible light it is less inclined to absorb heat, hence, wearing white in the sun and you'll stay cooler. But, that being said, most of the damaging affects of the sun come from their invisible portions of the spectrum, primarily Ultraviolet. Any fabric can be treated with UV protectors to slow the degredation. Fabrics that are lighter in colour and can stay cooler would probably last longer with adequate UV protection. Irrespective of the type of thread, a combination of lighter thread with UV protection is probably the best bet for longevity.
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Old 20-02-2007, 17:31   #3
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As Rick suggests, more important than colour, is that you use a UV Stabilized thread.
ie: “Tenara”* sewing thread is manufactured from expanded PTFE fiber (“Teflon”), which is UV and Mildew resistant.
GORE™ TENARA® Sewing Thread

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Old 20-02-2007, 18:02   #4
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White/light absorbs UV more/faster than black/dark

Very noticeable especially on lighter spinnaker ripstop nylon cloth. Also on dacron polyester sail material ... hence the reason some folks choose 'tanbark' colored sails. Most sailmakers know this as 'gospel'.
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Old 20-02-2007, 18:28   #5
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Actually I was probably wrong, well right but wrong in the application. I found this on the Doyle Sailmakers site.

Technora
Produced in Japan by Teijin, Technora exhibits a similar or somewhat lower initial modulus than Kevlar 29 and slightly higher resistance to flex fatigue. The fibers lower UV resistance is enhanced by dying the naturally gold fiber black. Technora is most often used as bias support (X-ply) in laminate sailcloth.
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Old 20-02-2007, 18:49   #6
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My bride was a Sunbrella godess before I maried her. It's her interpretation this is true. She went on to get a textile engineering degree and confirmed it has more to do with the dye used on the thread. It appears the dye helps protect the strands of thread.
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